• This article describes a data center hosting a web portal for accessing and sharing the output of large, cosmological, hydro-dynamical simulations with a broad scientific community. It also allows users to receive related scientific data products by directly processing the raw simulation data on a remote computing cluster. The data center has a multi-layer structure: a web portal, a job control layer, a computing cluster and a HPC storage system. The outer layer enables users to choose an object from the simulations. Objects can be selected by visually inspecting 2D maps of the simulation data, by performing highly compounded and elaborated queries or graphically by plotting arbitrary combinations of properties. The user can run analysis tools on a chosen object. These services allow users to run analysis tools on the raw simulation data. The job control layer is responsible for handling and performing the analysis jobs, which are executed on a computing cluster. The innermost layer is formed by a HPC storage system which hosts the large, raw simulation data. The following services are available for the users: (I) {\sc ClusterInspect} visualizes properties of member galaxies of a selected galaxy cluster; (II) {\sc SimCut} returns the raw data of a sub-volume around a selected object from a simulation, containing all the original, hydro-dynamical quantities; (III) {\sc Smac} creates idealised 2D maps of various, physical quantities and observables of a selected object; (IV) {\sc Phox} generates virtual X-ray observations with specifications of various current and upcoming instruments.
  • We investigate the central sub-arcsec region of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus NGC 1052, using a high-angular resolution dataset that covers 10 orders of magnitude in frequency. This allows us to infer the continuum emission within the innermost $\sim {17}\,$pc around the black hole to be of non-thermal, synchrotron origin and to set a limit to the maximum contribution of a standard accretion disc. Assuming the canonical 10 per cent mass-light conversion efficiency for the standard accretion disc, its inferred accretion power would be too low by one order of magnitude to account for the observed continuum luminosity. We thus introduce a truncated accretion disc and derive a truncation radius to mass-light conversion efficiency relation, which we use to reconcile the inferred accretion power with the continuum luminosity. As a result we find that a truncated disc providing the necessary accretion power must be truncated at $r_\text{tr} \gtrsim {26}\, r_\text{g}$, consistent with the inner radius derived from the observations of the Fe K$\alpha$ line in the X-ray spectrum of this nucleus. This is the first time to derive a limit on the truncation radius of the accretion disc from high-angular resolution data only.
  • We study the evolution of substructure in the mass distribution with mass, redshift and radius in a sample of simulated galaxy clusters. The sample, containing $1226$ objects, spans the mass range $M_{200} = 10^{14} - 1.74 \times 10^{15} \ {\rm M_{\odot}} \ h^{-1}$ in six redshift bins from $z=0$ to $z=1.179$. We consider three different diagnostics: 1) subhalos identified with SUBFIND; 2) overdense regions localized by dividing the cluster into octants; 3) offset between the potential minimum and the center of mass. The octant analysis is a new method that we introduce in this work. We find that none of the diagnostics indicate a correlation between the mass of the cluster and the fraction of substructures. On the other hand, all the diagnostics suggest an evolution of substructures with redshift. For SUBFIND halos, the mass fraction is constant with redshift at $R_{\mathrm{vir}}$, but shows a mild evolution at $R_{200}$ and $R_{500}$. Also, the fraction of clusters with at least a subhalo more massive than one thirtieth of the total mass is less than $20 \%$. Our new method based on the octants returns a mass fraction in substructures which has a strong evolution with redshift at all radii. The offsets also evolve strongly with redshift. We also find a strong correlation for individual clusters between the offset and the fraction of substructures identified with the octant analysis. Our work puts strong constraints on the amount of substructures we expect to find in galaxy clusters and on their evolution with redshift.
