• Stars and planets are formed inside dense interstellar molecular clouds, by processes imprinted on the 3-dimensional (3D) morphology of the clouds. Determining the 3D structure of interstellar clouds remains challenging, due to projection effects and difficulties measuring their extent along the line of sight. We report the detection of normal vibrational modes in the isolated interstellar cloud Musca, allowing determination of the 3D physical dimensions of the cloud. Musca is found to be vibrating globally, with the characteristic modes of a sheet viewed edge-on, not a filament as previously supposed. We reconstruct the physical properties of Musca through 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations, reproducing the observed normal modes and confirming a sheet-like morphology.
  • We present a 3 mm spectral line and continuum survey of L1451 in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. These observations are from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), which also imaged Barnard 1, NGC 1333, Serpens Main and Serpens South. L1451 is the survey region with the lowest level of star formation activity---it contains no confirmed protostars. HCO+, HCN, and N2H+ (J=1-0) are all detected throughout the region, with HCO+ the most spatially widespread, and molecular emission seen toward 90% of the area above N(H_2) column densities of 1.9x10^21 cm^-2. HCO+ has the broadest velocity dispersion, near 0.3 km/s on average, compared to ~0.15 km/s for the other molecules, thus representing a range from supersonic to subsonic gas motions. Our non-binary dendrogram analysis reveals that the dense gas traced by each molecule has similar hierarchical structure, and that gas surrounding the candidate first hydrostatic core (FHSC), L1451-mm, and other previously detected single-dish continuum clumps have similar hierarchical structure; this suggests that different sub-regions of L1451 are fragmenting on the pathway to forming young stars. We determined the three-dimensional morphology of the largest detectable dense gas structures to be relatively ellipsoidal compared to other CLASSy regions, which appeared more flattened at largest scales. A virial analysis shows the most centrally condensed dust structures are likely unstable against collapse. Additionally, we identify a new spherical, centrally condensed N2H+ feature that could be a new FHSC candidate. The overall results suggest L1451 is a young region starting to form its generation of stars within turbulent, hierarchical structures.
  • Recent Planck results have shown that radiation from the cosmic microwave background passes through foregrounds in which aligned dust grains produce polarized dust emission, even in regions of the sky with the lowest level of dust emission. One of the most commonly used ways to remove the dust foreground is to extrapolate the polarized dust emission signal from frequencies where it dominates (e.g., ~ 350 GHz) to frequencies commonly targeted by cosmic microwave background experiments (e.g., ~150 GHz). In this paper, we describe an interstellar medium effect that can lead to decorrelation of the dust emission polarization pattern between different frequencies due to multiple contributions along the line of sight. Using a simple 2-cloud model we show that there are two conditions under which this decorrelation can be large: (a) the ratio of polarized intensities between the two clouds changes between the two frequencies; (b) the magnetic fields between the two clouds contributing along a line of sight are significantly misaligned. In such cases, the 350 GHz polarized sky map is not predictive of that at 150 GHz. We propose a possible correction for this effect, using information from optopolarimetric surveys of dichroicly absorbed starlight.
  • We present observations of N2H+(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HCN(1-0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 square arcminutes of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of 7 arcsecs. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N2H+(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of 0.2 pc and widths of 0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.
  • Comparison of linewidths of spectral line profiles of ions and neutral molecules have been recently used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field in turbulent star-forming regions. However, the ion (HCO+) and neutral (HCN) species used in such studies may not be necessarily co-evolving at every scale and density and may thus not trace the same regions. Here, we use coupled chemical/dynamical models of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores including non-equilibrium chemistry, with and without magnetic fields, to study the spatial distribution of HCO+ and HCN, which have been used in observations of spectral linewidth differences to date. In addition, we seek new ion-neutral pairs that are good candidates for such observations because they have similar evolution and are approximately co-spatial in our models. We identify three such good candidate pairs: HCO+/NO, HCO+/CO, and NO+/NO.
