• We present HR Diagrams for the massive star populations in M31 and M33 including several different types of emission-line stars: the confirmed Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs), candidate LBVs, B[e] supergiants and the warm hypergiants. We estimate their apparent temperatures and luminosities for comparison with their respective massive star populations and to evaluate the possible relationships of these different classes of evolved, massive stars, and their evolutionary state. Several of the LBV candidates lie near the LBV/S Dor instability strip which supports their classification. Most of the B[e] supergiants, however, are less luminous than the LBVs. Many are very dusty with the infrared flux contributing one-third or more to their total flux. They are also relatively isolated from other luminous OB stars. Overall, their spatial distribution suggests a more evolved state. Some may be post-RSGs like the warm hypergiants, and there may be more than one path to becoming a B[e] star. There are sufficient differences in the spectra, luminosities, spatial distribution, and the presence or lack of dust between the LBVs and B[e] supergiants to conclude that one group does not evolve into the other.
  • Smith and Tombleson (2015) asserted that statistical tests disprove the standard view of LBVs, and proposed a far more complex scenario to replace it. But Humphreys et al. (2016) showed that Smith and Tombleson's Magellanic "LBV" sample was a mixture of physically different classes of stars, and genuine LBVs are in fact statistically consistent with the standard view. Smith (2016) recently objected at great length to this result. Here we note that he misrepresented some of the arguments, altered the test criteria, ignored some long-recognized observational facts, and employed inadequate statistical procedures. This case illustrates the dangers of uncareful statistical sampling, as well as the need to be wary of unstated assumptions.
  • In this series of papers we have presented the results of a spectroscopic survey of luminous and variable stars in the nearby spirals M31 and M33. In this paper, we present spectroscopy of 132 additional luminous stars, variables, and emission line objects. Most of the stars have emission line spectra, including LBVs and candidate LBVs, Fe II emission line stars and the B[e] supergiants, and the warm hypergiants. Many of these objects are spectroscopically similar and are often confused with each other. With this large spectroscopic data set including various types of emission line stars, we examine their similarities and differences and propose the following criteria that can be used to help distinguish these stars in future work: 1. The B[e] supergiants have emission lines of [O I] and [Fe II] in their spectra. Most of the spectroscopically confirmed sgB[e] stars also have warm circumstellar dust in their SEDs. 2. Confirmed LBVs do not have the [O I] emission lines in their spectra. Some LBVs have [Fe II] emission lines, but not all. Their SEDS shows free-free emission in the near-infrared but no evidence for warm dust. Their most important and defining characteristic is the S Dor-type variability. 3. The warm hypergiants spectroscopically resemble both the LBVs in their eruption or dense wind state and the B[e] supergiants. However, they are very dusty. Some have [Fe II] and [O I] emission in their spectra like the sgB[e] stars, but can be distinguished by their absorption line spectra characteristic of A and F-type supergiants. In contrast, the B[e] supergiant spectra have strong continua and few if any apparent absorption lines.
  • The interaction between a supersonic stellar wind and a (super-)sonic interstellar wind has recently been viewed with new interest. We here first give an overview of the modeling, which includes the heliosphere as an example of a special astrosphere. Then we concentrate on the shock structures of fluid models, especially of hydrodynamic (HD) models. More involved models taking into account radiation transfer and magnetic fields are briefly sketched. Even the relatively simple HD models show a rich shock structure, which might be observable in some objects. We employ a single fluid model to study these complex shock structures, and compare the results obtained including heating and cooling with results obtained without these effects. Furthermore, we show that in the hypersonic case valuable information of the shock structure can be obtained from the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. We solved the Euler equations for the single fluid case and also for a case including cooling and heating. We also discuss the analytical Rankine-Hugoniot relations and their relevance to observations. We show that the only obtainable length scale is the termination shock distance. Moreover, the so-called thin shell approximation is usually not valid. We present the shock structure in the model that includes heating and cooling, which differs remarkably from that of a single fluid scenario in the region of the shocked interstellar medium. We find that the heating and cooling is mainly important in this region and is negligible in the regions dominated by the stellar wind beyond an inner boundary.
