• Faint star-forming galaxies at $z\sim 2-3$ can be used as alternative background sources to probe the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest in addition to quasars, yielding high sightline densities that enable 3D tomographic reconstruction of the foreground absorption field. Here, we present the first data release from the COSMOS Lyman-Alpha Mapping And Mapping Observations (CLAMATO) Survey, which was conducted with the LRIS spectrograph on the Keck-I telescope. Over an observational footprint of 0.157$\mathrm{deg}^2$ within the COSMOS field, we used 240 galaxies and quasars at $2.17<z<3.00$, with a mean comoving transverse separation of $2.37\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc^3}$, as background sources probing the foreground Lyman-$\alpha$ forest absorption at $2.05<z<2.55$. The Lyman-$\alpha$ forest data was then used to create a Wiener-filtered tomographic reconstruction over a comoving volume of $3.15\,\times 10^5\,h^{-3}\,\mathrm{Mpc^3}$ with an effective smoothing scale of $2.5\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc}$. In addition to traditional figures, this map is also presented as a virtual-reality YouTube360 video visualization and manipulable interactive figure. We see large overdensities and underdensities that visually agree with the distribution of coeval galaxies from spectroscopic redshift surveys in the same field, including overdensities associated with several recently-discovered galaxy protoclusters in the volume. This data release includes the redshift catalog, reduced spectra, extracted Lyman-$\alpha$ forest pixel data, and tomographic map of the absorption.
  • Recent work has suggested extreme [OIII] emitting star-forming galaxies are important to reionization. Relatedly, [OIII]/[OII] has been put forward as an indirect estimator of the Lyman Continuum (LyC) escape fraction ($f_{esc}$) at $z\gtrsim4.5$ when the opaque IGM renders LyC photons unobservable. Using deep archival U-band (VLT/VIMOS) imaging of a recently confirmed overdensity at $z\sim3.5$ we calculate tight constraints on $f_{esc}$ for a sample (N=73) dominated by extreme [OIII] emitters. We find no Lyman Continuum signal ($f_{esc}^{rel} < 6.3^{+0.7}_{-0.7} \%$ at $1\sigma$) in a deep U-band stack of our sample (31.98 mag at 1$\sigma$). This constraint is in agreement with recent studies of star-forming galaxies spanning $z\sim1-4$ that have found very low average $f_{esc}$. Despite the galaxies in our study having an estimated average rest-frame EW([OIII]$\lambda5007$)$\sim400\AA$ and [OIII]/[OII]$\sim 4$ from composite SED-fitting, we find no LyC detection, which brings into question the potential of [OIII]/[OII] as an effective probe of the LyC--a majority of LyC emitters have [OIII]/[OII]$>3$, but we establish here that [OIII]/[OII]$>3$ does not guarantee significant LyC leakage for a population. Since even extreme star-forming galaxies are unable to produce the $f_{esc}\sim10-15\%$ required by most theoretical calculations for star-forming galaxies to drive reionization, there must either be a rapid evolution of $f_{esc}$ between $z\sim3.5$ and the Epoch of Reionization, or hitherto observationally unstudied sources (e.g. ultra-faint low-mass galaxies with $\log(M/M_\odot)\sim7-8.5$) must make an outsized contribution to reionization.
  • We use the IllustrisTNG simulations to investigate the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) for star-forming cluster galaxies as a function of the formation history of their cluster host. The simulations predict an enhancement in the gas-phase metallicities of star-forming cluster galaxies (10^9< M_star<10^10 M_sun) at z<1.0 in comparisons to field galaxies. This is qualitatively consistent with observations. We find that the metallicity enhancement of cluster galaxies appears prior to their infall into the central cluster potential, indicating for the first time a systematic "chemical pre-processing" signature for {\it infalling} cluster galaxies. Namely, galaxies which will fall into a cluster by z=0 show a ~0.05 dex enhancement in the MZR compared to field galaxies at z<0.5. Based on the inflow rate of gas into cluster galaxies and its metallicity, we identify that the accretion of pre-enriched gas is the key driver of the chemical evolution of such galaxies, particularly in the stellar mass range (10^9< M_star<10^10 M_sun). We see signatures of an environmental dependence of the ambient/inflowing gas metallicity which extends well outside the nominal virial radius of clusters. Our results motivate future observations looking for pre-enrichment signatures in dense environments.
