• Non-Abelian dark gauge forces that do not couple directly to ordinary matter may be realized in nature. The minimal form of such a dark force is a pure Yang-Mills theory. If the dark sector is reheated in the early universe, it will be realized as a set of dark gluons at high temperatures and as a collection of dark glueballs at lower temperatures, with a cosmological phase transition from one form to the other. Despite being dark, the gauge fields of the new force can connect indirectly to the Standard Model through non-renormalizable operators. These operators will transfer energy between the dark and visible sectors, and they allow some or all of the dark glueballs to decay. In this work we investigate the cosmological evolution and decays of dark glueballs in the presence of connector operators to the Standard Model. Dark glueball decays can modify cosmological and astrophysical observables, and we use these considerations to put very strong limits on the existence of pure non-Abelian dark forces. On the other hand, if one or more of the dark glueballs are stable, we find that they can potentially make up the dark matter of the universe.
  • Our understanding of the Universe is known to be incomplete and new gauge forces beyond those of the Standard Model might be crucial to describing its observed properties. A minimal and well-motivated possibility is a pure Yang-Mills non-Abelian dark gauge force with no direct connection to the Standard Model. We determine here the relic abundances of the glueball bound states that arise in such theories and investigate their cosmological effects. Glueballs are first formed in a confining phase transition, and their relic densities are set by a network of annihilation and transfer reactions. The lightest glueball has no lighter states to annihilate into, and its yield is set mainly by 3 to 2 number-changing processes which persistently release energy into the glueball gas during freeze-out. The abundances of the heavier glueballs are dominated by 2 to 2 transfer reactions, and tend to be much smaller than the lightest state. We also investigate potential connectors between the dark force and the Standard Model that allow some or all of the dark glueballs to decay. If the connection is weak, the lightest glueball can be very long-lived or stable and is a viable dark matter candidate. For stronger connections, the lightest glueball will decay quickly but other heavier glueball states can remain stable and contribute to the dark matter density.
  • We present results from a new incoherent-beam Fast Radio Burst (FRB) search on the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder. Its large instantaneous field of view (FoV) and relative thermal insensitivity allow us to probe the ultra-bright tail of the FRB distribution, and to test a recent claim that this distribution's slope, $\alpha\equiv-\frac{\partial \log N}{\partial \log S}$, is quite small. A 256-input incoherent beamformer was deployed on the CHIME Pathfinder for this purpose. If the FRB distribution were described by a single power-law with $\alpha=0.7$, we would expect an FRB detection every few days, making this the fastest survey on sky at present. We collected 1268 hours of data, amounting to one of the largest exposures of any FRB survey, with over 2.4\,$\times$\,10$^5$\,deg$^2$\,hrs. Having seen no bursts, we have constrained the rate of extremely bright events to $<\!13$\,sky$^{-1}$\,day$^{-1}$ above $\sim$\,220$\sqrt{(\tau/\rm ms)}$ Jy\,ms for $\tau$ between 1.3 and 100\,ms, at 400--800\,MHz. The non-detection also allows us to rule out $\alpha\lesssim0.9$ with 95$\%$ confidence, after marginalizing over uncertainties in the GBT rate at 700--900\,MHz, though we show that for a cosmological population and a large dynamic range in flux density, $\alpha$ is brightness-dependent. Since FRBs now extend to large enough distances that non-Euclidean effects are significant, there is still expected to be a dearth of faint events and relative excess of bright events. Nevertheless we have constrained the allowed number of ultra-intense FRBs. While this does not have significant implications for deeper, large-FoV surveys like full CHIME and APERTIF, it does have important consequences for other wide-field, small dish experiments.
  • Cosmological observations are becoming increasingly sensitive to the effects of light particles in the form of dark radiation (DR) at the time of recombination. The conventional observable of effective neutrino number, $N_{\rm eff}$, is insufficient for probing generic, interacting models of DR. In this work, we perform likelihood analyses which allow both free-streaming effective neutrinos (parametrized by $N_{\rm eff}$) and interacting effective neutrinos (parametrized by $N_{\rm fld}$). We motivate an alternative parametrization of DR in terms of $N_{\rm tot}$ (total effective number of neutrinos) and $f_{\rm fs}$ (the fraction of effective neutrinos which are free-streaming), which is less degenerate than using $N_{\rm eff}$ and $N_{\rm fld}$. Using the Planck 2015 likelihoods in conjunction with measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), we find constraints on the total amount of beyond the Standard Model effective neutrinos (both free-streaming and interacting) of $\Delta N_{\rm tot} < 0.39$ at 2$\sigma$. In addition, we consider the possibility that this scenario alleviates the tensions between early-time and late-time cosmological observations, in particular the measurements of $\sigma_8$ (the amplitude of matter power fluctuations at 8$h^{-1}$ Mpc), finding a mild preference for interactions among light species. We further forecast the sensitivities of a variety of future experiments, including Advanced ACTPol (a representative CMB Stage-III experiment), CMB Stage-IV, and the Euclid satellite. This study is relevant for probing non-standard neutrino physics as well as a wide variety of new particle physics models beyond the Standard Model that involve dark radiation.
