• We present Spitzer Space Telescope time-series photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m of 2MASS J11193254$-$1137466AB and WISEA J114724.10$-$204021.3, two planetary-mass, late-type ($\sim$L7) brown dwarf members of the $\sim$10 Myr old TW Hya Association. These observations were taken in order to investigate whether or not a tentative trend of increasing variability amplitude with decreasing surface gravity seen for L3-L5.5 dwarfs extends to later-L spectral types and to explore the angular momentum evolution of low-mass objects. We examine each light curve for variability and find a rotation period of 19.39$^{+0.33}_{-0.28}$ hours and semi-amplitudes of 0.798$^{+0.081}_{-0.083}$% at 3.6 $\mu$m and 1.108$^{+0.093}_{-0.094}$% at 4.5 $\mu$m for WISEA J114724.10$-$204021.3. For 2MASS J11193254$-$1137466AB, we find a single period of 3.02$^{+0.04}_{-0.03}$ hours with semi-amplitudes of 0.230$^{+0.036}_{-0.035}$% at 3.6 $\mu$m and 0.453 $\pm$ 0.037% at 4.5 $\mu$m, which we find is possibly due to the rotation of one component of the binary. Combining our results with 12 other late-type L dwarfs observed with Spitzer from the literature, we find no significant differences between the 3.6 $\mu$m amplitudes of low surface gravity and field gravity late-type L brown dwarfs at Spitzer wavelengths, and find tentative evidence (75% confidence) of higher amplitude variability at 4.5 $\mu$m for young, late-type Ls. We also find a median rotation period of young brown dwarfs (10-300 Myr) of $\sim$10 hr, more than twice the value of the median rotation period of field age brown dwarfs ($\sim$4 hr), a clear signature of brown dwarf rotational evolution.
  • We present a catalog of interesting targets recently identified using data from Campaign 16 of the K2 mission. Our catalog includes 32 high-quality planet candidates (showing no signs of being non- planetary in nature), 54 more ambiguous events that may be either planets or false positives, 169 eclipsing binaries, and 217 other regularly periodic variable sources. We have released light curves for all targets in C16, and have also released system parameters and transit vetting plots for all interesting candidates identified in this paper. Of particular interest is a candidate planet orbiting the bright F dwarf HD 73344 (V = 6.9, K = 5.6) with an orbital period of 15 days. If confirmed, this object would correspond to a $\sim2.6 R_{\oplus}$ planet and would likely be a favorable target for radial velocity characterization. Campaign 16 is one of just two K2 campaigns observed so far in "forward-facing" mode, which enables immediate follow-up observations from the ground. This paper is intended as a rapid release of planet candidates, eclipsing binaries and other interesting periodic variables to maximize the scientific yield of this campaign, and as a test run for the upcoming TESS mission, whose frequent data releases call for similarly rapid candidate identification and efficient follow-up.
  • We present new photometric data of 11 hot Jupiter transiting exoplanets (CoRoT-12b, HAT-P-5b, HAT-P-12b, HAT-P-33b, HAT-P-37b, WASP-2b, WASP-24b, WASP-60b, WASP-80b, WASP-103b, XO-3b) in order to update their planetary parameters and to constrain information about their atmospheres. These observations of CoRoT-12b, HAT-P-37b and WASP-60b are the first follow-up data since their discovery. Additionally, the first near-UV transits of WASP-80b and WASP-103b are presented. We compare the results of our analysis with previous work to search for transit timing variations (TTVs) and a wavelength dependence in the transit depth. TTVs may be evidence of a third body in the system and variations in planetary radius with wavelength can help constrain the properties of the exoplanet's atmosphere. For WASP-103b and XO-3b, we find a possible variation in the transit depths that may be evidence of scattering in their atmospheres. The B-band transit depth of HAT-P-37b is found to be smaller than its near-IR transit depth and such a variation may indicate TiO/VO absorption. These variations are detected from 2-4.6$\sigma$, so follow-up observations are needed to confirm these results. Additionally, a flat spectrum across optical wavelengths is found for 5 of the planets (HAT-P-5b, HAT-P-12b, WASP-2b, WASP-24b, WASP-80b), suggestive that clouds may be present in their atmospheres. We calculate a refined orbital period and ephemeris for all the targets, which will help with future observations. No TTVs are seen in our analysis with the exception of WASP-80b and follow-up observations are needed to confirm this possible detection.
  • The late-type Be star $\beta$ CMi is remarkably stable compared to other Be stars that have been studied. This has led to a realistic model of the outflowing Be disk by Klement et al. These results showed that the disk is likely truncated at a finite radius from the star, which Klement et al.~suggest is evidence for an unseen binary companion in orbit. Here we report on an analysis of the Ritter Observatory spectroscopic archive of $\beta$ CMi to search for evidence of the elusive companion. We detect periodic Doppler shifts in the wings of the H$\alpha$ line with a period of 170 d and an amplitude of 2.25 km s$^{-1}$, consistent with a low-mass binary companion ($M\approx 0.42 M_\odot$). We then compared the small changes in the violet-to-red peak height changes ($V/R$) with the orbital motion. We find weak evidence that it does follow the orbital motion, as suggested by recent Be binary models by Panoglou et al. Our results, which are similar to those for several other Be stars, suggest that $\beta$ CMi may be a product of binary evolution where Roche lobe overflow has spun up the current Be star, likely leaving a hot subdwarf or white dwarf in orbit around the star. Unfortunately, no direct sign of this companion star is found in the very limited archive of {\it International Ultraviolet Explorer} spectra.