  • We investigate the relationship between the black hole accretion rate (BHAR) and star-formation rate (SFR) for Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31)-mass progenitors from z = 0.2 - 2.5. We source galaxies from the Ks-band selected ZFOURGE survey, which includes multi-wavelenth data spanning 0.3 - 160um. We use decomposition software to split the observed SEDs of our galaxies into their active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming components, which allows us to estimate BHARs and SFRs from the infrared (IR). We perform tests to check the robustness of these estimates, including a comparison to BHARs and SFRs derived from X-ray stacking and far-IR analysis, respectively. We find as the progenit- ors evolve, their relative black hole-galaxy growth (i.e. their BHAR/SFR ratio) increases from low to high redshift. The MW-mass progenitors exhibit a log-log slope of 0.64 +/- 0.11, while the M31-mass progenitors are 0.39 +/- 0.08. This result contrasts with previous studies that find an almost flat slope when adopting X-ray/AGN-selected or mass-limited samples and is likely due to their use of a broad mixture of galaxies with different evolutionary histories. Our use of progenitor-matched samples highlights the potential importance of carefully selecting progenitors when searching for evolutionary relationships between BHAR/SFRs. Additionally, our finding that BHAR/SFR ratios do not track the rate at which progenitors quench casts doubts over the idea that the suppression of star-formation is predominantly driven by luminous AGN feedback (i.e. high BHARs).
  • We study galactic star-formation activity as a function of environment and stellar mass over 0.5<z<2.0 using the FourStar Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) survey. We estimate the galaxy environment using a Bayesian-motivated measure of the distance to the third nearest neighbor for galaxies to the stellar mass completeness of our survey, $\log(M/M_\odot)>9 (9.5)$ at z=1.3 (2.0). This method, when applied to a mock catalog with the photometric-redshift precision ($\sigma_z / (1+z) \lesssim 0.02$), recovers galaxies in low- and high-density environments accurately. We quantify the environmental quenching efficiency, and show that at z> 0.5 it depends on galaxy stellar mass, demonstrating that the effects of quenching related to (stellar) mass and environment are not separable. In high-density environments, the mass and environmental quenching efficiencies are comparable for massive galaxies ($\log (M/M_\odot)\gtrsim$ 10.5) at all redshifts. For lower mass galaxies ($\log (M/M)_\odot) \lesssim$ 10), the environmental quenching efficiency is very low at $z\gtrsim$ 1.5, but increases rapidly with decreasing redshift. Environmental quenching can account for nearly all quiescent lower mass galaxies ($\log(M/M_\odot) \sim$ 9-10), which appear primarily at $z\lesssim$ 1.0. The morphologies of lower mass quiescent galaxies are inconsistent with those expected of recently quenched star-forming galaxies. Some environmental process must transform the morphologies on similar timescales as the environmental quenching itself. The evolution of the environmental quenching favors models that combine gas starvation (as galaxies become satellites) with gas exhaustion through star-formation and outflows ("overconsumption"), and additional processes such as galaxy interactions, tidal stripping and disk fading to account for the morphological differences between the quiescent and star-forming galaxy populations.
  • We present a study of the relation between galaxy stellar age and mass for 14 members of the $z=1.62$ protocluster IRC 0218, using multiband imaging and HST G102 and G141 grism spectroscopy. Using $UVJ$ colors to separate galaxies into star forming and quiescent populations, we find that at stellar masses $M_* \geq 10^{10.85} M_{\odot}$, the quiescent fraction in the protocluster is $f_Q=1.0^{+0.00}_{-0.37}$, consistent with a $\sim 2\times $ enhancement relative to the field value, $f_Q=0.45^{+0.03}_{-0.03}$. At masses $10^{10.2} M_{\odot} \leq M_* \leq 10^{10.85} M_{\odot}$, $f_Q$ in the cluster is $f_Q=0.40^{+0.20}_{-0.18}$, consistent with the field value of $f_Q=0.28^{+0.02}_{-0.02}$. Using galaxy $D_{n}(4000)$ values derived from the G102 spectroscopy, we find no relation between galaxy stellar age and mass. These results may reflect the impact of merger-driven mass redistribution, which is plausible as this cluster is known to host many dry mergers. Alternately, they may imply that the trend in $f_Q$ in IRC 0218 was imprinted over a short timescale in the protocluster's assembly history. Comparing our results with those of other high-redshift studies and studies of clusters at $z\sim 1$, we determine that our observed relation between $f_Q$ and stellar mass only mildly evolves between $z\sim 1.6$ and $z \sim 1$, and only at stellar masses $M_* \leq 10^{10.85} M_{\odot}$. Both the $z\sim 1$ and $z\sim 1.6$ results are in agreement that the red sequence in dense environments was already populated at high redshift, $z \ge 3$, placing constraints on the mechanism(s) responsible for quenching in dense environments at $z\ge 1.5$