  • Observational cosmology is passing through a unique moment of grandeur with the amount of quality data growing fast. However, in order to better take advantage of this moment, data analysis tools have to keep up the pace. Understanding the effect of baryonic matter on the large-scale structure is one of the challenges to be faced in cosmology. In this work, we have thoroughly studied the effect of baryonic physics on different lensing statistics. Making use of the Magneticum Pathfinder suite of simulations we show that the influence of luminous matter on the 1-point lensing statistics of point sources is significant, enhancing the probability of magnified objects with $\mu>3$ by a factor of $2$ and the occurrence of multiple-images by a factor $5-500$ depending on the source redshift and size. We also discuss the dependence of the lensing statistics on the angular resolution of sources. Our results and methodology were carefully tested in order to guarantee that our uncertainties are much smaller than the effects here presented.
  • Selecting disk galaxies from the cosmological, hydrodynamical simulation Magneticum Pathfinder we show that almost half of our poster child disk galaxies at $z=2$ show significantly declining rotation curves and low dark matter fractions, very similar to recently reported observations. These galaxies do not show any anomalous behavior, reside in standard dark matter halos and typically grow significantly in mass until $z = 0$, where they span all morphological classes, including disk galaxies matching present day rotation curves and observed dark matter fractions. Our findings demonstrate that declining rotation curves and low dark matter fractions in rotation dominated galaxies at $z=2$ appear naturally within the $\Lambda$CDM paradigm and reflect the complex baryonic physics, which plays a role at the peak epoch of star-formation. In addition, we find some dispersion dominated galaxies at $z=2$ which host a significant gas disk and exhibit similar shaped rotation curves as the disk galaxy population, rendering it difficult to differentiate between these two populations with currently available observation techniques.
  • State-of-the-art integral field surveys like $\mathrm{ATLAS^{3D}}$, SLUGGS, CALIFA, SAMI, and MaNGA provide large data sets of kinematical observations of early-type galaxies (ETGs), yielding constraints on the formation of ETGs. Using the cosmological hydrodynamical \textit{Magneticum Pathfinder} simulations, we investigate the paradigm of fast and slow rotating ETGs in a fully cosmological context. We show that the ETGs within the \textit{Magneticum} simulation are in remarkable agreement with the observations, revealing fast and slow rotators quantified by the angular momentum proxy $\lambda_{\mathrm{R}}$ and the flattening $\epsilon$ with the observed prevalence. Taking full advantage of the three-dimensional data, we demonstrate that the dichotomy between fast and slow rotating galaxies gets enhanced, showing an upper and lower population separated by an underpopulated region in the edge-on $\lambda_{\mathrm{R}}$-$\epsilon$ plane. Following the evolution of the $\lambda_{\mathrm{R}}$-$\epsilon$ plane through cosmic time, we find that, while the upper population is already in place at $z=2$, the lower population gets statistically significant below $z=1$ with a gradual increase. At least $50\%$ of the galaxies transition from fast to slow rotators on a short timescale, in most cases associated to a significant merger event. Furthermore, we connect the $M_{*}$-$j_{*}$ plane, quantified by the $b$-value, with the $\lambda_{\mathrm{R}}$-$\epsilon$ plane, revealing a strong correlation between the position of a galaxy in the $\lambda_{\mathrm{R}}$-$\epsilon$ plane and the $b$-value. Going one step further, we classify our sample based on features in their velocity map, finding all five common kinematic groups, also including the recently observed group of prolate rotators, populating distinct regions in the $\lambda_{\mathrm{R}}$-$b$ plane.