  • We study the effect that non-equilibrium chemistry in dynamical models of collapsing molecular cloud cores has on measurements of the magnetic field in these cores, the degree of ionization, and the mean molecular weight of ions. We find that OH and CN, usually used in Zeeman observations of the line-of-sight magnetic field, have an abundance that decreases toward the center of the core much faster than the density increases. As a result, Zeeman observations tend to sample the outer layers of the core and consistently underestimate the core magnetic field. The degree of ionization follows a complicated dependence on the number density at central densities up to 10^5 cm^{-3} for magnetic models and 10^6 cm^{-3} in non-magnetic models. At higher central densities the scaling approaches a power-law with a slope of -0.6 and a normalization which depends on the cosmic-ray ionization rate {\zeta} and the temperature T as ({\zeta}T)^1/2. The mean molecular weight of ions is systematically lower than the usually assumed value of 20 - 30, and, at high densities, approaches a value of 3 due to the asymptotic dominance of the H3+ ion. This significantly lower value implies that ambipolar diffusion operates faster.
  • We combine dynamical and non-equilibrium chemical modeling of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores, and explore the evolution of molecular abundances in the contracting core. We model both magnetic cores, with varying degrees of initial magnetic support, and non-magnetic cores, with varying collapse delay times. We explore, through a parameter study, the competing effects of various model parameters in the evolving molecular abundances, including the elemental C/O ratio, the temperature, and the cosmic-ray ionization rate. We find that different models show their largest quantitative differences at the center of the core, whereas the outer layers, which evolve slower, have abundances which are severely degenerate among different dynamical models. There is a large range of possible abundance values for different models at a fixed evolutionary stage (central density), which demonstrates the large potential of chemical differentiation in prestellar cores. However, degeneracies among different models, compounded with uncertainties induced by other model parameters, make it difficult to discriminate among dynamical models. To address these difficulties, we identify abundance ratios between particular molecules, the measurement of which would have maximal potential for discrimination among the different models examined here. In particular, we find that the ratios between NH3 and CO; NH2 and CO; NH3 and HCO+ are sensitive to the evolutionary timescale, and that the ratio between HCN and OH is sensitive to the C/O ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that measurements of the central deviation (central depletion or enhancement) of abundances of certain molecules are good indicators of the dynamics of the core.
  • The tight relation of star formation with molecular gas indicated by observations and assumed in recent models implies that the efficiency with which galaxies convert their gas into stars depends on gas metallicity. This is because the abundance of molecular hydrogen is sensitive to the abundance of dust, which catalyzes the formation of H_2 and helps to shield it from dissociating radiation. In this study we point out that in the absence of significant pre-enrichment by Population III stars forming out of zero metallicity gas, such H_2-based star formation is expected to leave an imprint in the form of bi-modality in the metallicity distribution among dwarf galaxies and in the metallicity distribution of stars within individual galaxies. The bi-modality arises because when gas metallicity (and dust abundance) is low, formation of molecular gas is inefficient, the gas consumption time scale is long, and star formation and metal enrichment proceed slowly. When metallicity reaches a critical threshold value star formation and enrichment accelerate, which leads to rapid increase in both stellar mass and metallicity of galaxies. We demonstrate this process both using a simple analytical model and full cosmological simulations. In contrast, observed metallicity distributions of dwarf galaxies or stars within them are not bi-modal. We argue that this discrepancy points to substantial early stochastic pre-enrichment by population III stars to levels Z ~ 0.01 Z_sun in dense, star forming regions of early galaxies.
  • We propose a simple analytical method for estimating the central volume density of prestellar molecular cloud cores from their column density profiles. Prestellar cores feature a flat central part of the column density and volume density profiles of the same size indicating the existence of a uniform density inner region. The size of this region is set by the thermal pressure force which depends only on the central volume density and temperature of the core, and can provide a direct measurement of the central volume density. Thus a simple length measurement can immediately yield a central density estimate independent of any dynamical model for the core and without the need for fitting. Using the radius at which the column density is 90% of the central value as an estimate of the size of the flat inner part of the column density profile yields an estimate of the central volume density within a factor of 2 for well resolved cores.
  • We investigate the effect of the Milky Way's magnetic field in star forming regions using archived 350 micron polarization data on 52 Galactic star formation regions from the Hertz polarimeter module. The polarization angles and percentages for individual telescope beams were combined in order to produce a large-scale average for each source and for complexes of sources. In more than 80% of the sources, we find a meaningful mean magnetic field direction, implying the existence of an ordered magnetic field component at the scale of these sources. The average polarization angles were analyzed with respect to the Galactic coordinates in order to test for correlations between polarization percentage, polarization angle, intensity, and Galactic location. No correlation was found, which suggests that the magnetic field in dense molecular clouds is decoupled from the large-scale Galactic magnetic field. Finally, we show that the magnetic field directions in the complexes are consistent with a random distribution on the sky.
