• Binary black holes (BBHs) are one of the endpoints of isolated binary evolution, and their mergers a leading channel for gravitational wave events. Here, using the evolutionary code \textsc{StarTrack}, we study the statistical properties of the BBH population from isolated binary evolution for a range of progenitor star metallicities and BH natal kicks. We compute the mass function and the distribution of the primary BH spin $a$ as a result of mass accretion during the binary evolution, and find that this is not an efficient process to spin up BHs, producing an increase by at most $a\sim$~0.2--0.3 for very low natal BH spins. We further compute the distribution of merger sites within the host galaxy, after tracking the motion of the binaries in the potentials of a massive spiral, a massive elliptical, and a dwarf galaxy. We find that a fraction of 70-90\% of mergers in massive galaxies and of 40-60\% in dwarfs (range mostly sensitive to the natal kicks) is expected to occur inside of their hosts. The number density distribution at the merger sites further allows us to estimate the broadband luminosity distribution that BBH mergers would produce, \textit{if} associated with a kinetic energy release in an outflow, {which, as a reference, we assume at the level inferred for the \textit{Fermi} GBM counterpart to GW150914, with the understanding that current limits from the O1 and O2 runs would require such emission to be produced within a jet of angular size within $\lesssim 50^\circ$.}
  • We investigate the impact of combining Gaia astrometry from space with precise, high cadence OGLE photometry from the ground. For the archival event OGLE3-ULENS-PAR-02, which is likely a black hole, we simulate a realistic astrometric time-series of Gaia measurements and combine it with the real photometric data collected by the OGLE project. We predict that at the end of the nominal 5 years of the Gaia mission, for the events brighter than $G\approx15.5$ mag at the baseline, caused by objects heavier than 10 $M_{\odot}$, it will be possible to unambiguously derive masses of the lenses, with accuracy between a few to 15 per cent. We find that fainter events ($G<17.5$) can still have their lens masses determined, provided that they are heavier than 30 $M_{\odot}$. We estimate that the rate of astrometric microlensing events caused by the stellar-origin black holes is $\approx 4 \times 10^{-7} \, \rm yr^{-1}$, which implies, that after 5 years of Gaia operation and $\approx 5 \times 10^6$ bright sources in Gaia, it will be possible to identify few such events in the Gaia final catalogues.
  • Rapidly accreting white dwarfs (RAWDs) have been proposed as contributors to the chemical evolution of heavy elements in the Galaxy. Here, we test this scenario for the first time and determine the contribution of RAWDs to the solar composition of first-peak neutron-capture elements. We add the metallicity-dependent contribution of RAWDs to the one-zone galactic chemical evolution code OMEGA according to RAWD rates from binary stellar population models combined with metallicity-dependent $i$-process stellar yields calculated following the models of Denissenkov et al. (2017). With this approach we find that the contribution of RAWDs to the evolution of heavy elements in the Galaxy could be responsible for a significant fraction of the solar composition of Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, and Mo ranging from $2$ to $45\%$ depending on the element, the enrichment history of the Galactic gas, and the total mass ejected per RAWD. This contribution could explain the missing solar Lighter Element Primary Process for some elements (e.g., Sr, Y, and Zr). We do not overproduce any isotope relative to the solar composition, but $^{96}$Zr is produced in a similar amount. The $i$ process produces efficiently the Mo stable isotopes $^{95}$Mo and $^{97}$Mo. When nuclear reaction rate uncertainties are combined with our GCE uncertainties, the upper limits for the predicted RAWD contribution increase by a factor of $1.5-2$ for Rb, Sr, Y, and Zr, and by 3.8 and 2.4 for Nb and Mo, respectively. We discuss the implication of the RAWD stellar evolution properties on the single degenerate Type Ia supernova scenario.