  • Cosmic rays passing through large astrospheres can be efficiently cooled inside these "cavities" in the interstellar medium. Moreover, the energy spectra of these energetic particles are already modulated in front of the astrospherical bow shocks. We study the cosmic ray flux in and around lambda Cephei as an example for an astrosphere. The large-scale plasma flow is modeled hydrodynamically with radiative cooling. We studied the cosmic ray flux in a stellar wind cavity using a transport model based on stochastic differential equations. The required parameters, most importantly, the elements of the diffusion tensor, are based on the heliospheric parameters. The magnetic field required for the diffusion coefficients is calculated kinematically. We discuss the transport in an astrospheric scenario with varying parameters for the transport coefficients. We show that large stellar wind cavities can act as sinks for the galactic cosmic ray flux and thus can give rise to small-scale anisotropies in the direction to the observer. Small-scale cosmic ray anisotropies can naturally be explained by the modulation of cosmic ray spectra in huge stellar wind cavities.
  • The SKA will be a state of the art radiotelescope optimized for both large area surveys as well as for deep pointed observations. In this paper we analyze the impact that the SKA will have on Galactic studies, starting from the immense legacy value of the all-sky survey proposed by the continuum SWG but also presenting some areas of Galactic Science that particularly benefit from SKA observations both surveys and pointed. The planned all-sky survey will be characterized by unique spatial resolution, sensitivity and survey speed, providing us with a wide-field atlas of the Galactic continuum emission. Synergies with existing, current and planned radio Galactic Plane surveys will be discussed. SKA will give the opportunity to create a sensitive catalog of discrete Galactic radio sources, most of them representing the interaction of stars at various stages of their evolution with the environment: complete census of all stage of HII regions evolution; complete census of late stages of stellar evolution such as PNe and SNRs; detection of stellar winds, thermal jets, Symbiotic systems, Chemically Peculiar and dMe stars, active binary systems in both flaring and quiescent states. Coherent emission events like Cyclotron Maser in the magnetospheres of different classes of stars can be detected. Pointed, deep observations will allow new insights into the physics of the coronae and plasma processes in active stellar systems and single stars, enabling the detection of flaring activity in larger stellar population for a better comprehension of the mechanism of energy release in the atmospheres of stars with different masses and age.
  • An increasing number of non-terminal eruptions are being found in the numerous surveys for optical transients. Very little is known about these giant eruptions, their progenitors and their evolutionary state. A greatly improved census of the likely progenitor class, including the most luminous evolved stars, the Luminous Blue Varaibles (LBVs), and the warm and cool hypergiants is now needed for a complete picture of the final pre-SN stages of very massive stars. We have begun a survey of the evolved and un stable luminous star populations in several nearby resolved galaxies. In this second paper on M31 and M33, we review the spectral characteristics, spectral energy distributions, circumstellar ejecta, and evidence for mass loss for 82 luminous and variable stars.We show that many of these stars have warm circumstellar dust including several of the Fe II emission line stars, but conclude that the confirmed LBVs in M31 and M33 do not. The confirmed LBVs have relatively low wind speeds even in their hot, quiescent or visual minimum state compared to the B-type supergiants and Of/WN stars which they spectroscopically resemble. The nature of the Fe II emis sion line stars and their relation to the LBV state remains uncertain, but some have properties in common with the warm hypergiants and the sgB[e] stars. Several individual stars are discussed in detail. We identify three possible candidate LBVs and three additional post-red supergiant candidates. We suggest that M33-013406.63 (UIT301,B416) is not an LBV/S Dor variable, but is a very luminous late O-type supergiant and one of the most luminous stars or pair of stars in M33.
  • We discuss the spectrum of Var C in M33 obtained just before the onset of its current brightening and recent spectra during its present "eruption" or optically thick wind stage. These spectra illustrate the typical LBV transition in apparent spectral type or temperature that characterizes the classical LBV or S Dor-type variability. LBVs are known to have slow, dense winds during their maximum phase. Interestingly, Var C had a slow wind even during its hot, quiescent stage in comparison with the normal hot supergiants with similar temperatures. Its outflow or wind speeds also show very little change between these two states.
