• Topological superconductors, whose edge hosts Majorana bound states or Majorana fermions that obey non-Abelian statistics, can be used for low-decoherence quantum computations. Most of the proposed topological superconductors are realized with spin-helical states through proximity effect to BCS superconductors. However, such approaches are difficult for further studies and applications because of the low transition temperatures and complicated hetero-structures. Here by using high-resolution spin-resolved and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we discover that the iron-based superconductor FeTe1-xSex (x = 0.45, Tc = 14.5 K) hosts Dirac-cone type spin-helical surface states at Fermi level, which open an s-wave SC gap below Tc. Our study proves that the surface states of FeTe0.55Se0.45 are 2D topologically superconducting, and thus provides a simple and possibly high-Tc platform for realizing Majorana fermions.
  • Topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs) exhibit bulk Dirac cones protected by time reversal and crystal symmetry, as well as surface states originating from non-trivial topology. While there is a manifold possible onset of superconducting order in such systems, few observations of intrinsic superconductivity have so far been reported for TDSs. We observe evidence for a TDS phase in FeTe$_{1-x}$Se$_x$ ($x$ = 0.45), one of the high transition temperature ($T_c$) iron-based superconductors. In angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) and transport experiments, we find spin-polarized states overlapping with the bulk states on the (001) surface, and linear magnetoresistance (MR) starting from 6 T. Combined, this strongly suggests the existence of a TDS phase, which is confirmed by theoretical calculations. In total, the topological electronic states in Fe(Te,Se) provide a promising high $T_c$ platform to realize multiple topological superconducting phases.
  • Topological insulators/semimetals and unconventional iron-based superconductors have attracted major attentions in condensed matter physics in the past 10 years. However, there is little overlap between these two fields, although the combination of topological states and superconducting states will produce more exotic topologically superconducting states and Majorana bound states (MBS), a promising candidate for realizing topological quantum computations. With the progress in laser-based spin-resolved and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with very high energy- and momentum-resolution, we directly resolved the topological insulator (TI) phase and topological Dirac semimetal (TDS) phase near Fermi level ($E_F$) in the iron-based superconductor Li(Fe,Co)As. The TI and TDS phases can be separately tuned to $E_F$ by Co doping, allowing a detailed study of different superconducting topological states in the same material. Together with the topological states in Fe(Te,Se), our study shows the ubiquitous coexistence of superconductivity and multiple topological phases in iron-based superconductors, and opens a new age for the study of high-Tc iron-based superconductors and topological superconductivity.
  • We determine the band structure and spin texture of WTe2 by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES). With the support of first-principles calculations, we reveal the existence of spin polarization of both the Fermi arc surface states and bulk Fermi pockets. Our results support WTe2 to be a type-II Weyl semimetal candidate and provide important information to understand its extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance.
  • Interference of spin-up and spin-down eigenstates depicts spin rotation of electrons, which is a fundamental concept of quantum mechanics and accepts technological challenges for the electrical spin manipulation. Here, we visualize this coherent spin physics through laser spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on a spin-orbital entangled surface-state of a topological insulator. It is unambiguously revealed that the linearly polarized laser can simultaneously excite spin-up and spin-down states and these quantum spin-basis are coherently superposed in photoelectron states. The superposition and the resulting spin rotation is arbitrary manipulated by the direction of the laser field. Moreover, the full observation of the spin rotation displays the phase of the quantum states. This presents a new facet of laser-photoemission technique for investigation of quantum spin physics opening new possibilities in the field of quantum spintronic applications.
  • We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser ($h\nu$= 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7$^\circ$ angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.
  • A Weyl semimetal is a new state of matter that host Weyl fermions as quasiparticle excitations. The Weyl fermions at zero energy correspond to points of bulk band degeneracy, Weyl nodes, which are separated in momentum space and are connected only through the crystal's boundary by an exotic Fermi arc surface state. We experimentally measure the spin polarization of the Fermi arcs in the first experimentally discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. Our spin data, for the first time, reveal that the Fermi arcs' spin polarization magnitude is as large as 80% and possesses a spin texture that is completely in-plane. Moreover, we demonstrate that the chirality of the Weyl nodes in TaAs cannot be inferred by the spin texture of the Fermi arcs. The observed non-degenerate property of the Fermi arcs is important for the establishment of its exact topological nature, which reveal that spins on the arc form a novel type of 2D matter. Additionally, the nearly full spin polarization we observed (~80%) may be useful in spintronic applications.