  • We present results from numerical simulations of the cooling-core cluster A2199 produced by the two-dimensional (2-D) resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code MACH2. In our simulations we explore the effect of anisotropic thermal conduction on the energy balance of the system. The results from idealized cases in 2-D axisymmetric geometry underscore the importance of the initial plasma density in ICM simulations, especially the near-core values since the radiation cooling rate is proportional to ${n_e}^2$. Heat conduction is found to be non-effective in preventing catastrophic cooling in this cluster. In addition we performed 2-D planar MHD simulations starting from initial conditions deliberately violating both thermal balance and hydrostatic equilibrium in the ICM, to assess contributions of the convective terms in the energy balance of the system against anisotropic thermal conduction. We find that in this case work done by the pressure on the plasma can dominate the early evolution of the internal energy over anisotropic thermal conduction in the presence of subsonic flows, thereby reducing the impact of the magnetic field. Deviations from hydrostatic equilibrium near the cluster core may be associated with transient activity of a central active galactic nucleus and/or remnant dynamical activity in the ICM and warrant further study in three dimensions.
  • We had recently re-analyzed in a self-consistent way OH-Zeeman observations in four molecular-cloud envelopes and we had shown that, contrary to claims by Crutcher et al., there is no evidence that the mass-to-flux ratio decreases from the envelopes to the cores of these clouds. The key difference between our data analysis and the earlier one by Crutcher et al. is the relaxation of the overly restrictive assumption made by Crutcher et al, that the magnetic field strength is independent of position in each of the four envelopes. In a more recent paper, Crutcher et al. (1) claim that our analysis is not self-consistent, in that it misses a cosine factor, and (2) present new arguments to support their contention that the magnetic-field strength is indeed independent of position in each of the four envelopes. We show that the claim of the missing cosine factor is false, that the new arguments contain even more serious problems than the Crutcher et al. original data analysis, and we present new observational evidence, independent of the OH-Zeeman data, that suggests significant variations in the magnetic-field strength in the four cloud envelopes.
  • The ambipolar-diffusion theory of star formation predicts the formation of fragments in molecular clouds with mass-to-flux ratios greater than that of the parent-cloud envelope. By contrast, scenarios of turbulence-induced fragmentation do not yield such a robust prediction. Based on this property, Crutcher et al. (2009) proposed an observational test that could potentially discriminate between fragmentation theories. However, the analysis applied to the data severely restricts the discriminative power of the test: the authors conclude that they can only constrain what they refer to as the "idealized" ambipolar-diffusion theory that assumes initially straight-parallel magnetic field lines in the parent cloud. We present an original, self-consistent analysis of the same data taking into account the nonuniformity of the magnetic field in the cloud envelopes, which is suggested by the data themselves, and we discuss important geometrical effects that must be accounted for in using this test. We show quantitatively that the quality of current data does not allow for a strong conclusion about any fragmentation theory. Given the discriminative potential of the test, we urge for more and better-quality data.
  • We describe a phenomenological model for molecular hydrogen formation suited for applications in galaxy formation simulations, which includes on-equilibrium formation of molecular hydrogen on dust and approximate treatment of both its self-shielding and shielding by dust from the dissociating UV radiation. The model is applicable in simulations in which individual star forming regions - the giant molecular complexes - can be identified (resolution of tens of pc) and their mean internal density estimated reliably, even if internal structure is not resolved. In agreement with previous studies, calculations based on our model show that the transition from atomic to fully molecular phase depends primarily on the metallicity, which we assume is directly related to the dust abundance, and clumpiness of the interstellar medium. The clumpiness simply boosts the formation rate of molecular hydrogen, while dust serves both as a catalyst of molecular hydrogen formation and as an additional shielding from dissociating UV radiation. The upshot is that it is difficult to form fully-shielded giant molecular clouds while gas metallicity is low. However, once the gas is enriched to Z ~ 0.01-0.1 solar, the subsequent star formation and enrichment can proceed at a much faster rate. This may keep star formation efficiency in the low-mass, low-metallicity progenitors of galaxies very low for a certain period of time with the effect similar to a strong "feedback" mechanism. [abridged]
  • Until recently, many of the dozens of quantitative predictions of the ambipolar-diffusion theory of gravitational fragmentation (or core formation) of molecular clouds have been confirmed by observations and, just as importantly, no prediction has been contradicted by any observation. A recent paper, however, claims that measurements of the variation of the mass-to-flux ratio from envelopes to cores in four clouds {\it de}creases, in direct contrast to a prediction of the theory but in agreement with turbulent fragmentation (in the absence of gravity) and, therefore, the ambipolar-diffusion theory is invalid (Crutcher et al 2008). The paper treats magnetic-field nondetections as if they were detections. We show that the analysis of the data is fundamentally flawed and, moreover, the comparison with the theoretical prediction ignores major geometrical effects, suggested by the data themselves if taken at face value. The magnetic fluxes of the envelopes are also miscalculated. We carry out a proper error analysis and treatment of the nondetections and we show that the claimed measurement of the variation of the mass-to-flux ratio from envelopes to cores is not valid, no contradiction with the ambipolar-diffusion theory can be concluded, and no theory can be tested on the basis of these data.