  • Recent observations of galaxies in a cluster at z=0.35 show that their integrated gas-phase metallicities increase with decreasing cluster-centric distance. To test if ram pressure stripping (RPS) is the underlying cause, we use a semi-analytic model to quantify the "observational bias" that RPS introduces into the aperture-based metallicity measurements. We take integral field spectroscopy of local galaxies, remove gas from their outer galactic disks via RPS, and then conduct mock slit observations of cluster galaxies at z=0.35. Our RPS model predicts a typical cluster-scale metallicity gradient of -0.03 dex/Mpc. By removing gas from the outer galactic disks, RPS introduces a mean metallicity enhancement of +0.02 dex at a fixed stellar mass. This gas removal and subsequent quenching of star formation preferentially removes low mass cluster galaxies from the observed star-forming population. As only the more massive star-forming galaxies survive to reach the cluster core, RPS produces a cluster-scale stellar mass gradient of -0.05 log(M_*/M_sun)/Mpc. This mass segregation drives the predicted cluster-scale metallicity gradient of -0.03 dex/Mpc. However, the effects of RPS alone can not explain the higher metallicities measured in cluster galaxies at z=0.35. We hypothesize that additional mechanisms including steep internal metallicity gradients and self-enrichment due to gas strangulation are needed to reproduce our observations at z=0.35.
  • In the early Universe finding massive galaxies that have stopped forming stars present an observational challenge as their rest-frame ultraviolet emission is negligible and they can only be reliably identified by extremely deep near-infrared surveys. These have revealed the presence of massive, quiescent early-type galaxies appearing in the universe as early as z~2, an epoch 3 Gyr after the Big Bang. Their age and formation processes have now been explained by an improved generation of galaxy formation models where they form rapidly at z~3-4, consistent with the typical masses and ages derived from their observations. Deeper surveys have now reported evidence for populations of massive, quiescent galaxies at even higher redshifts and earlier times, however the evidence for their existence, and redshift, has relied entirely on coarsely sampled photometry. These early massive, quiescent galaxies are not predicted by the latest generation of theoretical models. Here, we report the spectroscopic confirmation of one of these galaxies at redshift z=3.717 with a stellar mass of 1.7$\times$10$^{11}$ M$_\odot$ whose absorption line spectrum shows no current star-formation and which has a derived age of nearly half the age of the Universe at this redshift. The observations demonstrates that the galaxy must have quickly formed its stars within the first billion years of cosmic history in an extreme and short starburst. This ancestral event is similar to those starting to be found by sub-mm wavelength surveys pointing to a possible connection between these two populations. Early formation of such massive systems is likely to require significant revisions to our picture of early galaxy assembly.
  • Using deep multi-wavelength photometry of galaxies from ZFOURGE, we group galaxies at $2.5<z<4.0$ by the shape of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We identify a population of galaxies with excess emission in the $K_s$-band, which corresponds to [OIII]+H$\beta$ emission at $2.95<z<3.65$. This population includes 78% of the bluest galaxies with UV slopes steeper than $\beta = -2$. We de-redshift and scale this photometry to build two composite SEDs, enabling us to measure equivalent widths of these Extreme [OIII]+H$\beta$ Emission Line Galaxies (EELGs) at $z\sim3.5$. We identify 60 galaxies that comprise a composite SED with [OIII]+H$\beta$ rest-frame equivalent width of $803\pm228$\AA\ and another 218 galaxies in a composite SED with equivalent width of $230\pm90$\AA. These EELGs are analogous to the `green peas' found in the SDSS, and are thought to be undergoing their first burst of star formation due to their blue colors ($\beta < -1.6$), young ages ($\log(\rm{age}/yr)\sim7.2$), and low dust attenuation values. Their strong nebular emission lines and compact sizes (typically $\sim1.4$ kpc) are consistent with the properties of the star-forming galaxies possibly responsible for reionizing the universe at $z>6$. Many of the EELGs also exhibit Lyman-$\alpha$ emission. Additionally, we find that many of these sources are clustered in an overdensity in the Chandra Deep Field South, with five spectroscopically confirmed members at $z=3.474 \pm 0.004$. The spatial distribution and photometric redshifts of the ZFOURGE population further confirm the overdensity highlighted by the EELGs.