  • The recent detection of gravitational waves indicates that stellar-mass black hole binaries are likely to be a key population of sources for forthcoming observations. With future upgrades, ground-based detectors could detect merging black hole binaries out to cosmological distances. Gravitational wave bursts from high redshifts ($z \gtrsim 1$) can be strongly magnified by gravitational lensing due to intervening galaxies along the line of sight. In the absence of electromagnetic counterparts, the mergers' intrinsic mass scale and redshift are degenerate with the unknown magnification factor $\mu$. Hence, strongly magnified low-mass mergers from high redshifts appear as higher-mass mergers from lower redshifts. We assess the impact of this degeneracy on the mass-redshift distribution of observable events for generic models of binary black hole formation from normal stellar evolution, Pop III star remnants, or a primordial black hole population. We find that strong magnification ($\mu \gtrsim 3$) generally creates a heavy tail of apparently massive mergers in the event distribution from a given detector. For LIGO and its future upgrades, this tail may dominate the population of intrinsically massive, but unlensed mergers in binary black hole formation models involving normal stellar evolution or primordial black holes. Modeling the statistics of lensing magnification can help account for this magnification bias when testing astrophysical scenarios of black hole binary formation and evolution.
  • In the standard structure formation scenario based on the cold dark matter paradigm, galactic halos are predicted to contain a large population of dark matter subhalos. While the most massive members of the subhalo population can appear as luminous satellites and be detected in optical surveys, establishing the existence of the low mass and mostly dark subhalos has proven to be a daunting task. Galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses have been successfully used to study mass substructures lying close to lensed images of bright background sources. However, in typical galaxy-scale lenses, the strong lensing region only covers a small projected area of the lens's dark matter halo, implying that the vast majority of subhalos cannot be directly detected in lensing observations. In this paper, we point out that this large population of dark satellites can collectively affect gravitational lensing observables, hence possibly allowing their statistical detection. Focusing on the region of the galactic halo outside the strong lensing area, we compute from first principles the statistical properties of perturbations to the gravitational time delay and position of lensed images in the presence of a mass substructure population. We find that in the standard cosmological scenario, the statistics of these lensing observables are well approximated by Gaussian distributions. The formalism developed as part of this calculation is very general and can be applied to any halo geometry and choice of subhalo mass function. Our results significantly reduce the computational cost of including a large substructure population in lens models and enable the use of Bayesian inference techniques to detect and characterize the distributed satellite population of distant lens galaxies.
  • The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder radio telescope is currently surveying the northern hemisphere between 400 and 800 MHz. By mapping the large scale structure of neutral hydrogen through its redshifted 21 cm line emission between $z \sim 0.8-2.5$ CHIME will contribute to our understanding of Dark Energy. Bright astrophysical foregrounds must be separated from the neutral hydrogen signal, a task which requires precise characterization of the polarized telescope beams. Using the DRAO John A. Galt 26 m telescope, we have developed a holography instrument and technique for mapping the CHIME Pathfinder beams. We report the status of the instrument and initial results of this effort.
  • In a popular class of models, dark matter comprises an asymmetric population of composite particles with short range interactions arising from a confined nonabelian gauge group. We show that coupling this sector to a well-motivated light mediator particle yields efficient darkleosynthesis, a dark-sector version of big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), in generic regions of parameter space. Dark matter self-interaction bounds typically require the confinement scale to be above \Lambda_{QCD}, which generically yields large (>>MeV/dark-nucleon) binding energies. These bounds further suggest the mediator is relatively weakly coupled, so repulsive forces between dark-sector nuclei are much weaker than coulomb repulsion between standard-model nuclei, which results in an exponential barrier-tunneling enhancement over standard BBN. Thus, dark nuclei are easier to make and harder to break than visible species with comparable mass numbers. This process can efficiently yield a dominant population of states with masses significantly greater than the confinement scale and, in contrast to dark matter that is a fundamental particle, may allow the dominant form of dark matter to have high spin > 3/2.