  • We present an implementation of thermal conduction including the anisotropic effects of magnetic fields for SPH. The anisotropic thermal conduction is mainly proceeding parallel to magnetic fields and suppressed perpendicular to the fields. We derive the SPH formalism for the anisotropic heat transport and solve the corresponding equation with an implicit conjugate gradient scheme. We discuss several issues of unphysical heat transport in the cases of extreme ansiotropies or unmagnetized regions and present possible numerical workarounds. We implement our algorithm into the GADGET code and study its behaviour in several test cases. In general, we reproduce the analytical solutions of our idealised test problems, and obtain good results in cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formations. Within galaxy clusters, the anisotropic conduction produces a net heat transport similar to an isotropic Spitzer conduction model with an efficiency of one per cent. In contrast to isotropic conduction our new formalism allows small-scale structure in the temperature distribution to remain stable, because of their decoupling caused by magnetic field lines. Compared to observations, isotropic conduction with more than 10 per cent of the Spitzer value leads to an oversmoothed temperature distribution within clusters, while the results obtained with anisotropic thermal conduction reproduce the observed temperature fluctuations well. A proper treatment of heat transport is crucial especially in the outskirts of clusters and also in high density regions. It's connection to the local dynamical state of the cluster also might contribute to the observed bimodal distribution of cool core and non cool core clusters. Our new scheme significantly advances the modelling of thermal conduction in numerical simulations and overall gives better results compared to observations.
  • Recent hydrodynamic cosmological simulations cover volumes up to Gpc^3 and resolve halos across a wide range of masses and environments, from massive galaxy clusters down to normal galaxies, while following a large variety of physical processes (star formation, chemical enrichment, AGN feedback) to allow a self-consistent comparison to observations at multiple wavelengths. Using the Magneticum simulations, we investigate the buildup of the diffuse stellar component (DSC) around massive galaxies within group and cluster environments. The DSC in our simulations reproduces the spatial distribution of the observed intracluster light (ICL) as well as its kinematic properties remarkably well. For galaxy clusters and groups we find that, although the DSC in almost all cases shows a clear separation from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) with regard to its dynamic state, the radial stellar density distribution in many halos is often characterized by a single Sersic profile, representing both the BCG component and the DSC, very much in agreement with current observational results. Interestingly, even in those halos that clearly show two components in both the dynamics and the spatial distribution of the stellar component, no correlation between them is evident.
  • We present evidence from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations for a co-evolution of the slope of the total (dark and stellar) mass density profile, gamma_tot, and the dark matter fraction within the half-mass radius, f_DM, in early-type galaxies. The relation can be described as gamma_tot = A f_DM + B for all systems at all redshifts. The trend is set by the decreasing importance of gas dissipation towards lower redshifts and for more massive systems. Early-type galaxies are smaller, more concentrated, have lower f_DM and steeper gamma_tot at high redshifts and at lower masses for a given redshift; f_DM and gamma_tot are good indicators for growth by "dry" merging. The values for A and B change distinctively for different feedback models, and this relation can be used as a test for such models. A similar correlation exists between gamma_tot and the stellar mass surface density Sigma_*. A model with weak stellar feedback and feedback from black holes is in best agreement with observations. All simulations, independent of the assumed feedback model, predict steeper gamma_tot and lower f_DM at higher redshifts. While the latter is in agreement with the observed trends, the former is in conflict with lensing observations, which indicate constant or decreasing gamma_tot. This discrepancy is shown to be artificial: the observed trends can be reproduced from the simulations using observational methodology to calculate the total density slopes.
  • Comparisons between observed and predicted strong lensing properties of galaxy clusters have been routinely used to claim either tension or consistency with $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. However, standard approaches to such cosmological tests are unable to quantify the preference for one cosmology over another. We advocate approximating the relevant Bayes factor using a marginal likelihood that is based on the following summary statistic: the posterior probability distribution function for the parameters of the scaling relation between Einstein radii and cluster mass, $\alpha$ and $\beta$. We demonstrate, for the first time, a method of estimating the marginal likelihood using the X-ray selected $z>0.5$ MACS clusters as a case in point and employing both N-body and hydrodynamic simulations of clusters. We investigate the uncertainty in this estimate and consequential ability to compare competing cosmologies, that arises from incomplete descriptions of baryonic processes, discrepancies in cluster selection criteria, redshift distribution, and dynamical state. The relation between triaxial cluster masses at various overdensities provide a promising alternative to the strong lensing test.