  • Using observations made with MOSFIRE on Keck I as part of the ZFIRE survey, we present the stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation at 2.0 < z < 2.5. The sample was drawn from a stellar mass limited, Ks-band selected catalog from ZFOURGE over the CANDELS area in the COSMOS field. We model the shear of the Halpha emission line to derive rotational velocities at 2.2X the scale radius of an exponential disk (V2.2). We correct for the blurring effect of a two-dimensional PSF and the fact that the MOSFIRE PSF is better approximated by a Moffat than a Gaussian, which is more typically assumed for natural seeing. We find for the Tully-Fisher relation at 2.0 < z < 2.5 that logV2.2 =(2.18 +/- 0.051)+(0.193 +/- 0.108)(logM/Msun - 10) and infer an evolution of the zeropoint of Delta M/Msun = -0.25 +/- 0.16 dex or Delta M/Msun = -0.39 +/- 0.21 dex compared to z = 0 when adopting a fixed slope of 0.29 or 1/4.5, respectively. We also derive the alternative kinematic estimator S0.5, with a best-fit relation logS0.5 =(2.06 +/- 0.032)+(0.211 +/- 0.086)(logM/Msun - 10), and infer an evolution of Delta M/Msun= -0.45 +/- 0.13 dex compared to z < 1.2 if we adopt a fixed slope. We investigate and review various systematics, ranging from PSF effects, projection effects, systematics related to stellar mass derivation, selection biases and slope. We find that discrepancies between the various literature values are reduced when taking these into account. Our observations correspond well with the gradual evolution predicted by semi-analytic models.
  • We use the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain WFC3/F390W imaging of the supergroup SG1120-1202 at z=0.37, mapping the UV emission of 138 spectroscopically confirmed members. We measure total (F390W-F814W) colors and visually classify the UV morphology of individual galaxies as "clumpy" or "smooth." Approximately 30% of the members have pockets of UV emission (clumpy) and we identify for the first time in the group environment galaxies with UV morphologies similar to the jellyfish galaxies observed in massive clusters. We stack the clumpy UV members and measure a shallow internal color gradient, which indicates unobscured star formation is occurring throughout these galaxies. We also stack the four galaxy groups and measure a strong trend of decreasing UV emission with decreasing projected group distance ($R_{proj}$). We find that the strong correlation between decreasing UV emission and increasing stellar mass can fully account for the observed trend in (F390W-F814W) - $R_{proj}$, i.e., mass-quenching is the dominant mechanism for extinguishing UV emission in group galaxies. Our extensive multi-wavelength analysis of SG1120-1202 indicates that stellar mass is the primary predictor of UV emission, but that the increasing fraction of massive (red/smooth) galaxies at $R_{proj}$ < 2$R_{200}$ and existence of jellyfish candidates is due to the group environment.
  • For the first time, we present the size evolution of a mass-complete (log(M*/Msol)>10) sample of star-forming galaxies over redshifts z=1-7, selected from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE). Observed H-band sizes are measured from the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/F160W imaging. Distributions of individual galaxy masses and sizes illustrate that a clear mass-size relation exists up to z~7. At z~7, we find that the average galaxy size from the mass-size relation is more compact at a fixed mass of log(M*/Msol)=10.1, with r_1/2,maj=1.02+/-0.29 kpc, than at lower redshifts. This is consistent with our results from stacking the same CANDELS HST/F160W imaging, when we correct for galaxy position angle alignment. We find that the size evolution of star-forming galaxies is well fit by a power law of the form r_e = 7.07(1 + z)^-0.89 kpc, which is consistent with previous works for normal star-formers at 1<z<4. In order to compare our slope with those derived Lyman break galaxy studies, we correct for different IMFs and methodology and find a slope of -0.97+/-0.02, which is shallower than that reported for the evolution of Lyman break galaxies at z>4 (r_e\propto(1 +z)^-1.2+/-0.06). Therefore, we conclude the Lyman break galaxies likely represent a subset of highly star-forming galaxies that exhibit rapid size growth at z>4.
