• The photoelectrodissolution of n-type silicon constitutes a convenient model system to study the nonlinear dynamics of oscillatory media. On the silicon surface, a silicon oxide layer forms. In the lateral direction, the thickness of this layer is not uniform. Rather, several spatio-temporal patterns in the oxide layer emerge spontaneously, ranging from cluster patterns and turbulence to quite peculiar dynamics like chimera states. Introducing a nonlinear global coupling in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation allows us to identify this nonlinear coupling as the essential ingredient to describe the patterns found in the experiments. The nonlinear global coupling is designed in such a way, as to capture an important, experimentally observed feature: the spatially averaged oxide-layer thickness shows nearly harmonic oscillations. Simulations of the modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation capture the experimental dynamics very well.
  • We report a novel mechanism for the formation of chimera states, a peculiar spatiotemporal pattern with coexisting synchronized and incoherent domains found in ensembles of identical oscillators. Considering Stuart-Landau oscillators we demonstrate that a nonlinear global coupling can induce this symmetry breaking. We find chimera states also in a spatially extended system, a modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. This theoretical prediction is validated with an oscillatory electrochemical system, the electrooxidation of silicon, where the spontaneous formation of chimeras is observed without any external feedback control.