  • We propose that "standard pings", brief broadband radio impulses, can be used to study the three-dimensional clustering of matter in the Universe even in the absence of redshift information. The dispersion of radio waves as they travel through the intervening plasma can, like redshift, be used as a cosmological distance measure. Because of inhomogeneities in the electron density along the line of sight, dispersion is an imperfect proxy for radial distance and we show that this leads to calculable dispersion-space distortions in the apparent clustering of sources. Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are a new class of radio transients that are the prototypical standard ping and, due to their high observed dispersion, have been interpreted as originating at cosmological distances. The rate of fast radio bursts has been estimated to be several thousand over the whole sky per day and, if cosmological, the sources of these events should trace the large-scale structure of the Universe. We calculate the dispersion-space power spectra for a simple model where electrons and FRBs are biased tracers of the large-scale structure of the Universe and we show that the clustering signal could be measured using as few as 10 000 events. Such a survey is in line with what may be achieved with upcoming wide-field radio telescopes.
  • We present the design and implementation of a custom GPU-based compute cluster that provides the correlation X-engine of the CHIME Pathfinder radio telescope. It is among the largest such systems in operation, correlating 32,896 baselines (256 inputs) over 400MHz of radio bandwidth. Making heavy use of consumer-grade parts and a custom software stack, the system was developed at a small fraction of the cost of comparable installations. Unlike existing GPU backends, this system is built around OpenCL kernels running on consumer-level AMD GPUs, taking advantage of low-cost hardware and leveraging packed integer operations to double algorithmic efficiency. The system achieves the required 105TOPS in a 10kW power envelope, making it among the most power-efficient X-engines in use today.
  • In the standard model neutrinos are assumed to have streamed across the Universe since they last scattered at the weak decoupling epoch when the temperature of the standard-model plasma was ~MeV. The shear stress of free-streaming neutrinos imprints itself gravitationally on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and makes the CMB a sensitive probe of neutrino scattering. Yet, the presence of nonstandard physics in the neutrino sector may alter this standard chronology and delay neutrino free-streaming until a much later epoch. We use observations of the CMB to constrain the strength of neutrino self-interactions G_eff and put limits on new physics in the neutrino sector from the early Universe. Recent measurements of the CMB at large multipoles made by the Planck satellite and high-l experiments are critical for probing this physics. Within the context of conventional LambdaCDM parameters cosmological data are compatible with G_eff < 1/(56 MeV)^2 and neutrino free-streaming might be delayed until their temperature has cooled to as low as ~25 eV. Intriguingly, we also find an alternative cosmology compatible with cosmological data in which neutrinos scatter off each other until z~10^4 with a preferred interaction strength in a narrow region around $G_{\rm eff} \simeq 1/({\rm 10 \, MeV})^{2} \simeq 8.6\times10^8 G_{\rm F}$, where $G_{\rm F}$ is the Fermi constant. This distinct self-interacting neutrino cosmology is characterized by somewhat lower values of both the scalar spectral index and the amplitude of primordial fluctuations. While we phrase our discussion here in terms of a specific scenario in which a late onset of neutrino free-streaming could occur, our constraints on the neutrino visibility function are very general.
  • A sufficiently rigid relativistic elastic solid can be stable for negative pressure values and thus is capable of driving a stage of accelerated expansion. If a relativistic elastic solid drove an inflationary stage in the early Universe, quantum mechanically excited perturbations would arise in the medium. We quantize the linear scalar and tensor perturbations and investigate the observational consequences of having such an inflationary period. We find that slowly varying sound speeds of the perturbations and a slowing varying equation of state of the solid can produce a slightly red-tilted scalar power spectrum that agrees with current observational data. Even in the absence of nonadiabatic pressures, perturbations evolve on superhorizon scales, due to the shear stresses within the solid. As such, the spectra of perturbations are in general sensitive to the details of the end of inflation and we characterize this dependence. Interestingly, we uncover here accelerating solutions for elastic solids with (1 + P/\rho) significantly greater than 0 that nevertheless have nearly scale-invariant scalar and tensor spectra. Beyond theoretical interest, this may allow for the possibility of viable inflationary phenomenology relatively far from the de Sitter regime.