  • We compare galaxy scaling relations as a function of environment at $z\sim2$ with our ZFIRE survey where we have measured H$\alpha$ fluxes for 90 star-forming galaxies selected from a mass-limited [$\log(M_{\star}/M_{\odot})>9$] sample based on ZFOURGE. The cluster galaxies (37) are part of a confirmed system at z=2.095 and the field galaxies (53) are at $1.9<z<2.4$; all are in the COSMOS legacy field. There is no statistical difference between H$\alpha$-emitting cluster and field populations when comparing their star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass ($M_{\star}$), galaxy size ($r_{eff}$), SFR surface density [$\Sigma$(H$\alpha_{star}$)], and stellar age distributions. The only difference is that at fixed stellar mass, the H$\alpha$-emitting cluster galaxies are $\log(r_{eff})\sim0.1$ larger than in the field. Approximately 19% of the H$\alpha$-emitters in the cluster and 26% in the field are IR-luminous ($L_{IR}>2\times10^{11} L_{\odot}$). Because the LIRGs in our combined sample are $\sim5$ times more massive than the low-IR galaxies, their radii are $\sim70$% larger. To track stellar growth, we separate galaxies into those that lie above, on, and below the H$\alpha$ star-forming main sequence (SFMS) using $\Delta$SFR$(M_{\star})=\pm0.2$ dex. Galaxies above the SFMS (starbursts) tend to have higher H$\alpha$ SFR surface densities and younger light-weighted stellar ages compared to galaxies below the SFMS. Our results indicate that starbursts (+SFMS) in the cluster and field at $z\sim2$ are growing their stellar cores. Lastly, we compare to the (SFR-$M_{\star}$) relation from RHAPSODY cluster simulations and find the predicted slope is nominally consistent with the observations. However, the predicted cluster SFRs tend to be too low by a factor of $\sim2$ which seems to be a common problem for simulations across environment.
  • We present the first observation of cluster-scale radial metallicity gradients from star-forming galaxies. We use the DEIMOS spectrograph on the Keck II telescope to observe two CLASH clusters at z~0.35: MACS1115+0129 and RXJ1532+3021. Based on our measured interstellar medium (ISM) properties of star-forming galaxies out to a radius of 2.5 Mpc from the cluster centre, we find that the galaxy metallicity decreases as a function of projected cluster-centric distance (-0.15+/-0.08 dex/Mpc) in MACS1115+01. On the mass-metallicity relation (MZR), star-forming galaxies in MACS1115+01 are offset to higher metallicity (~0.2 dex) than the local SDSS galaxies at a fixed mass range. In contrast, the MZR of RXJ1532+30 is consistent with the local comparison sample. RXJ1532+30 exhibits a bimodal radial metallicity distribution, with one branch showing a similar negative gradient as MACS1115+01 (-0.14+/-0.05 dex/Mpc) and the other branch showing a positive radial gradient. The positive gradient branch in RXJ1532+30 is likely caused by either interloper galaxies or an in-plane merger, indicating that cluster-scale abundance gradients probe cluster substructures and thus the dynamical state of a cluster. Most strikingly, we discover that neither the radial metallicity gradient nor the offset from the MZR is driven by the stellar mass. We compare our observations with Rhapsody-G cosmological hydrodynamical zoom-in simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters and find that the simulated galaxy cluster also exhibits a negative abundance gradient, albeit with a shallower slope (-0.04+/-0.03 dex/Mpc). Our observations suggest that the negative radial gradient originates from ram-pressure stripping and/or strangulation processes in the cluster environments.
  • The FourStar galaxy evolution survey (ZFOURGE) is a 45 night legacy program with the FourStar near-infrared camera on Magellan and one of the most sensitive surveys to date. ZFOURGE covers a total of $400\ \mathrm{arcmin}^2$ in cosmic fields CDFS, COSMOS and UDS, overlapping CANDELS. We present photometric catalogs comprising $>70,000$ galaxies, selected from ultradeep $K_s$-band detection images ($25.5-26.5$ AB mag, $5\sigma$, total), and $>80\%$ complete to $K_s<25.3-25.9$ AB. We use 5 near-IR medium-bandwidth filters ($J_1,J_2,J_3,H_s,H_l$) as well as broad-band $K_s$ at $1.05\ - 2.16\ \mu m$ to $25-26$ AB at a seeing of $\sim0.5$". Each field has ancillary imaging in $26-40$ filters at $0.3-8\ \mu m$. We derive photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. Comparing with spectroscopic redshifts indicates a photometric redshift uncertainty $\sigma_z={0.010,0.009}$, and 0.011 in CDFS, COSMOS, and UDS. As spectroscopic samples are often biased towards bright and blue sources, we also inspect the photometric redshift differences between close pairs of galaxies, finding $\sigma_{z,pairs}= 0.01-0.02$ at $1<z<2.5$. We quantify how $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ depends on redshift, magnitude, SED type, and the inclusion of FourStar medium bands. $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ is smallest for bright, blue star-forming samples, while red star-forming galaxies have the worst $\sigma_{z,pairs}$. Including FourStar medium bands reduces $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ by 50\% at $1.5<z<2.5$. We calculate SFRs based on ultraviolet and ultradeep far-IR $Spitzer$/MIPS and Herschel/PACS data. We derive rest-frame $U-V$ and $V-J$ colors, and illustrate how these correlate with specific SFR and dust emission to $z=3.5$. We confirm the existence of quiescent galaxies at $z\sim3$, demonstrating their SFRs are suppressed by $>\times15$.
