• Low rank matrix approximation is an important tool in machine learning. Given a data matrix, low rank approximation helps to find factors, patterns and provides concise representations for the data. Research on low rank approximation usually focus on real matrices. However, in many applications data are binary (categorical) rather than continuous. This leads to the problem of low rank approximation of binary matrix. Here we are given a $d \times n$ binary matrix $A$ and a small integer $k$. The goal is to find two binary matrices $U$ and $V$ of sizes $d \times k$ and $k \times n$ respectively, so that the Frobenius norm of $A - U V$ is minimized. There are two models of this problem, depending on the definition of the dot product of binary vectors: The $\mathrm{GF}(2)$ model and the Boolean semiring model. Unlike low rank approximation of real matrix which can be efficiently solved by Singular Value Decomposition, approximation of binary matrix is $NP$-hard even for $k=1$. In this paper, we consider the problem of Column Subset Selection (CSS), in which one low rank matrix must be formed by $k$ columns of the data matrix. We characterize the approximation ratio of CSS for binary matrices. For $GF(2)$ model, we show the approximation ratio of CSS is bounded by $\frac{k}{2}+1+\frac{k}{2(2^k-1)}$ and this bound is asymptotically tight. For Boolean model, it turns out that CSS is no longer sufficient to obtain a bound. We then develop a Generalized CSS (GCSS) procedure in which the columns of one low rank matrix are generated from Boolean formulas operating bitwise on columns of the data matrix. We show the approximation ratio of GCSS is bounded by $2^{k-1}+1$, and the exponential dependency on $k$ is inherent.
  • We study the truthful facility assignment problem, where a set of agents with private most-preferred points on a metric space are assigned to facilities that lie on the metric space, under capacity constraints on the facilities. The goal is to produce such an assignment that minimizes the social cost, i.e., the total distance between the most-preferred points of the agents and their corresponding facilities in the assignment, under the constraint of truthfulness, which ensures that agents do not misreport their most-preferred points. We propose a resource augmentation framework, where a truthful mechanism is evaluated by its worst-case performance on an instance with enhanced facility capacities against the optimal mechanism on the same instance with the original capacities. We study a very well-known mechanism, Serial Dictatorship, and provide an exact analysis of its performance. Although Serial Dictatorship is a purely combinatorial mechanism, our analysis uses linear programming; a linear program expresses its greedy nature as well as the structure of the input, and finds the input instance that enforces the mechanism have its worst-case performance. Bounding the objective of the linear program using duality arguments allows us to compute tight bounds on the approximation ratio. Among other results, we prove that Serial Dictatorship has approximation ratio $g/(g-2)$ when the capacities are multiplied by any integer $g \geq 3$. Our results suggest that even a limited augmentation of the resources can have wondrous effects on the performance of the mechanism and in particular, the approximation ratio goes to 1 as the augmentation factor becomes large. We complement our results with bounds on the approximation ratio of Random Serial Dictatorship, the randomized version of Serial Dictatorship, when there is no resource augmentation.
  • The Stackelberg equilibrium solution concept describes optimal strategies to commit to: Player 1 (termed the leader) publicly commits to a strategy and Player 2 (termed the follower) plays a best response to this strategy (ties are broken in favor of the leader). We study Stackelberg equilibria in finite sequential games (or extensive-form games) and provide new exact algorithms, approximate algorithms, and hardness results for several classes of these sequential games.
  • In this paper we study how to play (stochastic) games optimally using little space. We focus on repeated games with absorbing states, a type of two-player, zero-sum concurrent mean-payoff games. The prototypical example of these games is the well known Big Match of Gillete (1957). These games may not allow optimal strategies but they always have {\epsilon}-optimal strategies. In this paper we design {\epsilon}-optimal strategies for Player 1 in these games that use only O(log log T ) space. Furthermore, we construct strategies for Player 1 that use space s(T), for an arbitrary small unbounded non-decreasing function s, and which guarantee an {\epsilon}-optimal value for Player 1 in the limit superior sense. The previously known strategies use space {\Omega}(logT) and it was known that no strategy can use constant space if it is {\epsilon}-optimal even in the limit superior sense. We also give a complementary lower bound. Furthermore, we also show that no Markov strategy, even extended with finite memory, can ensure value greater than 0 in the Big Match, answering a question posed by Abraham Neyman.