  • The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a transit interferometer currently being built at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC, Canada. We will use CHIME to map neutral hydrogen in the frequency range 400 -- 800\,MHz over half of the sky, producing a measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) at redshifts between 0.8 -- 2.5 to probe dark energy. We have deployed a pathfinder version of CHIME that will yield constraints on the BAO power spectrum and provide a test-bed for our calibration scheme. I will discuss the CHIME calibration requirements and describe instrumentation we are developing to meet these requirements.
  • A pathfinder version of CHIME (the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) is currently being commissioned at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC. The instrument is a hybrid cylindrical interferometer designed to measure the large scale neutral hydrogen power spectrum across the redshift range 0.8 to 2.5. The power spectrum will be used to measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale across this poorly probed redshift range where dark energy becomes a significant contributor to the evolution of the Universe. The instrument revives the cylinder design in radio astronomy with a wide field survey as a primary goal. Modern low-noise amplifiers and digital processing remove the necessity for the analog beamforming that characterized previous designs. The Pathfinder consists of two cylinders 37\,m long by 20\,m wide oriented north-south for a total collecting area of 1,500 square meters. The cylinders are stationary with no moving parts, and form a transit instrument with an instantaneous field of view of $\sim$100\,degrees by 1-2\,degrees. Each CHIME Pathfinder cylinder has a feedline with 64 dual polarization feeds placed every $\sim$30\,cm which Nyquist sample the north-south sky over much of the frequency band. The signals from each dual-polarization feed are independently amplified, filtered to 400-800\,MHz, and directly sampled at 800\,MSps using 8 bits. The correlator is an FX design, where the Fourier transform channelization is performed in FPGAs, which are interfaced to a set of GPUs that compute the correlation matrix. The CHIME Pathfinder is a 1/10th scale prototype version of CHIME and is designed to detect the BAO feature and constrain the distance-redshift relation.
  • We demonstrate that self-interacting dark matter models with interactions mediated by light particles can have significant deviations in the matter power-spectrum and detailed structure of galactic halos when compared to a standard cold dark matter scenario. While these deviations can take the form of suppression of small scale structure that are in some ways similar to that of warm dark matter, the self-interacting models have a much wider range of possible phenomenology. A long-range force in the dark matter can introduce multiple scales to the initial power spectrum, in the form of dark acoustic oscillations and an exponential cut-off in the power spectrum. Using simulations we show that the impact of these scales can remain observationally relevant up to the present day. Furthermore, the self-interaction can continue to modify the small-scale structure of the dark matter halos, reducing their central densities and creating a dark matter core. The resulting phenomenology is unique to this type of models.
  • In this paper we continue to develop the m-mode formalism, a technique for efficient and optimal analysis of wide-field transit radio telescopes, targeted at 21 cm cosmology. We extend this formalism to give an accurate treatment of the polarised sky, fully accounting for the effects of polarisation leakage and cross-polarisation. We use the geometry of the measured set of visibilities to project down to pure temperature modes on the sky, serving as a significant compression, and an effective first filter of polarised contaminants. We use the m-mode formalism with the Karhunen-Loeve transform to give a highly efficient method for foreground cleaning, and demonstrate its success in cleaning realistic polarised skies observed with an instrument suffering from substantial off axis polarisation leakage. We develop an optimal quadratic estimator in the m-mode formalism, which can be efficiently calculated using a Monte-Carlo technique. This is used to assess the implications of foreground removal for power spectrum constraints where we find that our method can clean foregrounds well below the foreground wedge, rendering only scales $k_\parallel < 0.02 h \,\mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}$ inaccessible. As this approach assumes perfect knowledge of the telescope, we perform a conservative test of how essential this is by simulating and analysing datasets with deviations about our assumed telescope. Assuming no other techniques to mitigate bias are applied, we recover unbiased power spectra when the per-feed beam width to be measured to 0.1%, and amplifier gains to be known to 1% within each minute. Finally, as an example application, we extend our forecasts to a wideband 400-800 MHz cosmological observation and consider the implications for probing dark energy, finding a medium-sized cylinder telescope improves the DETF Figure of Merit by around 70% over Planck and Stage II experiments alone.