  • We investigate the star formation rate (SFR) dependence on the stellar mass and gas-phase metallicity relation at z=2 with MOSFIRE/Keck as part of the ZFIRE survey. We have identified 117 galaxies (1.98 < z < 2.56), with $8.9\leq$log(M/M$_{\odot}$)$\leq11.0$, for which we can measure gas-phase metallicities. For the first time, we show discernible difference between the mass-metallicity relation, using individual galaxies, when deviding the sample by low ($<10$~M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$) and high ($>10$~M$_{\odot}$yr$^{-1}$) SFRs. At fixed mass, low star-forming galaxies tend to have higher metallicity than high star-forming galaxies. Using a few basic assumptions, we further show that the gas masses and metallicities required to produce the fundamental mass--metallicity relation, and its intrinsic scatter, are consistent with cold-mode accretion predictions obtained from the OWLS hydrodynamical simulations. Our results from both simulations and observations are suggestive that cold-mode accretion is responsible for the fundamental mass-metallicity relation at $z=2$ and demonstrates the direct relationship between cosmological accretion and the fundamental properties of galaxies.
  • We perform a kinematic analysis of galaxies at $z\sim2$ in the COSMOS legacy field using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy from Keck/MOSFIRE as part of the ZFIRE survey. Our sample consists of 75 Ks-band selected star-forming galaxies from the ZFOURGE survey with stellar masses ranging from log(M$_{\star}$/M$_{\odot}$)$=9.0-11.0$, 28 of which are members of a known overdensity at $z=2.095$. We measure H$\alpha$ emission-line integrated velocity dispersions ($\sigma_{\rm int}$) from 50$-$230 km s$^{-1}$, consistent with other emission-line studies of $z\sim2$ field galaxies. From these data we estimate virial, stellar, and gas masses and derive correlations between these properties for cluster and field galaxies at $z\sim2$. We find evidence that baryons dominate within the central effective radius. However, we find no statistically significant differences between the cluster and the field, and conclude that the kinematics of star-forming galaxies at $z\sim2$ are not significantly different between the cluster and field environments.
  • We investigate the dependance of galaxy sizes and star-formation rates (SFRs) on environment using a mass-limited sample of quiescent and star-forming galaxies with M>10^9.5 at z=0.92 selected from the NMBS survey. Using the GEEC2 spectroscopic cluster catalog and the accurate photometric redshifts from NMBS, we select quiescent and star-forming cluster (sigma=490 km/s) galaxies within two virial radius, Rvir, intervals of 0.5<Rvir<2 and Rvir<0.5. Galaxies residing outside of 2 Rvir of both the cluster centres and additional candidate over-densities are defined as our field sample. Galaxy structural parameters are measured from the COSMOS legacy HST/ACS F814W image. The sizes and Sersic indices of quiescent field and cluster galaxies have the same distribution regardless of Rvir. However, cluster star-forming galaxies within 0.5 Rvir have lower mass-normalised average sizes, by 16${\pm}7\%$, and a higher fraction of Sersic indices with n>1, than field star-forming galaxies. The average SFRs of star-forming cluster galaxies show a trend of decreasing SFR with clustocentric radius. The mass-normalised average SFR of cluster star-forming galaxies is a factor of 2-2.5 (7-9 sigma) lower than that of star-forming galaxies in the field. While we find no significant dependence on environment for quiescent galaxies, the properties of star-forming galaxies are affected, which could be the result of environment acting on their gas content.
  • We investigate active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates within the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) to determine the impact they have on star-formation in their host galaxies. We first identify a population of radio, X-ray, and infrared-selected AGN by cross-matching the deep $K_{s}$-band imaging of ZFOURGE with overlapping multi-wavelength data. From this, we construct a mass-complete (log(M$_{*}$/M$_{\odot}$) $\ge$ 9.75), AGN luminosity limited sample of 235 AGN hosts over z = 0.2 - 3.2. We compare the rest-frame U - V versus V - J (UVJ) colours and specific star-formation rates (sSFRs) of the AGN hosts to a mass-matched control sample of inactive (non-AGN) galaxies. UVJ diagnostics reveal AGN tend to be hosted in a lower fraction of quiescent galaxies and a higher fraction of dusty galaxies than the control sample. Using 160{\mu}m Herschel PACS data, we find the mean specific star-formation rate of AGN hosts to be elevated by 0.34$\pm$0.07 dex with respect to the control sample across all redshifts. This offset is primarily driven by infrared-selected AGN, where the mean sSFR is found to be elevated by as much as a factor of ~5. The remaining population, comprised predominantly of X-ray AGN hosts, is found mostly consistent with inactive galaxies, exhibiting only a marginal elevation. We discuss scenarios that may explain these findings and postulate that AGN are less likely to be a dominant mechanism for moderating galaxy growth via quenching than has previously been suggested.