  • The progenitors of Type IIP supernovae have an apparent upper limit to their initial masses of about 20 solar masses, suggesting that the most massive red supergiants evolve to warmer temperatures before their terminal explosion. But very few post-red supergiants are known. We have identified a small group of luminous stars in M31 and M33 that are candidates for post-red supergiant evolution. These stars have A -- F-type supergiant absorption line spectra and strong hydrogen emission. Their spectra are also distinguished by the Ca II triplet and [Ca II] doublet in emission formed in a low density circumstellar environment. They all have significant near- and mid-infrared excess radiation due to free-free emission and thermal emission from dust. We estimate the amount of mass they have shed and discuss their wind parameters and mass loss rates which range from a few times$ 10^-6 to 10^-4 solar masses/yr. On an HR Diagram, these stars will overlap the region of the LBVs at maximum light, however the warm hypergiants are not LBVs. Their non-spherical winds are not optically thick and they have not exhibited any significant variability. We suggest, however, that the warm hypergiants may be the progenitors of the "less luminous" LBVs such as R71 and even SN1987A.
  • We present spectroscopic observations with high spectral resolution of eta Car as seen by the SE lobe of the Homunculus nebula over the 2003.5 "spectroscopic event". The observed spectra represent the stellar spectrum emitted near the pole of the star and are much less contaminated with nebular emission lines than direct observations of the central object. The "event" is qualitatively similar near the pole to what is observed in direct spectra of the star (more equator-on at 45 degree), but shows interesting differences. The observations show that the equivalent width changes of H alpha emission and other lines are less pronounced at the pole than in the line of sight. Also the absorption components appear less variable. A pronounced high-velocity absorption is present near the event in the He I lines indicating a mass-ejection event. This feature is also seen, but less pronounced, in the hydrogen lines. HeII4686 emission is observed for a brief period of time near the event and appears, if corrected for light travel time, to precede similar emission in the direct view. Our observations indicate that the event is probably not only a change in ionization and excitation structure or a simple eclipse-like event.
  • We present high spectral resolution echelle observations of the Balmer line variations during the 2003.5 ``spectroscopic event'' of eta Carinae. Spectra have been recorded of both eta Carinae and the Homunculus at the FOS4 position in its SE lobe. This spot shows a reflected stellar spectrum which is less contaminated by nebular emission lines than ground-based observations of the central object itself. Our observations show that the spectroscopic event is much less pronounced at this position than when seen directly on eta Car using HST/STIS. Assuming that the reflected spectrum is indeed latitude dependent this indicates that the spectral changes during the event seen pole-on (FOS4) are different from those closer to the equator (directly on the star). In contrast to the spectrum of the star, the scattered spectrum of FOS4 always shows pronounced P Cygni absorption with little variation across the ``spectroscopic event''. After that event an additional high-velocity absorption component appears. The emission profile is more peaked at FOS4 and consists of at least 3 distinct components, of which the reddest one shows the strongest changes through the event. The data seem to be compatible with changes in latitudinal wind structure of a single star, with or without the help of a secondary star, or the onset of a shell ejection during the spectroscopic event.
  • SN2002kg is a type IIn supernova, detected in October 2002 in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2403. We show that the position of SN2002kg agrees within the errors with the position of the LBV V37. Ground based and HST ACS images however show that V37 is still present after the SN2002kg event. We compiled a lightcurve of V37 which underlines the variablity of the object, and shows that SN2002kg was the brightening of V37 and not a supernova. The recent brightening is not a giant eruption, but more likely part of an S Dor phase. V37 shows strong Halpha +[NII] emission in recent images and in the SN2002kg spectrum, which we interprete as the signature of the presence of an LBV nebula. A historic spectrum lacks emission, which may hint that we are witnessing the formation of an LBV nebula.
  • The nebula around eta Carinae consists of two distinct parts: the Homunculus and the outer ejecta. The outer ejecta are mainly a collection of numerous filaments, shaped irregularly and distributed over an area of 1arcminx1arcmin. While the Homunculus is mainly a reflection nebula, the outer ejecta are an emission nebula. Kinematic analysis of the outer ejecta (as the Homunculus) show their bi-directional expansion. Radial velocities in the outer ejecta reach up to >2000km/s and the gas gives rise to X-ray emission. The temperature of the X-ray gas is of the order of 0.65 keV. These shock temperatures indicate velocities of the shocking gas of 750km/s, about what was found for the average expansion velocity of the outer ejecta. HST/STIS data from the strings, long, highly collimated structures in the outer ejecta, show that the electron density of the strings is of the order of 10^4cm^-3 Other structures in the outer ejecta show similar values. String 1 has a mass of about 3 10^-4M_\sun, a density gradient along the strings or a denser leading head was not found.