  • Some of the heavy elements, such as gold and europium (Eu), are almost exclusively formed by the rapid neutron capture process (r-process). However, it is still unclear which astrophysical site between core-collapse supernovae and neutron star - neutron star (NS-NS) mergers produced most of the r-process elements in the universe. Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models can test these scenarios by quantifying the frequency and yields required to reproduce the amount of europium (Eu) observed in galaxies. Although NS-NS mergers have become popular candidates, their required frequency (or rate) needs to be consistent with that obtained from gravitational wave measurements. Here we address the first NS-NS merger detected by LIGO/Virgo (GW170817) and its associated Gamma-ray burst and analyze their implication on the origin of r-process elements. The range of NS-NS merger rate densities of 320-4740 Gpc$^{-3}$ yr$^{-1}$ provided by LIGO/Virgo is remarkably consistent with the range required by GCE to explain the Eu abundances in the Milky Way with NS-NS mergers, assuming the solar r-process abundance pattern for the ejecta. Under the same assumption, this event has produced about 1-5 Earth masses of Eu, and 3-13 Earth masses of gold. When using theoretical calculations to derive Eu yields, constraining the role of NS-NS mergers becomes more challenging because of nuclear astrophysics uncertainties. This is the first study that directly combines nuclear physics uncertainties with GCE calculations. If GW170817 is a representative event, NS-NS mergers can produce Eu in sufficient amounts and are likely to be the main r-process site.
  • We revisit double neutron star (DNS) formation in the classical binary evolution scenario in light of the recent LIGO/Virgo DNS detection (GW170817). The observationally estimated Galactic DNS merger rate of $R_{\rm MW}=21^{+28}_{-14}$ Myr$^{-1}$, based on 3 Galactic DNS systems, fully supports our standard input physics model with $R_{\rm MW} =24$ Myr$^{-1}$. This estimate for the Galaxy translates in a non-trivial way (due to cosmological evolution of progenitor stars in chemically evolving Universe) into a local ($z\approx0$) DNS merger rate density of $R_{\rm local}=48$ Gpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$, which {\em is not} consistent with the current LIGO/Virgo DNS merger rate estimate ($1540^{+3200}_{-1220}$ Gpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$). Within our study of the parameter space we find solutions that allow for DNS merger rates as high as $R_{\rm local} \approx 600^{+600}_{-300}$ Gpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$ which are thus consistent with the LIGO/Virgo estimate. However, our corresponding BH-BH merger rates for the models with high DNS merger rates exceed the current LIGO/Virgo estimate of local BH-BH merger rate ($12$-$213$ Gpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$). Apart from being particularly sensitive to the common envelope treatment, DNS merger rates are rather robust against variations of several of the key factors probed in our study (e.g. mass transfer, angular momentum loss, natal kicks). This might suggest that either common envelope development/survival works differently for DNS ($\sim$ 10-20 Msun stars) than for BH-BH ($\sim$ 40-100 Msun stars) progenitors, or high BH natal kicks are needed to meet observational constraints for both types of binaries. Note that our conclusion is based on a limited number of (21) evolutionary models and is valid only within this particular DNS and BH-BH isolated binary formation scenario.
  • Recently, several ultraluminous X-ray (ULX) sources were shown to host a neutron star (NS) accretor. We perform a suite of evolutionary calculations which show that, in fact, NSs are the dominant type of ULX accretor. Although black holes (BH) dominate early epochs after the star-formation burst, NSs outweigh them after a few 100 Myr and may appear as late as a few Gyr after the end of the star formation episode. If star formation is a prolonged and continuous event (i.e., not a relatively short burst), NS accretors dominate ULX population at any time in solar metallicity environment, whereas BH accretors dominate when the metallicity is sub-solar. Our results show a very clear (and testable) relation between the companion/donor evolutionary stage and the age of the system. A typical NS ULX consists of a $\sim1.3\,M_\odot$ NS and $\sim1.0\,M_\odot$ Red Giant. A typical BH ULX consist of a $\sim8\,M_\odot$ BH and $\sim6\,M_\odot$ main-sequence star. Additionally, we find that the very luminous ULXs ($L_X\gtrsim10^{41}$ erg/s) are predominantly BH systems ($\sim9\,M_\odot$) with Hertzsprung gap donors ($\sim2\,M_\odot$). Nevertheless, some NS ULX systems may also reach extremely high X-ray luminosities ($\gtrsim10^{41}$ erg/s).