  • The large-scale structure of the universe can only be observed via luminous tracers of the dark matter. However, the clustering statistics of tracers are biased and depend on various properties, such as their host-halo mass and assembly history. On very large scales this tracer bias results in a constant offset in the clustering amplitude, known as linear bias. Towards smaller nonlinear scales, this is no longer the case and tracer bias becomes a complicated function of scale and time. We focus on tracer bias centred on cosmic voids, depressions of the density field that spatially dominate the universe. We consider three types of tracers: galaxies, galaxy clusters and AGN, extracted from the hydrodynamical simulation Magneticum Pathfinder. In contrast to common clustering statistics that focus on auto-correlations of tracers, we find that void-tracer cross-correlations are successfully described by a linear-bias relation. The tracer-density profile of voids can thus be related to their matter-density profile by a single number. We show that it coincides with the linear tracer bias extracted from the large-scale auto-correlation function and expectations from theory, if sufficiently large voids are considered. For smaller voids we observe a shift towards higher values. This has important consequences on cosmological parameter inference, as the problem of unknown tracer bias is alleviated up to a constant number. The smallest scales in existing datasets become accessible to simpler models, providing numerous modes of the density field that have been disregarded so far, but may help to further reduce statistical errors in constraining cosmology.
  • We present a case study of a early-type galaxy (ETG) hosting a kinematically distinct core (KDC) formed in a binary high resolution 1:1 spiral galaxy merger simulation. The runtime of the simulation is pushed up to 10Gyr to follow the complete evolution of various physical properties. To investigate the origin of the KDC, the stellar component residing within the KDC is dissected, revealing that the rotational signal is purely generated by stars that belong to the KDC for at least 0.5Gyr and are newly formed during the merging process. Following the orientation of the total stellar angular momentum of the KDC, we show that it performs a motion comparable to the precession of a gyroscope in a gravitational potential. We draw the conclusion that the motion of the KDC is a superposition of an intrinsic rotation and a global precession that gets gradually damped over cosmic time. Finally, the stability of the KDC over the complete runtime of the simulation is investigated by tracing the evolution of the widely used $\lambda_{R}$ parameter and the misalignment angle distribution. We find that the KDC is stable for about 3Gyr after the merger and subsequently disperses completely on a timescale of ~1.5Gyr.
  • Metals are ideal tracers of the baryonic cycle within halos. Their composition is a fossil record connecting the evolution of the various stellar components of galaxies to the interaction with the environment by in- and outflows. The Magneticum simulations allow to study halos across a large range of masses and environments, from massive galaxy clusters containing hundreds of galaxies down to isolated field galaxies. They include a detailed treatment of the chemo-energetic feedback from the stellar component and its evolution as well as feedback from the evolution of supermassive black holes. Following the detailed evolution of various metal species and their relative composition due to continuing enrichment of the IGM and ICM by SNIa, SNII and AGB winds of the evolving stellar population reveals the complex interplay of local star formation processes, mixing, global baryonic flows, secular galactic evolution and environmental processes. We present results from the Magneticum simulations on the chemical properties of simulated galaxies and galaxy clusters, carefully comparing them to observations. We show that the simulations already reach a very high level of realism within their complex descriptions of the chemo-energetic feedback, successfully reproducing a large number of observed properties and scaling relations. Our simulated galaxies clearly indicate that there are no strong secondary parameters (like star formation rates at fixed redshift) driving the scatter in these scaling relations. The remaining differences clearly point to detailed physical processes which have to be included into future simulations.