  • We have monitored photometrically the Y0 brown dwarf WISEP J173835.52+273258.9 (W1738) at both near- and mid-infrared wavelengths. This ~1 Gyr-old 400K dwarf is at a distance of 8pc and has a mass around 5 M_Jupiter. We observed W1738 using two near-infrared filters at lambda~1um, Y and J, on Gemini observatory, and two mid-infrared filters at lambda~4um, [3.6] and [4.5], on the Spitzer observatory. Twenty-four hours were spent on the source by Spitzer on each of June 30 and October 30 2013 UT. Between these observations, around 5 hours were spent on the source by Gemini on each of July 17 and August 23 2013 UT. The mid-infrared light curves show significant evolution between the two observations separated by four months. We find that a double sinusoid can be fit to the [4.5] data, where one sinusoid has a period of 6.0 +/- 0.1 hours and the other a period of 3.0 +/- 0.1 hours. The near-infrared observations suggest variability with a ~3.0 hour period, although only at a <~2 sigma confidence level. We interpret our results as showing that the Y dwarf has a 6.0 +/- 0.1 hour rotation period, with one or more large-scale surface features being the source of variability. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the light curve at [4.5] is 3%. The amplitude of the near-infrared variability, if real, may be as high as 5 to 30%. Intriguingly, this size of variability and the wavelength dependence can be reproduced by atmospheric models that include patchy KCl and Na_2S clouds and associated small changes in surface temperature. The small number of large features, and the timescale for evolution of the features, is very similar to what is seen in the atmospheres of the solar system gas giants.
  • Transits of exoplanets observed in the near-UV have been used to study the scattering properties of their atmospheres and possible star-planet interactions. We observed the primary transits of 15 exoplanets (CoRoT-1b, GJ436b, HAT-P-1b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-16b, HAT-P-22b, TrES-2b, TrES-4b, WASP-1b, WASP-12b, WASP-33b, WASP-36b, WASP-44b, WASP-48b, and WASP-77Ab) in the near-UV and several optical photometric bands to update their planetary parameters, ephemerides, search for a wavelength dependence in their transit depths to constrain their atmospheres, and determine if asymmetries are visible in their light curves. Here we present the first ground-based near-UV light curves for 12 of the targets (CoRoT-1b, GJ436b, HAT-P-1b, HAT-P-13b, HAT-P-22b, TrES-2b, TrES-4b, WASP-1b, WASP-33b, WASP-36b, WASP-48b, and WASP-77Ab). We find that none of the near-UV transits exhibit any non-spherical asymmetries, this result is consistent with recent theoretical predictions by Ben-Jaffel et al. and Turner et al. The multi-wavelength photometry indicates a constant transit depth from near-UV to optical wavelengths in 10 targets (suggestive of clouds), and a varying transit depth with wavelength in 5 targets (hinting at Rayleigh or aerosol scattering in their atmospheres). We also present the first detection of a smaller near-UV transit depth than that measured in the optical in WASP-1b and a possible opacity source that can cause such radius variations is currently unknown. WASP-36b also exhibits a smaller near-UV transit depth at 2.6$\sigma$. Further observations are encouraged to confirm the transit depth variations seen in this study.
  • We present the first detection of photometric variability of a spectroscopically-confirmed Y dwarf. The Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope was used to obtain times series photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 microns over a twenty four hour period at two different epochs separated by 149 days. Variability is evident at 4.5 um in the first epoch and at 3.6 and 4.5 um in the second epoch which suggests that the underlying cause or causes of this variability change on the timescales of months. The second-epoch [3.6] and [4.5] light curves are nearly sinusoidal in form, in phase, have periods of roughly 8.5 hours, and have semi-amplitudes of 3.5%. We find that a simple geometric spot model with a single bright spot reproduces these observations well. We also compare our measured semi-amplitudes of the second epoch light curves to predictions of the static, one-dimensional, partly cloudy and hot spot models of Morley and collaborators and find that neither set of models can reproduce the observed [3.6] and[4.5] semi-amplitudes simultaneously. More advanced two- or three-dimensional models that include time-dependent phenomena like vertical mixing, cloud formation, and thermal relaxation are therefore sorely needed in order to properly interpret our observations.
  • We observed nine primary transits of the hot Jupiter TrES-3b in several optical and near-UV photometric bands from 2009 June to 2012 April in an attempt to detect its magnetic field. Vidotto, Jardine and Helling suggest that the magnetic field of TrES-3b can be constrained if its near-UV light curve shows an early ingress compared to its optical light curve, while its egress remains unaffected. Predicted magnetic field strengths of Jupiter-like planets should range between 8 G and 30 G. Using these magnetic field values and an assumed B_star of 100 G, the Vidotto et al. method predicts a timing difference of 5-11 min. We did not detect an early ingress in our three nights of near-UV observations, despite an average cadence of 68 s and an average photometric precision of 3.7 mmag. However, we determined an upper limit of TrES-3b's magnetic field strength to range between 0.013 and 1.3 G (for a 1-100 G magnetic field strength range for the host star, TrES-3) using a timing difference of 138 s derived from the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem. To verify our results of an abnormally small magnetic field strength for TrES-3b and to further constrain the techniques of Vidotto et al., we propose future observations of TrES-3b with other platforms capable of achieving a shorter near-UV cadence. We also present a refinement of the physical parameters of TrES-3b, an updated ephemeris and its first published near-UV light curve. We find that the near-UV planetary radius of Rp = 1.386+0.248-0.144 RJup is consistent with the planet's optical radius.