  • The luminous unstable star (star system) eta Carinae is surrounded by an optically bright bipolar nebula, the Homunculus and a fainter but much larger nebula, the so-called outer ejecta. As images from the EINSTEIN and ROSAT satellites have shown, the outer ejecta is also visible in soft X-rays, while the central source is present in the harder X-ray bands. With our CHANDRA observations we show that the morphology and properties of the X-ray nebula are the result of shocks from fast clumps in the outer ejecta moving into a pre-existing denser circumstellar medium. An additional contribution to the soft X-ray flux results from mutual interactions of clumps within the ejecta. Spectra extracted from the CHANDRA data yield gas temperatures kT of 0.6-0.76 keV. The implied pre-shock velocities of 670-760 km/s are within the scatter of the velocities we measure for the majority of the clumps in the corresponding regions. Significant nitrogen enhancements over solar abundances are needed for acceptable fits in all parts of the outer ejecta, consistent with CNO processed material and non-uniform enhancement. The presence of a diffuse spot of hard X-ray emission at the S condensation shows some contribution of the highest velocity clumps and further underlines the multicomponent, non-equilibrium nature of the X-ray nebula. The detection of an X-ray ``bridge'' between the northern and southern part of the X-ray nebula and an X-ray shadow at the position of the NN bow can be attributed to a large expanding disk, which would appear as an extension of the equatorial disk. No soft emission is seen from the Homunculus, or from the NN bow or the ``strings''.
  • We present a detailed analysis of the morphology and kinematics of nebulae around LBVs and LBV candidates in the Large Magellanic Cloud. HST images and high-resolution Echelle Spectra were used to determine the size, shape, brightness, and expansion velocities of the LBV nebulae around R127, R143, and S61. For S Dor, R71, R99, and R84 we discuss the possible presence of nebular emission, and derive upper limits for the size and lower limits on the expansion velocities of possible nebulae. Including earlier results for the LBV candidates S119 and SK-69 279 we find that in general the nebulae around LBVs in the LMC are comparable in size to those found in the Milky Way. The expansion velocities of the LMC nebulae, however, are significantly lower--by about a factor of 3 to 4--than those of galactic nebulae of comparable size. Galactic and LMC nebulae show about the same diversity of morphologies, but only in the LMC do we find nebulae with outflow. Bipolarity--at least to some degree--is found in nebulae in the LMC as well as in the Milky Way, and manifests a much more general feature among LBV nebulae than previously known.
  • We present an analysis of the kinematic and morphological structure of the nebula around the LMC LBV candidate S 119. On HST images, we find a predominantly spherical nebula which, however, seems to be much better confined in its eastern hemisphere than in the western one. The filamentary western part of the nebula is indicative of matter flowing out of the nebula's main body. This outflow is even more evidenced by our long-slit echelle spectra. They show that, while most of the nebula has an expansion velocity of 25.5 km/s, the outflowing material reaches velocities of almost 140 km/s, relative to the systemic one. A ROSAT HRI image shows no trace of S 119 and thus no indications of hot or shocked material.
  • Eta Carinae is a very luminous and unstable evolved star. Outflowing material ejected during the star's giant eruption in 1843 surrounds it as a nebula which consists of an inner bipolar region(the Homunculus) and the Outer Ejecta. The outer ejecta is very filamentary and shaped irregularly. Kinematic analysis, however, shows a regular bi-directional expansion despite of the complex morphology. Radial velocities in the outer ejecta reach up to 2000 kms/s and give rise to X-ray emission first detected by ROSAT. We will present a detailed study of the outer ejecta based on HST images, high-resolution echelle spectra for kinematic studies, images from CHANDRA/ACIS and HST-STIS spectra.
