• Tunnelling, one of the key features of quantum mechanics, ignited an ongoing debate about the value, meaning and interpretation of 'tunnelling time'. Until recently the debate was purely theoretical, with the process considered to be instantaneous for all practical purposes. This changed with the development of ultrafast lasers and in particular, the 'attoclock' technique that is used to probe the attosecond dynamics of electrons. Although the initial attoclock measurements hinted at instantaneous tunnelling, later experiments contradicted those findings, claiming to have measured finite tunnelling times. In each case these measurements were performed with multi-electron atoms. Atomic hydrogen (H), the simplest atomic system with a single electron, can be 'exactly' (subject only to numerical limitations) modelled using numerical solutions of the 3D-TDSE with measured experimental parameters and acts as a convenient benchmark for both accurate experimental measurements and calculations. Here we report the first attoclock experiment performed on H and find that our experimentally determined offset angles are in excellent agreement with accurate 3D-TDSE simulations performed using our experimental pulse parameters. The same simulations with a short-range Yukawa potential result in zero offset angles for all intensities. We conclude that the offset angle measured in the attoclock experiments originates entirely from electron scattering by the long-range Coulomb potential with no contribution from tunnelling time delay. That conclusion is supported by empirical observation that the electron offset angles follow closely the simple formula for the deflection angle of electrons undergoing classical Rutherford scattering by the Coulomb potential. Thus we confirm that, in H, tunnelling is instantaneous (with an upperbound of 1.8 as) within our experimental and numerical uncertainty.
  • Recent attoclock experiments and theoretical studies regarding the strong-field ionization of atoms by few-cycle infrared pulses revealed new features that have attracted much attention. Here we investigate tunneling ionization and the dynamics of the electron probability using Bohmian Mechanics. We consider a one-dimensional problem to illustrate the underlying mechanisms of the ionization process. It is revealed that in the major part of the below-the-barrier ionization regime, in an intense and short infrared pulse, the electron does not tunnel \through" the entire barrier, but rather already starts from the classically forbidden region. Moreover, we highlight the correspondence between the probability of locating the electron at a particular initial position and its asymptotic momentum. Bohmian Mechanics also provides a natural definition of mean tunneling time and exit position, taking account of the time dependence of the barrier. Finally, we find that the electron can exit the barrier with significant kinetic energy, thereby corroborating the results of a recent study [Camus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 119 (2017) 023201].
  • One of the most challenging and recurring problems when modelling plasmas is the lack of data on key atomic and molecular reactions that drive plasma processes. Even when there are data for some reactions, complete and validated datasets of chemistries are rarely available. This hinders research on plasma processes and curbs development of industrial applications. The QDB project aims to address this problem by providing a platform for provision, exchange, and validation of chemistry datasets. A new data model developed for QDB is presented. QDB collates published data on both electron scattering and heavy-particle reactions. These data are formed into reaction sets, which are then validated against experimental data where possible. This process produces both complete chemistry sets and identifies key reactions that are currently unreported in the literature. Gaps in the datasets can be filled using established theoretical methods. Initial validated chemistry sets for SF$_6$/CF$_4$/O$_2$ and SF$_6$/CF$_4$/N$_2$/H$_2$ are presented as examples.
  • We consider the ionization of neon induced by a femtosecond laser pulse composed of overlapping, linearly polarized bichromatic extreme ultraviolet and infrared fields. In particular, we study the effects of the infrared light on a two-pathway ionization scheme for which Ne 2s22p53s1P is used as intermediate state. Using time-dependent calculations, supported by a theoretical approach based on the strong-field approximation, we analyze the ionization probability and the photoelectron angular distributions associated with the different sidebands of the ionization spectrum. Complex oscillations of the angular distribution anisotropy parameters as a function of the infrared light intensity are revealed. Finally, we demonstrate that coherent control of the asymmetry is achievable by tuning the infrared frequency to a nearby electronic transition.
  • We analyze the photoelectron angular distribution in two-pathway interference between non\-resonant one-photon and resonant two-photon ionization of neon. We consider a bichromatic femtosecond XUV pulse whose fundamental frequency is tuned near the $2p^5 3s$ atomic states of neon. The time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation is solved and the results are employed to compute the angular distribution and the associated anisotropy parameters at the main photoelectron line. We also employ a time-dependent perturbative approach, which allows obtaining information on the process for a large range of pulse parameters, including the steady-state case of continuous radiation, i.e., an infinitely long pulse. The results from the two methods are in relatively good agreement over the domain of applicability of perturbation theory.
  • An overview of quantum-mechanical methods to generate cross-section data for electron collisions with atoms and molecules is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on the time-independent close-coupling approach, since it is particularly suitable for low-energy collisions and also allows for systematic improvements as well as uncertainty estimates. The basic ideas are illustrated with examples for electron collisions with argon atoms and methane. For many atomic systems, such as e-Ar collisions, highly reliable cross sections can now be computed with quantified uncertainties. On the other hand, while electron collision calculations with molecules do provide key input data for plasma models, the methods and computer codes presently used require further development to make these inputs robust.