  • We consider finite-state concurrent stochastic games, played by k>=2 players for an infinite number of rounds, where in every round, each player simultaneously and independently of the other players chooses an action, whereafter the successor state is determined by a probability distribution given by the current state and the chosen actions. We consider reachability objectives that given a target set of states require that some state in the target is visited, and the dual safety objectives that given a target set require that only states in the target set are visited. We are interested in the complexity of stationary strategies measured by their patience, which is defined as the inverse of the smallest nonzero probability employed. Our main results are as follows: We show that in two-player zero-sum concurrent stochastic games (with reachability objective for one player and the complementary safety objective for the other player): (i) the optimal bound on the patience of optimal and epsilon-optimal strategies, for both players is doubly exponential; and (ii) even in games with a single nonabsorbing state exponential (in the number of actions) patience is necessary. In general we study the class of non-zero-sum games admitting stationary epsilon-Nash equilibria. We show that if there is at least one player with reachability objective, then doubly-exponential patience may be needed for epsilon-Nash equilibrium strategies, whereas in contrast if all players have safety objectives, the optimal bound on patience for epsilon-Nash equilibrium strategies is only exponential.
  • We consider the task of computing an approximation of a trembling hand perfect equilibrium for an n-player game in strategic form, n >= 3. We show that this task is complete for the complexity class FIXP_a. In particular, the task is polynomial time equivalent to the task of computing an approximation of a Nash equilibrium in strategic form games with three (or more) players.
  • For matrix games we study how small nonzero probability must be used in optimal strategies. We show that for nxn win-lose-draw games (i.e. (-1,0,1) matrix games) nonzero probabilities smaller than n^{-O(n)} are never needed. We also construct an explicit nxn win-lose game such that the unique optimal strategy uses a nonzero probability as small as n^{-Omega(n)}. This is done by constructing an explicit (-1,1) nonsingular nxn matrix, for which the inverse has only nonnegative entries and where some of the entries are of value n^{Omega(n)}.
  • Two standard algorithms for approximately solving two-player zero-sum concurrent reachability games are value iteration and strategy iteration. We prove upper and lower bounds of 2^(m^(Theta(N))) on the worst case number of iterations needed by both of these algorithms for providing non-trivial approximations to the value of a game with N non-terminal positions and m actions for each player in each position. In particular, both algorithms have doubly-exponential complexity. Even when the game given as input has only one non-terminal position, we prove an exponential lower bound on the worst case number of iterations needed to provide non-trivial approximations.
  • Shapley's discounted stochastic games, Everett's recursive games and Gillette's undiscounted stochastic games are classical models of game theory describing two-player zero-sum games of potentially infinite duration. We describe algorithms for exactly solving these games.
  • We consider approximating the minmax value of a multi-player game in strategic form. Tightening recent bounds by Borgs et al., we observe that approximating the value with a precision of epsilon log n digits (for any constant epsilon>0 is NP-hard, where n is the size of the game. On the other hand, approximating the value with a precision of c log log n digits (for any constant c >= 1) can be done in quasi-polynomial time. We consider the parameterized complexity of the problem, with the parameter being the number of pure strategies k of the player for which the minmax value is computed. We show that if there are three players, k=2 and there are only two possible rational payoffs, the minmax value is a rational number and can be computed exactly in linear time. In the general case, we show that the value can be approximated with any polynomial number of digits of accuracy in time n^(O(k)). On the other hand, we show that minmax value approximation is W[1]-hard and hence not likely to be fixed parameter tractable. Concretely, we show that if k-CLIQUE requires time n^(Omega(k)) then so does minmax value computation.
  • We define the class of "simple recursive games". A simple recursive game is defined as a simple stochastic game (a notion due to Anne Condon), except that we allow arbitrary real payoffs but disallow moves of chance. We study the complexity of solving simple recursive games and obtain an almost-linear time comparison-based algorithm for computing an equilibrium of such a game. The existence of a linear time comparison-based algorithm remains an open problem.