  • We investigate the effects of warm dark matter (WDM) on the cosmic 21-cm signal. If dark matter exists as WDM instead of cold dark matter (CDM), its non-negligible velocities can inhibit the formation of low-mass halos that normally form first in CDM models, therefore delaying star-formation. The absence of early sources delays the build-up of UV and X-ray backgrounds that affect the 21-cm radiation signal produced by neutral hydrogen. With use of the 21CMFAST, code, we demonstrate that the pre-reionization 21-cm signal can be changed significantly in WDM models with a free-streaming length equivalent to that of a thermal relic with mass mx of up to ~10-20 keV. In such a WDM cosmology, the 21-cm signal traces the growth of more massive halos, resulting in a delay of the 21-cm absorption signature and followed by accelerated X-ray heating. CDM models where astrophysical sources have a suppressed photon-production efficiency can delay the 21-cm signal as well, although its subsequent evolution is not as rapid as compared to WDM. This motivates using the gradient of the global 21-cm signal to differentiate between some CDM and WDM models. Finally, we show that the degeneracy between the astrophysics and mx can be broken with the 21-cm power spectrum, as WDM models should have a bias-induced excess of power on large scales. This boost in power should be detectable with current interferometers for models with mx < 3 keV, while next generation instruments will easily be able to measure this difference for all relevant WDM models.
  • If all or a fraction of the dark matter (DM) were coupled to a bath of dark radiation (DR) in the early Universe we expect the combined DM-DR system to give rise to acoustic oscillations of the dark matter until it decouples from the DR. Much like the standard baryon acoustic oscillations, these dark acoustic oscillations (DAO) imprint a characteristic scale, the sound horizon of dark matter, on the matter power spectrum. We compute in detail how the microphysics of the DM-DR interaction affects the clustering of matter in the Universe and show that the DAO physics also gives rise to unique signatures in the temperature and polarization spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We use cosmological data from the CMB, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and large-scale structure to constrain the possible fraction of interacting DM as well as the strength of its interaction with DR. Like nearly all knowledge we have gleaned about dark matter since inferring its existence this constraint rests on the betrayal by gravity of the location of otherwise invisible dark matter. Although our results can be straightforwardly applied to a broad class of models that couple dark matter particles to various light relativistic species, in order to make quantitative predictions, we model the interacting component as dark atoms coupled to a bath of dark photons. We find that linear cosmological data and CMB lensing put strong constraints on existence of DAO features in the CMB and the large-scale structure of the Universe. Interestingly, we find that at most ~5% of all DM can be very strongly interacting with DR. We show that our results are surprisingly constraining for the recently proposed Double-disk DM model, a novel example of how large-scale precision cosmological data can be used to constrain galactic physics and sub-galactic structure.
  • The GMRT Epoch of Reionization (EoR) experiment is an ongoing effort to measure the power spectrum from neutral hydrogen at high redshift. We have previously reported an upper limit of (70 mK)^2 at wavenumbers of k=0.65 h/Mpc using a basic piecewise-linear foreground subtraction. In this paper we explore the use of a singular value decomposition to remove foregrounds with fewer assumptions about the foreground structure. Using this method we also quantify, for the first time, the signal loss due to the foreground filter and present new power spectra adjusted for this loss, providing a revised measurement of a 2-sigma upper limit at (248 mK)^2 for k=0.50 h/Mpc. While this revised limit is larger than previously reported, we believe it to be more robust and still represents the best current constraints on reionization at z=8.6.
  • The cosmological origin of both dark and baryonic matter can be explained through a unified mechanism called hylogenesis where baryon and antibaryon number are divided between the visible sector and a GeV-scale hidden sector, while the Universe remains net baryon symmetric. The "missing" antibaryons, in the form of exotic hidden states, are the dark matter. We study model-building, cosmological, and phenomenological aspects of this scenario within the framework of supersymmetry, which naturally stabilizes the light hidden sector and electroweak mass scales. Inelastic dark matter scattering on visible matter destroys nucleons, and nucleon decay searches offer a novel avenue for the direct detection of the hidden antibaryonic dark matter sea.