  • Redshift-space clustering anisotropies caused by cosmic peculiar velocities provide a powerful probe to test the gravity theory on large scales. However, to extract unbiased physical constraints, the clustering pattern has to be modelled accurately, taking into account the effects of non-linear dynamics at small scales, and properly describing the link between the selected cosmic tracers and the underlying dark matter field. We use a large hydrodynamic simulation to investigate how the systematic error on the linear growth rate, $f$, caused by model uncertainties, depends on sample selections and comoving scales. Specifically, we measure the redshift-space two-point correlation function of mock samples of galaxies, galaxy clusters and Active Galactic Nuclei, extracted from the Magneticum simulation, in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 2, and adopting different sample selections. We estimate $f\sigma_8$ by modelling both the monopole and the full two-dimensional anisotropic clustering, using the dispersion model. We find that the systematic error on $f\sigma_8$ depends significantly on the range of scales considered for the fit. If the latter is kept fixed, the error depends on both redshift and sample selection, due to the scale-dependent impact of non-linearities, if not properly modelled. On the other hand, we show that it is possible to get unbiased constraints on $f\sigma_8$ provided that the analysis is restricted to a proper range of scales, that depends non trivially on the properties of the sample. This can have a strong impact on multiple tracers analyses, and when combining catalogues selected at different redshifts.
  • In the past years several authors studied the abundance of satellites around galaxies in order to better estimate the halo masses of host galaxies. To investigate this connection, we analyze galaxies with $M_\mathrm{star}\geq\,10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$ from the hydrodynamical cosmological simulation Magneticum. We find that the satellite fraction of centrals is independent of their morphology. With the exception of very massive galaxies at low redshift, our results do not support the assumption that the dark matter (DM) haloes of spheroidal galaxies are significantly more massive than those of disc galaxies at fixed $M_\mathrm{star}$. We show that the density-morphology-relation starts to build up at $z\sim2$ and is independent of the star-formation properties of central galaxies. We conclude that environmental quenching is more important for satellites than for centrals. Our simulations indicate that conformity is already in place at $z=2$, where formation redshift and current star-formation rate (SFR) of central and satellite galaxies correlate. Centrals with low SFRs have formed earlier (at fixed $M_\mathrm{star}$) while centrals with high SFR formed later, with typical formation redshifts well in agreement with observations. However, we confirm the recent observations that the apparent number of satellites of spheroidal galaxies is significantly larger than for disc galaxies. This difference completely originates from the inclusion of companion galaxies, i.e. galaxies that do not sit in the potential minimum of a DM halo. Thus, due to the density-morphological-relation the number of satellites is not a good tracer for the halo mass, unless samples are restricted to the central galaxies of DM haloes.
  • In spring 2015, the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (Leibniz-Rechenzentrum, LRZ), installed their new Peta-Scale System SuperMUC Phase2. Selected users were invited for a 28 day extreme scale-out block operation during which they were allowed to use the full system for their applications. The following projects participated in the extreme scale-out workshop: BQCD (Quantum Physics), SeisSol (Geophysics, Seismics), GPI-2/GASPI (Toolkit for HPC), Seven-League Hydro (Astrophysics), ILBDC (Lattice Boltzmann CFD), Iphigenie (Molecular Dynamic), FLASH (Astrophysics), GADGET (Cosmological Dynamics), PSC (Plasma Physics), waLBerla (Lattice Boltzmann CFD), Musubi (Lattice Boltzmann CFD), Vertex3D (Stellar Astrophysics), CIAO (Combustion CFD), and LS1-Mardyn (Material Science). The projects were allowed to use the machine exclusively during the 28 day period, which corresponds to a total of 63.4 million core-hours, of which 43.8 million core-hours were used by the applications, resulting in a utilization of 69%. The top 3 users were using 15.2, 6.4, and 4.7 million core-hours, respectively.