  • The most massive evolved stars (above 50 M_sun) undergo a phase of extreme mass loss in which their evolution is reversed from a redward to a blueward motion in the HRD. In this phase the stars are known as Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and they are located in the HRD close to the Humphreys-Davidson limit. It is far from understood what causes the strong mass loss or what triggers the so-called giant eruptions, active events in which in a short time a large amount of mass is ejected. Here I will present results from a larger project devoted to better understand LBVs through studying the LBV nebulae. These nebulae are formed as a consequence of the strong mass loss. The analysis concentrates on the morphology and kinematics of these nebulae. Of special concern was the frequently observed bipolar nature of the LBV nebulae. Bipolarity seems to be a general feature and strongly constrains models of the LBV phase and especially of the formation of the nebulae. In addition we found outflows from LBV nebulae, the first evidence for ongoing instabilities in the nebulae.
  • The extremely luminous and unstable star Eta Carinae is surrounded by ejecta formed during the star's giant eruption around 1843. The optical nebula consists of an inner region, the bipolar Homunculus and the outer ejecta. The X-ray emission as detected in ROSAT and CHANDRA shows a hook shaped emission structure mainly at the position of the outer ejecta substantially larger than the Homunculus. We present results of a comparative study of the optical morphology, the kinematics and the X-ray emission of the outer ejecta around Eta Carinae. In general we find that the X-ray emission traces the shocks of faster moving knots in the outer ejecta. First results of CHANDRA/ACIS data will be presented, with spectra of selected areas in the outer ejecta giving insight to the conditions (temperature, present elements and degree of ionization) of the hot gas. The X-ray spectra will again be compared to the kinematics of the gas as known from our optical spectra.
  • The most massive stars, with initial masses above ~50M_sun, encounter a phase of extreme mass loss - sometimes accompanied by so-called giant eruptions - in which the stars' evolution is reversed from a redward to a blueward motion in the HRD. In this phase the stars are known as Luminous Blue Variable (LBVs).Neither the reason for the onset of the strong mass loss nor the cause for the giant eruptions is really understood, nor is their implications for the evolution of these most massive stars. I will present a study of the LBV nebulae which are formed in this phase as a consequence of the strong mass loss and draw conclusions from the morphology and kinematics of these nebulae on possible eruption mechanisms and stellar parameters of the LBV stars. The analysis contains a large collection of LBV nebulae which form an evolutionary sequence of LBV nebulae. A special concern will be the frequently observed bipolar nature of the LBV nebulae which seems to be a general feature and presents strong constraints on further models of the LBV phase and especially on the formation mechanism of the nebulae.
  • The Luminous Blue Variable star Eta Carinae is one of the most massive stars known. It underwent a giant eruption in 1843 in which the Homunculus nebula was created. ROSAT and ASCA data indicate the existence of a hard and a soft X-ray component which appear to be spatially distinct: a softer diffuse shell of the nebula around Eta Carinae and a harder point-like source centered on the star Eta Car. Astonishingly the morphology of the X-ray emission is very different from the optical appearance of the nebula. We present a comparative analysis of optical morphology, the kinematics, and the diffuse soft X-ray structure of the nebula around Eta Carinae. Our kinematic analysis of the nebula shows extremely high expansion velocities. We find a strong correlation between the X-ray emission and the knots in the nebula and the largest velocities, i.e. the X-ray morphology of the nebula around Eta Carinae is determined by the interaction between material streaming away from Eta Car and the ambient medium.
  • WRA 751 is an evolved massive star in our Galaxy closely resembling Luminous Blue Variable stars (LBVs). It is surrounded by a nitrogen enriched nebula of ab out 23" diameter. A comparative study of the nebula's morphology and kinematics is presented, it supports - together with spectroscopical evidence - the classification of WRA 751 as a LBV. Images show that the nebula consists of a nearly spherical shell as well as a bipolar-like structure north and south of its main body, the Northern and Southern Caps. In contrast to the almost spherical appearance of the main body of the nebula, the kinematics shows a deviation even of this part from a classical spherical expansion pattern. From the present data it can be concluded that the main body expands asymmetrically (central expansion velocity ~26 km/s), with a thicker shell at the back side. A bump-like structure can be found to the west of the central star. In addition to the main body, bipolar kinematic components can be identified with the morphologically classified Caps. These results put WRA 751 into the class of LBVs which are surrounded by a nebula with bipolar components, albeit considerably less pronounced than, for instance, in the classical bipolar LBVs Eta Car and HR Car.