  • Using interferometric data from BIMA observations, combined with detailed modeling in Fourier space of the physical structures predicted by models, we constrain the circumstellar envelope parameters for four Class 0 young stellar objects, as well as their embedded circumstellar disks. The envelopes of these objects are still undergoing collapse, and theoretical collapse models can be compared to the observations. Since it has been suggested in a previous study that both the Larson-Penston and Shu similarity solutions underestimate the age of the system, we adopt Tassis & Mouschovias' model of the collapse process, which includes all relevant magnetic fields effects. The results of the model fitting show a good consistency between theory and data; furthermore, no age problem exists since the Tassis & Mouschovias' model is age independent for the first 255 kyr. Although the majority of the continuum dust emission arises from the circumstellar envelopes, these objects have well known outflows, which suggest the presence of circumstellar disks. At the highest resolution, most of the large-scale envelope emission is resolved out by interferometry, but the small-scale residual emission remains, making it difficult to observe only the compact disk component. By modeling the emission of the envelope and subtracting it from the total emission, we constrain the disk masses in our four systems to be comparable to or smaller than the typical disk masses for T Tauri systems.
  • Nearby dwarf galaxies exhibit tight correlations between their global stellar and dynamical properties, such as circular velocity, mass-to-light ratio, stellar mass, surface brightness, and metallicity. Such correlations have often been attributed to gas or metal-rich outflows driven by supernova energy feedback to the interstellar medium. We use high-resolution cosmological simulations of high-redshift galaxies with and without energy feedback, as well as analytic modeling, to investigate whether the observed correlations can arise without supernova-driven outflows. We find that the simulated dwarf galaxies exhibit correlations similar to those observed as early as z~10, regardless of whether supernova feedback is included. We also show that the correlations can be well reproduced by our analytic model that accounts for realistic gas inflow but assumes no outflows, and star formation rate obeying the Kennicutt-Schmidt law with a critical density threshold. We argue that correlations in simulated galaxies arise due to the increasingly inefficient conversion of gas into stars in low-mass dwarf galaxies rather than supernova-driven outflows. We also show that the decrease of the observed effective yield in low-mass objects, often used as an indicator of gas and metal outflows, can be reasonably reproduced in our simulations without outflows. We show that this trend can arise if a significant fraction of metals in small galaxies is spread to the outer regions of the halo outside the stellar extent via mixing. In this case the effective yield can be significantly underestimated if only metals within the stellar radius are taken into account. Measurements of gas metallicity in the outskirts of gaseous disks of dwarfs would thus provide a key test of such explanation.
  • The surface density of the star formation rate in different galaxies, as well as in different parts of a single galaxy, scales nonlinearly with the surface density of the total gas. This observationally established relation is known as the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law. The slope of the star formation law has been shown to change with the density of the gas against which the star formation rate is plotted. This dependence implies a nonlinear scaling between the dense gas and the total gas surface densities within galaxies. Here, we explore a possible interpretation of this scaling as a property of the geometry of the interstellar medium (ISM), and we find that it arises naturally if the topology of the ISM is multifractal. Under the additional assumption that, at very high densities, the star formation timescale is roughly constant, the star formation law itself can also be recovered as a consequence of the multifractal geometry of the ISM. The slope of the scaling depends on the width of the global probability density function (PDF), and is between 1.5 and 1.6 for wide PDFs relevant to high-mass systems, while it is higher for narrower PDFs appropriate for lower-mass dwarf galaxies, in agreement with observations.