  • Very wide binaries (> 500 AU) are subject to numerous encounters with flying-by stars in the Galactic field and can be perturbated into highly eccentric orbits (e ~ 0.99). For such systems tidal interactions at close pericenter passages can lead to orbit circularization and possibly mass transfer, consequently producing X-Ray binaries without the need for common envelope. We test this scenario for the case of Black Hole Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries (BH LMXBs) by performing a population synthesis from primordial binaries with numerical treatment of random stellar encounters. We test various models for the threshold pericenter distance under which tidal forces cause circularization. We estimate that fly-by interactions can produce a current population of ~ 60$-$220 BH LMXBs in the Galactic field. The results are sensitive to the assumption on tidal circularization efficiency and zero to very small BH natal kicks of a few km/s are required. We show that the most likely donors are low-mass stars (< 1 Msun; at the onset of mass transfer) as observed in the population of known sources (~ 20). However, the low number of systems formed along this route is in tension with most recent observational estimate of the number of dormant BH LMXBs in the Galaxy 10$^4-$10$^8$ (Tetarenko et al. 2016). If indeed the numbers are so high, alternative formation channels of BHs with low-mass donors need to be identified.
  • The role of compact binary mergers as the main production site of r-process elements is investigated by combining stellar abundances of Eu observed in the Milky Way, galactic chemical evolution (GCE) simulations, binary population synthesis models, and Advanced LIGO gravitational wave measurements. We compiled and reviewed seven recent GCE studies to extract the frequency of neutron star - neutron star (NS-NS) mergers that is needed in order to reproduce the observed [Eu/Fe] vs [Fe/H] relationship. We used our simple chemical evolution code to explore the impact of different analytical delay-time distribution (DTD) functions for NS-NS mergers. We then combined our metallicity-dependent population synthesis models with our chemical evolution code to bring their predictions, for both NS-NS mergers and black hole - neutron star mergers, into a GCE context. Finally, we convolved our results with the cosmic star formation history to provide a direct comparison with current and upcoming Advanced LIGO measurements. When assuming that NS-NS mergers are the exclusive r-process sites, and that the ejected r-process mass per merger event is 0.01 Msun, the number of NS-NS mergers needed in GCE studies is about 10 times larger than what is predicted by standard population synthesis models. These two distinct fields can only be consistent with each other when assuming optimistic rates, massive NS-NS merger ejecta, and low Fe yields for massive stars. Population synthesis models and GCE simulations are in agreement with the current upper limit (O1) established by Advanced LIGO during their first run of observations. Upcoming measurements will provide important constraints on the actual local NS-NS merger rate, will provide insights on the plausibility of the GCE requirement, and will help to define whether or not compact binary mergers can be the dominant source of r-process elements in the Universe.
  • We employ population synthesis method to model the double neutron star (DNS) population and test various possibilities on natal kick velocities gained by neutron stars after their formation. We first choose natal kicks after standard core collapse SN from a Maxwellian distribution with velocity dispersion of sigma=265 km/s as proposed by Hobbs et al. (2005) and then modify this distribution by changing the velocity dispersion towards smaller and larger kick values. We also take into account the possibility of NS formation through electron capture supernova. In this case we test two scenarios: zero natal kick or small natal kick, drawn from Maxwellian distribution with sigma = 26.5 km/s. We calculate the present-day orbital parameters of binaries and compare the resulting eccentricities with those known for observed DNSs. As an additional test we calculate Galactic merger rates for our model populations and confront them with observational limits. We do not find any model unequivocally consistent with both observational constraints simultaneously.The models with low kicks after CCSN for binaries with the second NS forming through core collapse SN are marginally consistent with the observations. This means that either 14 observed DNSs are not representative of the intrinsic Galactic population, or that our modeling of DNS formation needs revision.
  • We estimate the potential of present and future interferometric gravitational-wave detectors to test the Kerr nature of black holes through "gravitational spectroscopy," i.e. the measurement of multiple quasinormal mode frequencies from the remnant of a black hole merger. Using population synthesis models of the formation and evolution of stellar-mass black hole binaries, we find that Voyager-class interferometers will be necessary to perform these tests. Gravitational spectroscopy in the local Universe may become routine with the Einstein Telescope, but a 40-km facility like Cosmic Explorer is necessary to go beyond $z\sim 3$. In contrast, eLISA-like detectors should carry out a few - or even hundreds - of these tests every year, depending on uncertainties in massive black hole formation models. Many space-based spectroscopical measurements will occur at high redshift, testing the strong gravity dynamics of Kerr black holes in domains where cosmological corrections to general relativity (if they occur in nature) must be significant.