  • While, to ensure successful cosmology, dark matter (DM) must kinematically decouple from the standard model plasma very early in the history of the Universe, it can remain coupled to a bath of "dark radiation" until a relatively late epoch. One minimal theory that realizes such a scenario is the Atomic Dark Matter model, in which two fermions oppositely charged under a new U(1) dark force are initially coupled to a thermal bath of "dark photons" but eventually recombine into neutral atom-like bound states and begin forming gravitationally-bound structures. As dark atoms have (dark) atom-sized geometric cross sections, this model also provides an example of self-interacting DM with a velocity-dependent cross section. Delayed kinetic decoupling in this scenario predicts novel DM properties on small scales but retains the success of cold DM on larger scales. We calculate the atomic physics necessary to capture the thermal history of this dark sector and show significant improvements over the standard atomic hydrogen calculation are needed. We solve the Boltzmann equations that govern the evolution of cosmological fluctuations in this model and find in detail the impact of the atomic DM scenario on the matter power spectrum and the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This scenario imprints a new length scale, the Dark-Acoustic-Oscillation (DAO) scale, on the matter density field. This DAO scale shapes the small-scale matter power spectrum and determines the minimal DM halo mass at late times which may be many orders of magnitude larger than in a typical WIMP scenario. This model necessarily includes an extra dark radiation component, which may be favoured by current CMB experiments, and we quantify CMB signatures that distinguish an atomic DM scenario from a standard $\Lambda$CDM model containing extra free-streaming particles. [Abridged]
  • We explore the model-independent constraints from cosmology on a dark-matter particle with no prominent standard model interactions that interacts and thermalizes with other particles in a hidden sector. Without specifying detailed hidden-sector particle physics, we characterize the relevant physics by the annihilation cross section, mass, and temperature ratio of the hidden to visible sectors. While encompassing the standard cold WIMP scenario, we do not require the freeze-out process to be nonrelativistic. Rather, freeze-out may also occur when dark matter particles are semirelativistic or relativistic. We solve the Boltzmann equation to find the conditions that hidden-sector dark matter accounts for the observed dark-matter density, satisfies the Tremaine-Gunn bound on dark-matter phase space density, and has a free-streaming length consistent with cosmological constraints on the matter power spectrum. We show that for masses <1.5 keV no region of parameter space satisfies all these constraints. This is a gravitationally-mediated lower bound on the dark-matter mass for any model in which the primary component of dark matter once had efficient interactions -- even if it has never been in equilibrium with the standard model.
  • The thermal and expansion history of the Universe before big bang nucleosynthesis is unknown. We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations through the transition from an early matter era to radiation domination. We treat reheating as the perturbative decay of an oscillating scalar field into relativistic plasma and cold dark matter. After reheating, we find that subhorizon perturbations in the decay-produced dark matter density are significantly enhanced, while subhorizon radiation perturbations are instead suppressed. If dark matter originates in the radiation bath after reheating, this suppression may be the primary cutoff in the matter power spectrum. Conversely, for dark matter produced nonthermally from scalar decay, enhanced perturbations can drive structure formation during the cosmic dark ages and dramatically increase the abundance of compact substructures. For low reheat temperatures, we find that as much as 50% of all dark matter is in microhalos with M > 0.1 Earth masses at z=100, compared to a fraction of 1e-10 in the standard case. In this scenario, ultradense substructures may constitute a large fraction of dark matter in galaxies today.
  • We investigate new and unusual signals that arise in theories where dark matter is asymmetric and carries a net antibaryon number, as may occur when the dark matter abundance is linked to the baryon abundance. Antibaryonic dark matter can cause {\it induced nucleon decay} by annihilating visible baryons through inelastic scattering. These processes lead to an effective nucleon lifetime of 10^{29}-10^{32} years in terrestrial nucleon decay experiments, if baryon number transfer between visible and dark sectors arises through new physics at the weak scale. The possibility of induced nucleon decay motivates a novel approach for direct detection of cosmic dark matter in nucleon decay experiments. Monojet searches (and related signatures) at hadron colliders also provide a complementary probe of weak-scale dark-matter--induced baryon number violation. Finally, we discuss the effects of baryon-destroying dark matter on stellar systems and show that it can be consistent with existing observations.
  • Prior to recombination photons, electrons, and atomic nuclei rapidly scattered and behaved, almost, like a single tightly-coupled photon-baryon plasma. We investigate here the accuracy of the tight-coupling approximation commonly used to numerically evolve the baryon and photon perturbation equations at early times. By solving the exact perturbations equations with a stiff solver starting deep in the radiation-dominated epoch we find the level of inaccuracy introduced by resorting to the standard first-order tight-coupling approximation. We develop a new second-order approximation in the inverse Thomson opacity expansion and show that it closely tracks the full solution, at essentially no extra numerical cost. We find the bias on estimates of cosmological parameters introduced by the first-order approximation is, for most parameters, negligible. Finally, we show that our second-order approximation can be used to reduce the time needed to compute cosmic microwave background angular spectra by as much as ~17%.