  • We investigate the intrinsic shapes of starless cores in the Orion GMC, using the prestellar core sample of Nutter and Ward-Thompson (2007), which is based on submillimeter SCUBA data. We employ a maximum-likelihood method to reconstruct the intrinsic distribution of ellipsoid axial ratios from the axial ratios of projected plane-of-the-sky core ellipses. We find that, independently of the details of the assumed functional form of the distribution, there is a strong preference for oblate cores of finite thickness. Cores with varying finite degrees of triaxiality are a better fit than purely axisymmetric cores although cores close to axisymmetry are not excluded by the data. The incidence of prolate starless cores in Orion is found to be very infrequent. We also test the consistency of the observed data with a uniform distribution of intrinsic shapes, which is similar to those found in gravoturbulent fragmentation simulations. This distribution is excluded at the 0.1% level. These findings have important implications for theories of core formation within molecular clouds.
  • We formulate the problem of the formation of magnetically supercritical cores in magnetically subcritical parent molecular clouds, and the subsequent collapse of the cores to high densities, past the detachment of ions from magnetic field lines and into the opaque regime. We employ the six-fluid MHD equations, accounting for the effects of grains (negative, positive and neutral) including their inelastic collisions with other species. We do not assume that the magnetic flux is frozen in any of the charged species. We derive a generalized Ohm's law that explicitly distinguishes between flux advection (and the associated process of ambipolar diffusion) and Ohmic dissipation, in order to assess the contribution of each mechanism to the increase of the mass-to-flux ratio of the central parts of a collapsing core and possibly to the resolution of the magnetic flux problem of star formation. We show how our formulation is related to and can be transformed into the traditional, directional formulation of the generalized Ohm's law, and we derive formulae for the perpendicular, parallel and Hall conductivities entering the latter, which include, for the first time, the effect of inelastic collisions between grains. In addition, we present a general (valid in any geometry) solution for the velocities of charged species as functions of the velocity of the neutrals and of the effective flux velocity (which can in turn be calculated from the dynamics of the system and Faraday's law). The last two sets of formulae can be adapted for use in any general non-ideal MHD code to study phenomena beyond star formation in magnetic clouds. The results, including a detailed parameter study, are presented in two accompanying papers.
  • We follow the ambipolar-diffusion--driven formation and evolution of a fragment in a magnetically supported molecular cloud, until a hydrostatic protostellar core forms at its center. This problem was formulated in Paper I. We determine the density, velocity and magnetic field as functions of space and time, and the contribution of ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation to the resolution of the magnetic flux problem of star formation. The issue of whether the magnetic field ever decouples from the (neutral) matter is also addressed. We also find that the electrons do not decouple from the field lines before thermal ionization becomes important and recouples the magnetic field to the neutral matter. Ohmic dissipation becomes more effective than ambipolar diffusion as a flux reduction mechanism only at the highest densities (a few times 10^12 particles per cubic cm). In the high-density central parts of the core, the magnetic field acquires an almost spatially uniform structure, with a value that, at the end of the calculation (number density ~ 5 times 10^14 particles per cubic cm), is found to be in excellent agreement with meteoritic measurements of magnetic fields in the protosolar nebula. Outside the hydrostatic protostellar core, a concentration of magnetic flux (a "magnetic wall") forms, which gives rise to a magnetic shock. This magnetic shock is the precursor of the repeated shocks found by Tassis & Mouschovias (2005) which cause spasmodic accretion onto the hydrostatic core at later times.
  • In two previous papers we formulated and solved, for a fiducial set of free parameters, the problem of the formation and evolution of a magnetically supercritical core inside a magnetically subcritical parent cloud. In this paper we present a parameter study to assess the sensitivity of the results (1) to the density at which the equation of state becomes adiabatic; (2) to the initial mass-to-flux ratio of the parent cloud; and (3) to ionization by radioactive decay of different nuclei (40K and 26Al) at high densities (number density > 10^12 particles per cubic cm). We find that (1) the results depend only slightly on the density at which the onset of adiabaticity occurs; (2) memory of the initial mass-to-flux ratio is completely lost at late times, which emphasizes the relevance of this work, idependently of the adopted theory of core formation; and (3) the precise source of radioactive ionization alters the degree of attachment of the electrons to the field lines (at high densities), and the relative importance of ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation in reducing the magnetic flux of the protostar. The value of the magnetic field at the end of the runs is insensitive to the values of the free parameters and in excellent agreement with meteoritic measurements of the protosolar nebula magnetic field. The magnetic flux problem of star formation is resolved for at least strongly magnetic newborn stars. A complete detachment of the magnetic field from the matter is unlikely. The formation of a "magnetic wall" (with an associated magnetic shock) is independent of the assumed equation of state, although the process is enhanced and accelerated by the formation of a central hydrostatic core.