  • We calculate the one-point probability density distribution functions (PDF) and the power spectra of the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ and kSZ) effects and the mean Compton Y parameter using the Magneticum Pathfinder simulations, state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of a large cosmological volume of (896 Mpc/h)^3. These simulations follow in detail the thermal and chemical evolution of the intracluster medium as well as the evolution of super-massive black holes and their associated feedback processes. We construct full-sky maps of tSZ and kSZ from the light-cones out to z=0.17, and one realization of 8.8x8.8 degree wide, deep light-cone out to z=5.2. The local universe at z<0.027 is simulated by a constrained realisation. The tail of the one-point PDF of tSZ from the deep light-cone follows a power-law shape with an index of -3.2. Once convolved with the effective beam of Planck, it agrees with the PDF measured by Planck. The predicted tSZ power spectrum agrees with that of the Planck data at all multipoles up to l~1000, once the calculations are scaled to the Planck 2015 cosmological parameters with \Omega_m=0.308 and \sigma_8=0.8149. Consistent with the results in the literature, however, we continue to find the tSZ power spectrum at l=3000 that is significantly larger than that estimated from the high-resolution ground-based data. The simulation predicts the mean fluctuating Compton Y value of <Y>=1.18x10^{-6} for \Omega_m=0.272 and \sigma_8=0.809. Nearly half (~ 5x10^{-7}) of the signal comes from halos below a virial mass of 10^{13}M_\odot/h. Scaling this to the Planck 2015 parameters, we find <Y>=1.57x10^{-6}. The PDF and the power spectrum of kSZ from our simulation agree broadly with the previous work.
  • We present, for the first time in the literature, a full reconstruction of the total (linear and non-linear) ISW/Rees-Sciama effect in the presence of massive neutrinos, together with its cross-correlations with CMB-lensing and weak-lensing signals. The present analyses make use of all-sky maps extracted via ray-tracing across the gravitational potential distribution provided by the "Dark Energy and Massive Neutrino Universe" (DEMNUni) project, a set of large-volume, high-resolution cosmological N-body simulations, where neutrinos are treated as separate collisionless particles. We correctly recover, at $1-2\%$ accuracy, the linear predictions from CAMB. Concerning the CMB-lensing and weak-lensing signals, we also recover, with similar accuracy, the signal predicted by Boltzmann codes, once non-linear neutrino corrections to Halofit are accounted for. Interestingly, in the ISW/Rees-Sciama signal, and its cross correlation with lensing, we find an excess of power with respect to the massless case, due to free streaming neutrinos, roughly at the transition scale between the linear and non-linear regimes. The excess is $\sim 5-10\%$ at $l\sim 100$ for the ISW/Rees-Sciama auto power spectrum, depending on the total neutrino mass $M_\nu$, and becomes a factor of $\sim 4$ for $M_\nu=0.3$ eV, at $l\sim 600$, for the ISW/Rees-Sciama cross power with CMB-lensing. This effect should be taken into account for the correct estimation of the CMB temperature bispectrum in the presence of massive neutrinos.
  • We extend the description of the isotropic and anisotropic random component of the small-scale magnetic field within the existing magnetic field model of the Milky Way from Jansson&Farrar, by including random realizations of the small-scale component. Using a magnetic-field power spectrum with Gaussian random fields, the NE2001 model for the thermal electrons and the Galactic cosmic-ray electron distribution from the current GALPROP model we derive full-sky maps for the total and polarized synchrotron intensity as well as the Faraday rotation-measure distribution. While previous work assumed that small-scale fluctuations average out along the line-of-sight or which only computed ensemble averages of random fields, we show that these fluctuations need to be carefully taken into account. Comparing with observational data we obtain not only good agreement with 408 MHz total and WMAP7 22 GHz polarized intensity emission maps, but also an improved agreement with Galactic foreground rotation-measure maps and power spectra, whose amplitude and shape strongly depend on the parameters of the random field. We demonstrate that a correlation length of ~220pc (50pc being a 5\sigma lower limit) is needed to match the slope of the observed power spectrum of Galactic foreground rotation-measure maps. Using multiple realizations allows us also to infer errors on individual observables. We find that previously-used amplitudes for random and anisotropic random magnetic field components need to be rescaled by factors of ~0.3 and 0.6 to account for the new small-scale contributions. Our model predicts a rotation measure of -2.8\pm7.1 rad/m^2 and 4.4\pm11.0 rad/m^2 for the north and south Galactic poles respectively, in good agreement with observations. Applying our model to deflections of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays we infer a mean deflection of ~3.5\pm1.1 degree for 60 EeV protons arriving from CenA.