  • The merger of two massive 30 Msun black holes has been detected in gravitational waves (1,GW150914). This discovery validates recent predictions (2-4) that massive binary black holes would constitute the first detection. However, previous calculations have not sampled the relevant binary black hole progenitors---massive, low-metallicity binary stars---with sufficient accuracy and input physics to enable robust predictions to better than several orders of magnitude (5-10). Here we report a suite of high-precision numerical simulations of binary black hole formation via the evolution of isolated binary stars, providing a framework to interpret GW150914 and predict the properties of subsequent binary black hole gravitational-wave events. Our models imply that these events form in an environment where the metallicity is less than 10 percent of solar; have initial masses of 40-100 Msun; and interact through mass transfer and a common envelope phase. Their progenitors likely form either at 2 Gyr, or somewhat less likely, at 11 Gyr after the Big Bang. Most binary black holes form without supernova explosions, and their spins are nearly unchanged since birth, but do not have to be parallel. The classical field formation of binary black holes proposed in this study, with low natal kicks and restricted common envelope evolution, produces 40 times more binary black holes than dynamical formation channels involving globular clusters (11) and is comparable to the rate from homogeneous evolution channels (12-15). Our calculations predict detections of about 1,000 black hole mergers per year with total mass of 20-80 Msun once second generation ground-based gravitational wave observatories reach full sensitivity.
  • We compare evolutionary predictions of double compact object merger rate densities with initial and forthcoming LIGO/Virgo upper limits. We find that: (i) Due to the cosmological reach of advanced detectors, current conversion methods of population synthesis predictions into merger rate densities are insufficient. (ii) Our optimistic models are a factor of 18 below the initial LIGO/Virgo upper limits for BH-BH systems, indicating that a modest increase in observational sensitivity (by a factor of 2.5) may bring the first detections or first gravitational wave constraints on binary evolution. (iii) Stellar-origin massive BH-BH mergers should dominate event rates in advanced LIGO/Virgo and can be detected out to redshift z=2 with templates including inspiral, merger, and ringdown. Normal stars (<150 Msun) can produce such mergers with total redshifted mass up to 400 Msun. (iv) High black hole natal kicks can severely limit the formation of massive BH-BH systems (both in isolated binary and in dynamical dense cluster evolution), and thus would eliminate detection of these systems even at full advanced LIGO/Virgo sensitivity. We find that low and high black hole natal kicks are allowed by current observational electromagnetic constraints. (v) The majority of our models yield detections of all types of mergers (NS-NS, BH-NS, BH-BH) with advanced detectors. Numerous massive BH-BH merger detections will indicate small (if any) natal kicks for massive BHs.
  • In this proof-of-concept study we demonstrate that in a binary system mass can be transferred toward an accreting compact object at extremely high rate. If the transferred mass is efficiently converted to X-ray luminosity (with disregard of the classical Eddington limit) or if the X-rays are focused into a narrow beam then binaries can form extreme ULX sources with the X-ray luminosity of Lx>10^42 erg/s. For example, Lasota & King argued that the brightest known ULX (HLX-1) is a regular binary system with a rather low-mass compact object (a stellar-origin black hole or a neutron star). The predicted formation efficiencies and lifetimes of binaries with the very high mass transfer rates are large enough to explain all observed systems with extreme X-ray luminosities. These systems are not only limited to binaries with stellar-origin black hole accretors. Noteworthy, we have also identified such objects with neutron stars. Typically, a 10 Msun black hole is fed by a massive (10 Msun) Hertzsprung gap donor with Roche lobe overflow rate of 10^-3 Msun/yr (2600 MEdd). For neutron star systems the typical donors are evolved low-mass (2 Msun) helium stars with Roche lobe overflow rate of 10^-2 Msun/yr. Our study does not prove that any particular extreme ULX is a regular binary system, but it demonstrates that any ULX, including the most luminous ones, may potentially be a short-lived phase in the life of a binary star.