  • We explore star-formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies based on the evolution of the star-formation rate stellar mass relation (SFR-M*). Using data from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) in combination with far-IR imaging from the Spitzer and Herschel observatories we measure the SFR-M* relation at 0.5 < z < 4. Similar to recent works we find that the average infrared SEDs of galaxies are roughly consistent with a single infrared template across a broad range of redshifts and stellar masses, with evidence for only weak deviations. We find that the SFR-M* relation is not consistent with a single power-law of the form SFR ~ M*^a at any redshift; it has a power-law slope of a~1 at low masses, and becomes shallower above a turnover mass (M_0) that ranges from 10^9.5 - 10^10.8 Msol, with evidence that M_0 increases with redshift. We compare our measurements to results from state-of-the-art cosmological simulations, and find general agreement in the slope of the SFR-M* relation albeit with systematic offsets. We use the evolving SFR-M* sequence to generate SFHs, finding that typical SFRs of individual galaxies rise at early times and decline after reaching a peak. This peak occurs earlier for more massive galaxies. We integrate these SFHs to generate mass-growth histories and compare to the implied mass-growth from the evolution of the stellar mass function. We find that these two estimates are in broad qualitative agreement, but that there is room for improvement at a more detailed level. At early times the SFHs suggest mass-growth rates that are as much as 10x higher than inferred from the stellar mass function. However, at later times the SFHs under-predict the inferred evolution, as is expected in the case of additional growth due to mergers.
  • We present a weak gravitational lensing analysis of supergroup SG1120$-$1202, consisting of four distinct X-ray-luminous groups, that will merge to form a cluster comparable in mass to Coma at $z=0$. These groups lie within a projected separation of 1 to 4 Mpc and within $\Delta v=550$ km s$^{-1}$ and form a unique protocluster to study the matter distribution in a coalescing system. Using high-resolution {\em HST}/ACS imaging, combined with an extensive spectroscopic and imaging data set, we study the weak gravitational distortion of background galaxy images by the matter distribution in the supergroup. We compare the reconstructed projected density field with the distribution of galaxies and hot X-ray emitting gas in the system and derive halo parameters for the individual density peaks. We show that the projected mass distribution closely follows the locations of the X-ray peaks and associated brightest group galaxies. One of the groups that lies at slightly lower redshift ($z\approx 0.35$) than the other three groups ($z\approx 0.37$) is X-ray luminous, but is barely detected in the gravitational lensing signal. The other three groups show a significant detection (up to $5 \sigma$ in mass), with velocity dispersions between $355^{+55}_{-70}$ and $530^{+45}_{-55}$ km s$^{-1}$ and masses between $0.8^{+0.4}_{-0.3} \times 10^{14}$ and $1.6^{+0.5}_{-0.4}\times 10^{14} h^{-1} M_{\odot}$, consistent with independent measurements. These groups are associated with peaks in the galaxy and gas density in a relatively straightforward manner. Since the groups show no visible signs of interaction, this supports the picture that we are catching the groups before they merge into a cluster.
  • We spectroscopically survey the galaxy cluster XMM-LSS J02182-05102 (hereafter IRC 0218) using LRIS (optical) and MOSFIRE (near-infrared) on Keck I as part of the ZFIRE survey. IRC 0218 has a narrow redshift range of $1.612<z_{\rm spec}<1.635$ defined by 33 members of which 20 are at R$_{\rm proj}<1$ Mpc. The cluster redshift and velocity dispersion are $z_{\rm cl}=1.6233\pm0.0003$ and $\sigma_{\rm cl}=254\pm50$ km s$^{-1}$. We reach NIR line sensitivities of $\sim0.3\times10^{-17}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ that, combined with multi-wavelength photometry, provide extinction-corrected H$\alpha$ star formation rates (SFR), gas phase metallicities from [NII]/H$\alpha$, and stellar masses. We measure an integrated H$\alpha$ SFR of $\sim325{\rm M}_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ (26 members; R$_{\rm proj}<2$ Mpc) and show that the elevated star formation in the cluster core (R$_{\rm proj}<0.25$ Mpc) is driven by the concentration of star-forming members, but the average SFR per H$\alpha$-detected galaxy is half that of members at R$_{\rm proj}\sim1$ Mpc. However, we do not detect any environmental imprint when comparing attenuation and gas phase metallicities: the cluster galaxies show similar trends with M$_{\star}$ as to the field, e.g. more massive galaxies have larger stellar attenuation. IRC 0218's gas phase metallicity-M$_{\star}$ relation (MZR) is offset to lower metallicities relative to $z\sim0$ and has a slope of $0.13\pm0.10$. Comparing the MZR in IRC 0218 to the COSMOS cluster at $z=2.1$ shows no evolution ($\Delta t\sim1$ Gyr): the MZR for both galaxy clusters are remarkably consistent with each other and virtually identical to several field surveys at $z\sim2$.