  • The outer stellar halos of galaxies contain vital information about the formation history of galaxies, since the relaxation timescales in the outskirts are long enough to keep the memory, while the information about individual formation events in the central parts has long been lost due to mixing, star formation and relaxation. To unveil some of the information encoded in these faint outer halo regions, we study the stellar outskirts of galaxies selected from a fully hydrodynamical high resolution cosmological simulation, called Magneticum. We find that the density profiles of the outer stellar halos of galaxies over a broad mass range can be well described by an Einasto profile. For a fixed total mass range, the free parameters of the Einasto fits are closely correlated. Galaxies which had more (dry) merger events tend to have lesser curved outer stellar halos, however, we find no indication that the amount of curvature is correlated with galaxy morphology. The Einasto-like shape of the outer stellar halo densities can also explain the observed differences between the Milky Way and Andromeda outer stellar halos.
  • In the last few years, it became possible to observationally resolve galaxies with two distinct nuclei in their centre. For separations smaller than 10kpc, dual and offset active galactic nuclei (AGN) are distinguished: in dual AGN, both nuclei are active, whereas in offset AGN only one nucleus is active. To study the origin of such AGN pairs, we employ a cosmological, hydrodynamic simulation with a large volume of (182Mpc)^3 from the set of Magneticum Pathfinder Simulations. The simulation self-consistently produces 35 resolved black hole (BH) pairs at redshift z=2, with a comoving distance smaller than 10kpc. 14 of them are offset AGN and nine are dual AGN, resulting in a fraction of (1.2 \pm 0.3)% AGN pairs with respect to the total number of AGN. In this paper, we discuss fundamental differences between the BH and galaxy properties of dual AGN, offset AGN and inactive BH pairs and investigate their different triggering mechanisms. We find that in dual AGN the BHs have similar masses and the corresponding BH from the less massive progenitor galaxy always accretes with a higher Eddington ratio. In contrast, in offset AGN the active BH is typically more massive than its non-active counterpart. Furthermore, dual AGN in general accrete more gas from the intergalactic medium than offset AGN and non-active BH pairs. This highlights that merger events, particularly minor mergers, do not necessarily lead to strong gas inflows and thus, do not always drive strong nuclear activity.
  • (abridged) We analyse the clustering features of Large Scale Structures (LSS) in the presence of massive neutrinos, employing a set of large-volume, high-resolution cosmological N-body simulations, where neutrinos are treated as a separate collisionless fluid. The volume of 8$\cGpc$, combined with a resolution of about $8\times 10^{10}\Ms$ for the cold dark matter (CDM) component, represents a significant improvement over previous N-body simulations in massive neutrino cosmologies. We show that most of the nonlinear evolution is generated exclusively by the CDM component. We find that accounting only for the nonlinear evolution of the CDM power spectrum allows to recover the total matter power spectrum with the same accuracy as the massless case. Indeed, we show that, the most recent version of the \halofit\ formula calibrated on $\Lambda$CDM simulations can be applied directly to the linear CDM power spectrum without requiring additional fitting parameters in the massive case. As a second step, we study the abundance and clustering properties of CDM halos, confirming that, in massive neutrino cosmologies, the proper definition of the halo bias should be made with respect to the {\em cold} rather than the {\em total} matter distribution, as recently shown in the literature. Here we extend these results to the redshift space, finding that, when accounting for massive neutrinos, an improper definition of the linear bias can lead to a systematic error of about 1-$2 \%$ in the determination of the linear growth rate from anisotropic clustering. This result is quite important if we consider that future spectroscopic galaxy surveys, as \eg\ Euclid, are expected to measure the linear growth-rate with statistical errors less than about $3 \%$ at $z\lesssim1$.