  • We analyze the distinguishability of populations of coalescing binary neutron stars, neutron-star black-hole binaries, and binary black holes, whose gravitational-wave signatures are expected to be observed by the advanced network of ground-based interferometers LIGO and Virgo. We consider population-synthesis predictions for plausible merging binary distributions in mass space, along with measurement accuracy estimates from the main gravitational-wave parameter-estimation pipeline. We find that for our model compact-object binary mass distribution, we can always distinguish binary neutron stars and black-hole--neutron-star binaries, but not necessarily black-hole--neutron-star binaries and binary black holes; however, with a few tens of detections, we can accurately identify the three subpopulations and measure their respective rates.
  • Stellar mass black hole binaries have individual masses between 10-80 solar masses. These systems may emit gravitational waves at frequencies detectable at Megaparsec distances by space-based gravitational wave observatories. In a previous study, we determined the selection effects of observing these systems with detectors similar to the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna by using a generated population of binary black holes that covered a reasonable parameter space and calculating their signal-to-noise ratio. We further our study by populating the galaxies in our nearby (less than 30 Mpc) universe with binary black hole systems drawn from a distribution found in the Synthetic Universe to ultimately investigate the likely event rate of detectable binaries from galaxies in the nearby universe.
  • If binaries consisting of two 100 Msun black holes exist they would serve as extraordinarily powerful gravitational-wave sources, detectable to redshifts of z=2 with the advanced LIGO/Virgo ground-based detectors. Large uncertainties about the evolution of massive stars preclude definitive rate predictions for mergers of these massive black holes. We show that rates as high as hundreds of detections per year, or as low as no detections whatsoever, are both possible. It was thought that the only way to produce these massive binaries was via dynamical interactions in dense stellar systems. This view has been challenged by the recent discovery of several stars with mass above 150 Msun in the R136 region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Current models predict that when stars of this mass leave the main sequence, their expansion is insufficient to allow common envelope evolution to efficiently reduce the orbital separation. The resulting black-hole--black-hole binary remains too wide to be able to coalesce within a Hubble time. If this assessment is correct, isolated very massive binaries do not evolve to be gravitational-wave sources. However, other formation channels exist. For example, the high multiplicity of massive stars, and their common formation in relatively dense stellar associations, opens up dynamical channels for massive black hole mergers (e.g., via Kozai cycles or repeated binary-single interactions). We identify key physical factors that shape the population of very massive black-hole--black-hole binaries. Advanced gravitational-wave detectors will provide important constraints on the formation and evolution of very massive stars.
  • There are 19 confirmed BH binaries in the Galaxy. 16 of them are X-ray transients hosting a ~5-15 Msun BH and a Roche-lobe overflowing low-mass companion. Companion masses are found mostly in 0.1-1 Msun mass range with peak at 0.6 Msun. The formation of these systems is believed to involve a common envelope phase, initiated by a BH progenitor, expected to be a massive star >20 Msun. It was realized that it may be very problematic for a low-mass companion to eject a massive envelope of the black hole progenitor. It invoked suggestions that an intermediate-mass companion ejects the envelope, and then is shredded by the Roche-lobe overflow to its current low-mass. But this creates another issue; a temperature mismatch between hot models and the observed cool low-mass donors. Finally, the main driver of Roche-lobe overflow that is believed to be magnetic braking does not seem to follow any theoretically calculated models. Number of ideas were put forward to explain various parts of this conundrum; pre-main sequence donor nature, alternative approach to magnetic braking and common envelope energy was revisited. We test various proposals and models to show that no overall solution exists so far. We argue that common envelope physics is not crucial in the understanding BH transient physical properties, but may affect significantly their formation rates. Our failure most likely indicates that either the current evolutionary models for low-mass stars and magnetic braking are not realistic or that the intrinsic population of BH transients is quite different from the observed one.
  • The double-detonation explosion scenario of Type Ia supernovae has gained increased support from the SN Ia community as a viable progenitor model, making it a promising candidate alongside the well-known single degenerate and double degenerate scenarios. We present delay times of double-detonation SNe, in which a sub-Chandrasekhar mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf accretes non-dynamically from a helium-rich companion. One of the main uncertainties in quantifying SN rates from double-detonations is the (assumed) retention efficiency of He-rich matter. Therefore, we implement a new prescription for the treatment of accretion/accumulation of He-rich matter on white dwarfs. In addition, we test how the results change depending on which criteria are assumed to lead to a detonation in the helium shell. In comparing the results to our standard case (Ruiter et al. 2011), we find that regardless of the adopted He accretion prescription, the SN rates are reduced by only 25% if low-mass He shells (< 0.05 Msun) are sufficient to trigger the detonations. If more massive (0.1 Msun) shells are needed, the rates decrease by 85% and the delay time distribution is significantly changed in the new accretion model - only SNe with prompt (< 500 Myr) delay times are produced. Since theoretical arguments favour low-mass He shells for normal double-detonation SNe, we conclude that the rates from double-detonations are likely to be high, and should not critically depend on the adopted prescription for accretion of He.