  • The B-spline R-matrix and the convergent close-coupling methods are used to study electron collisions with neutral beryllium over an energy range from threshold to 100 eV. Coupling to the target continuum significantly affects the results for transitions from the ground state, but to a lesser extent the strong transitions between excited states. Cross sections are presented for selected transitions between low-lying physical bound states of beryllium, as well as for elastic scattering, momentum transfer, and ionization. The present cross sections for transitions from the ground state from the two methods are in excellent agreement with each other, and also with other available results based on nonperturbative convergent pseudo-state and time-dependent close-coupling models. The elastic cross section at low energies is dominated by a prominent shape resonance. The ionization from the $(2s2p)^3P$ and $(2s2p)^1P$ states strongly depends on the respective term. The current predictions represent an extensive set of electron scattering data for neutral beryllium, which should be sufficient for most modeling applications.
  • We study strong-field atomic ionization driven by an XUV pulse with a non\-zero displacement, the quantity defined as the integral of the pulse vector potential taken over the pulse duration. We demonstrate that the use of such pulses may lead to an extreme sensitivity of the ionization process to subtle changes of the parameters of a driving XUV pulse, in particular, the ramp-on/off profile and the carrier envelope phase. We illustrate this sensitivity for atomic hydrogen and lithium driven by few-femto\-second XUV pulses with intensity in the $\rm 10^{14}~W/cm^2$ range. We argue that the observed effect is general and should modify strong-field ionization of any atom, provided the ionization rate is sufficiently high.
  • We consider the spin-exchange (SE) cross section in electron scattering from $^3$He\,{\scriptsize II}, which drives the hyperfine-changing \hbox{3.46 cm} (8.665 GHz) line transition. Both the analytical quantum defect method --- applicable at very low energies --- and accurate R-matrix techniques for electron-He$^+$ scattering are employed to obtain SE cross sections. The quantum defect theory is also applied to electron collisions with other one-electron ions in order to demonstrate the utility of the method and derive scaling relations. At very low energies, the hyperfine-changing cross sections due to e$-$He$^+$ scattering are much larger in magnitude than for electron collisions with neutral hydrogen, hinting at large rate constants for equilibration. Specifically, we obtain rate coefficients of $K(10\,{\rm K}) = 1.10 \times 10^{-6}\,\rm cm^3/s$ and $K(100\,{\rm K}) = 3.49\times 10^{-7}\,\rm cm^3/s$.
  • We revisit the time-resolved photoemission in neon atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We calculate streaking time shifts for the emission of 2p and 2s electrons and compare the relative delay as measured in a recent experiment by Schultze et al. [Science 328, 1658 (2010)]. The B-spline R-matrix method is employed to calculate accurate Eisenbud-Wigner-Smith time delays from multi- electron dipole transition matrix elements for photoionization. The additional laser field-induced time shifts in the exit channel are obtained from separate, time-dependent simulations of a full streaking process by solving the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation on the single-active-electron level. The resulting accurate total relative streaking time shifts between 2s and 2p emission lie well below the experimental data. We identify the presence of unresolved shake-up satellites in the experiment as a potential source of error in the determination of streaking time shifts.
  • We have carried out calculations of the triple-differential cross section for one-photon double ionization of molecular hydrogen for a central photon energy of $75$~eV, using a fully {\it ab initio}, nonperturbative approach to solve the time-dependent \Schro equation in prolate spheroidal coordinates. The spatial coordinates $\xi$ and $\eta$ are discretized in a finite-element discrete-variable representation. The wave packet of the laser-driven two-electron system is propagated in time through an effective short iterative Lanczos method to simulate the double ionization of the hydrogen molecule. For both symmetric and asymmetric energy sharing, the present results agree to a satisfactory level with most earlier predictions for the absolute magnitude and the shape of the angular distributions. A notable exception, however, concerns the predictions of the recent time-independent calculations based on the exterior complex scaling method in prolate spheroidal coordinates [Phys.~Rev.~A~{\bf 82}, 023423 (2010)]. Extensive tests of the numerical implementation were performed, including the effect of truncating the Neumann expansion for the dielectronic interaction on the description of the initial bound state and the predicted cross sections. We observe that the dominant escape mode of the two photoelectrons dramatically depends upon the energy sharing. In the parallel geometry, when the ejected electrons are collected along the direction of the laser polarization axis, back-to-back escape is the dominant channel for strongly asymmetric energy sharing, while it is completely forbidden if the two electrons share the excess energy equally.
  • Triple-differential cross sections for two-photon double ionization of molecular hydrogen are presented for a central photon energy of 30 eV. The calculations are based on a fully {\it ab initio}, nonperturbative, approach to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in prolate spheroidal coordinates, discretized by a finite-element discrete-variable-representation. The wave function is propagated in time for a few femtoseconds using the short, iterative Lanczos method to study the correlated response of the two photoelectrons to short, intense laser radiation. The current results often lie in between those of Colgan {\it et al} [J. Phys. B {\bf 41} (2008) 121002] and Morales {\it et al} [J. Phys. B {\bf 41} (2009) 134013]. However, we argue that these individual predictions should not be compared directly to each other, but preferably to experimental data generated under well-defined conditions.
  • We present a fully {\it ab initio}, non-perturbative, time-dependent approach to describe single and double ionization of helium by proton and antiproton impact. A flexible and accurate finite-element discrete-variable-representation is applied to discretize the problem on the radial grid in spherical coordinates. Good agreement with the most recent experimental data for absolute angle-integrated cross sections is obtained over a wide range of incident projectile energies between 3 keV and 6 MeV. Furthermore, angle-differential cross sections for two-electron ejection are predicted for a proton impact energy of 6 MeV. Finally, the time evaluation of the ionization process is portrayed by displaying the electron density as a function of the projectile location.