  • We use a set of hydrodynamical (Hydro) and dark matter only (DMonly) simulations to calibrate the halo mass function (HMF). We explore the impact of baryons, propose an improved parametrization for spherical overdensity masses and identify differences between our DMonly HMF and previously published HMFs. We use the \textit{Magneticum} simulations, which are well suited because of their accurate treatment of baryons, high resolution, and large cosmological volumes of up to $(3818~\textrm{Mpc})^3$. Baryonic effects globally decrease the masses of galaxy clusters, which, at a given mass, results in a decrease of their number density. This effect vanishes at high redshift $z\sim2$ and for high masses $M_{200\textrm m}\gtrsim10^{14}M\odot$. We perform cosmological analyses of three idealized approximations to the cluster surveys by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), \textit{Planck}, and eROSITA. We pursue two main questions: (1) What is the impact of baryons? -- For the SPT-like and the \textit{Planck}-like samples, the impact of baryons on cosmological results is negligible. In the eROSITA-like case, however, neglecting the baryonic impact leads to an underestimate of $\Omega_\textrm m$ by about $0.01$, which is comparable to the expected uncertainty from eROSITA. (2) How does our DMonly HMF compare with previous work? -- For the \textit{Planck}-like sample, results obtained using our DMonly HMF are shifted by $\Delta(\sigma_8)\simeq\Delta(\sigma_8(\Omega_\textrm m/0.27)^{0.3})\simeq0.02$ with respect to results obtained using the Tinker et al. (2008) fit. This suggests that using our HMF would shift results from \textit{Planck} clusters toward better agreement with CMB anisotropy measurements. Finally, we discuss biases that can be introduced through inadequate HMF parametrizations that introduce false cosmological sensitivity.
  • By means of zoom-in hydrodynamic simulations we quantify the amount of neutral hydrogen (HI) hosted by groups and clusters of galaxies. Our simulations, which are based on an improved formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), include radiative cooling, star formation, metal enrichment and supernova feedback, and can be split in two different groups, depending on whether feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is turned on or off. Simulations are analyzed to account for HI self-shielding and the presence of molecular hydrogen. We find that the mass in neutral hydrogen of dark matter halos monotonically increases with the halo mass and can be well described by a power-law of the form $M_{\rm HI}(M,z)\propto M^{3/4}$. Our results point out that AGN feedback reduces both the total halo mass and its HI mass, although it is more efficient in removing HI. We conclude that AGN feedback reduces the neutral hydrogen mass of a given halo by $\sim50\%$, with a weak dependence on halo mass and redshift. The spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen within halos is also affected by AGN feedback, whose effect is to decrease the fraction of HI that resides in the halo inner regions. By extrapolating our results to halos not resolved in our simulations we derive astrophysical implications from the measurements of $\Omega_{\rm HI}(z)$: halos with circular velocities larger than $\sim25~{\rm km/s}$ are needed to host HI in order to reproduce observations. We find that only the model with AGN feedback is capable of reproducing the value of $\Omega_{\rm HI}b_{\rm HI}$ derived from available 21cm intensity mapping observations.
  • We present a model for the seeding and evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies by supernovae (SN). SN explosions during galaxy assembly provide seed fields, which are subsequently amplified by compression, shear flows and random motions. Our model explains the origin of microG magnetic fields within galactic structures. We implement our model in the MHD version of the cosmological simulation code Gadget-3 and couple it with a multi-phase description of the interstellar medium. We perform simulations of Milky Way-like galactic halo formation and analyze the distribution and strength of the magnetic field. We investigate the intrinsic rotation measure (RM) evolution and find RM values exceeding 1000 rad/m*m at high redshifts and RM values around 10 rad/m*m at present-day. We compare our simulations to a limited set of observational data points and find encouraging similarities. In our model, galactic magnetic fields are a natural consequence of the very basic processes of star formation and galaxy assembly.