  • We revisit the problem of the star formation timescale and the ages of molecular clouds. The apparent overabundance of star-forming molecular clouds over clouds without active star formation has been thought to indicate that molecular clouds are "short-lived" and that star formation is "rapid". We show that this statistical argument lacks self-consistency and, even within the rapid star-formation scenario, implies cloud lifetimes of approximately 10 Myr. We discuss additional observational evidence from external galaxies that indicate lifetimes of molecular clouds and a timescale of star formation of approximately 10 Myr . These long cloud lifetimes in conjunction with the rapid (approximately 1 Myr) decay of supersonic turbulence present severe difficulties for the scenario of turbulence-controlled star formation. By contrast, we show that all 31 existing observations of objects for which the linewidth, the size, and the magnetic field strength have been reliably measured are in excellent quantitative agreement with the predictions of the ambipolar-diffusion theory. Within the ambipolar-diffusion-controlled star formation theory the linewidths may be attributed to large-scale non-radial cloud oscillations (essentially standing large-amplitude, long-wavelength Alfven waves), and the predicted relation between the linewidth, the size, and the magnetic field is a natural consequence of magnetic support of self-gravitating clouds.
  • We formulate the problem of the late accretion phase of the evolution of an isothermal magnetic disk surrounding a forming star. The evolution is described by the six-fluid MHD equations, accounting for the presence of neutrals, atomic and molecular ions, electrons, and neutral, positively, and negatively charged grains. Only the electron fluid is assumed to be attached to the magnetic field, in order to investigate the effect of the detachment of the ions from the magnetic field lines that begins at densities as low as 10^8 cm^-3. The "central sink approximation" is used to circumvent the problem of describing the evolution inside the opaque central region for densities greater than 10^11 cm^-3. In this way, the structure and evolution of the isothermal disk surrounding the forming star can be studied at late times without having to implement the numerically costly radiative transfer required by the physics of the opaque core. The mass and magnetic flux accumulating in the forming star arecalculated, as are their effects on the structure & evolution of the surrounding disk. The numerical method of solution first uses an adaptive grid and later, after a central region a few AU in radius becomes opaque, switches to a stationary but nonuniform grid with a central sink cell. It also involves an implicit time integrator, an advective difference scheme that possesses the transportive property, a second-order difference approximation of forces inside a cell, an integral approximation of the gravitational and magnetic fields, and tensor artificial viscosity that permits an accurate investigation of the formation and evolution of shocks in the neutral fluid.
  • The problem of the late accretion phase of the evolution of an axisymmetric, isothermal magnetic disk surrounding a forming star has been formulated in a companion paper. The "central sink approximation" is used to circumvent the problem of describing the evolution inside the opaque central region for densities greater than 10^11 cm^-3 and radii smaller than a few AUs. Only the electrons are assumed to be attached to the magnetic field lines, and the effects of both negatively and positively charged grains are accounted for. After a mass of 0.1 solar mass accumulates in the central cell (forming star), a series of magnetically driven outflows and associated outward propagating shocks form in a quasi-periodic fashion. As a result, mass accretion onto the protostar occurs in magnetically controlled bursts. We refer to this process as spasmodic accretion. The shocks propagate outward with supermagnetosonic speeds. The period of dissipation and revival of the outflow decreases in time, as the mass accumulated in the central sink increases. We evaluate the contribution of ambipolar diffusion to the resolution of the magnetic flux problem of star formation during the accretion phase, and we find it to be very significant although not sufficient to resolve the entire problem yet. Ohmic dissipation is completely negligible in the disk during this phase of the evolution. The protostellar disk is found to be stable against interchange-like instabilities, despite the fact that the mass-to-flux ratio has temporary local maxima.