  • We investigate the ISM properties of 13 star-forming galaxies within the z~2 COSMOS cluster. We show that the cluster members have [NII]/Ha and [OIII]/Hb emission-line ratios similar to z~2 field galaxies, yet systematically different emission-line ratios (by ~0.17 dex) from the majority of local star-forming galaxies. We find no statistically significant difference in the [NII]/Ha and [OIII]/Hb line ratios or ISM pressures among the z~2 cluster galaxies and field galaxies at the same redshift. We show that our cluster galaxies have significantly larger ionization parameters (by up to an order of magnitude) than local star-forming galaxies. We hypothesize that these high ionization parameters may be associated with large specific star formation rates (i.e. a large star formation rate per unit stellar mass). If this hypothesis is correct, then this relationship would have important implications for the geometry and/or the mass of stars contained within individual star clusters as a function of redshift.
  • There is ongoing debate regarding the extent that environment affects galaxy size growth beyond z>1. To investigate the differences in star-forming and quiescent galaxy properties as a function of environment at z=2.1, we create a mass-complete sample of 59 cluster galaxies Spitler et al. (2012) and 478 field galaxies with log(M)>9 using photometric redshifts from the ZFOURGE survey. We compare the mass-size relation of field and cluster galaxies using measured galaxy semi-major axis half-light radii ($r_{1/2,maj}$) from CANDELS HST/F160W imaging. We find consistent mass normalized (log(M)=10.7) sizes for quiescent field galaxies ($r_{1/2,maj}=1.81\pm0.29$ kpc) and quiescent cluster galaxies ($r_{1/2,maj}=2.17\pm0.63$ kpc). The mass normalized size of star-forming cluster galaxies ($r_{1/2,maj}=4.00\pm0.26$ kpc ) is 12% larger (KS test $2.1\sigma$) than star-forming field galaxies ($r_{1/2,maj}=3.57\pm0.10$ kpc). From the mass-color relation we find that quiescent field galaxies with 9.7<log(M)<10.4 are slightly redder (KS test $3.6\sigma$) than quiescent cluster galaxies, while cluster and field quiescent galaxies with log(M)>10.4 have consistent colors. We find that star-forming cluster galaxies are on average 20% redder than star-forming field galaxies at all masses. Furthermore, we stack galaxy images to measure average radial color profiles as a function of mass. Negative color gradients are only present for massive star-forming field and cluster galaxies with log(M)>10.4, the remaining galaxy masses and types have flat profiles. Our results suggest given the observed differences in size and color of star-forming field and cluster galaxies, that the environment has begun to influence/accelerate their evolution. However, the lack of differences between field and cluster quiescent galaxies indicates that the environment has not begun to significantly influence their evolution at z~2.
  • We investigate the environmental dependence of the mass-metallicity relation at z=2 with MOSFIRE/Keck as part of the ZFIRE survey. Here, we present the chemical abundance of a Virgo-like progenitor at z=2.095 that has an established red sequence. We identified 43 cluster ($<z>=2.095\pm0.004$) and 74 field galaxies ($<z>=2.195\pm0.083$) for which we can measure metallicities. For the first time, we show that there is no discernible difference between the mass-metallicity relation of field and cluster galaxies to within 0.02dex. Both our field and cluster galaxy mass-metallicity relations are consistent with recent field galaxy studies at z~2. We present hydrodynamical simulations for which we derive mass-metallicity relations for field and cluster galaxies. We find at most a 0.1dex offset towards more metal-rich simulated cluster galaxies. Our results from both simulations and observations are suggestive that environmental effects, if present, are small and are secondary to the ongoing inflow and outflow processes that are governed by galaxy halo mass.