  • We compare the current LIGO/Virgo upper limits on double compact object volumetric merger rates with our theoretical predictions. Our optimistic models are a factor of 3 below the existing upper limits for massive BH-BH systems with total mass 50-70 Msun, suggesting that a small increase in observational sensitivity may bring the first detections. The LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave observatories are currently being upgraded to advanced design sensitivity. If a sizeable population of BH-BH binaries is detected, the maximum total binary mass of this population will discriminate between two general families of common envelope models. If no binaries are detected, the new upper limits will provide astrophysically useful information about the environment and physical processes (e.g., metallicity of host galaxies or BH natal kicks) crucial to the formation of binaries containing black holes. For NS-NS systems, our predicted rates are 3 orders of magnitude below the current upper limits; even if advanced instruments reach their design sensitivities (factors of 10 times in distance, and 1,000 times in volumetric rate) the detection of NS-NS systems is not assured. However, we note that although our predicted NS-NS merger rates are consistent with estimates derived from Galactic NS-NS binaries and short GRBs, they are on the low side of these empirical estimates.
  • The development of advanced gravitational wave (GW) observatories, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, provides impetus to refine theoretical predictions for what these instruments might detect. In particular, with the range increasing by an order of magnitude, the search for GW sources is extending beyond the "local" Universe and out to cosmological distances. Double compact objects (neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS), black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) and black hole-black hole (BH-BH) systems) are considered to be the most promising gravitational wave sources. In addition, NS-NS and/or BH-NS systems are thought to be the progenitors of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), and may also be associated with kilonovae. In this paper we present the merger event rates of these objects as a function of cosmological redshift. We provide the results for four cases, each one investigating a different important evolution parameter of binary stars. Each case is also presented for two metallicity evolution scenarios. We find that (i) in most cases NS-NS systems dominate the merger rates in the local Universe, while BH-BH mergers dominate at high redshift; (ii) BH-NS mergers are less frequent than other sources per unit volume, for all time; and (iii) natal kicks may alter the observable properties of populations in a significant way, allowing the underlying models of binary evolution and compact object formation to be easily distinguished. This is the second paper in a series of three. The third paper will focus on calculating the detection rates of mergers by gravitational wave telescopes.
  • High redshift galaxies permit the study of the formation and evolution of X-ray binary populations on cosmological timescales, probing a wide range of metallicities and star-formation rates. In this paper, we present results from a large scale population synthesis study that models the X-ray binary populations from the first galaxies of the universe until today. We use as input to our modeling the Millennium II Cosmological Simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. (2011) to self-consistently account for the star formation history and metallicity evolution of the universe. Our modeling, which is constrained by the observed X-ray properties of local galaxies, gives predictions about the global scaling of emission from X-ray binary populations with properties such as star-formation rate and stellar mass, and the evolution of these relations with redshift. Our simulations show that the X-ray luminosity density (X-ray luminosity per unit volume) from X-ray binaries in our Universe today is dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries, and it is only at z>2.5 that high-mass X-ray binaries become dominant. We also find that there is a delay of ~1.1 Gyr between the peak of X-ray emissivity from low-mass Xray binaries (at z~2.1) and the peak of star-formation rate density (at z~3.1). The peak of the X-ray luminosity from high-mass X-ray binaries (at z~3.9), happens ~0.8 Gyr before the peak of the star-formation rate density, which is due to the metallicity evolution of the Universe.
  • Cyg X-3 is a highly interesting accreting X-ray binary, emitting from the radio to high-energy gamma-rays. It consists of a compact object wind-fed by a Wolf-Rayet (WR) star, but the masses of the components and the mass-loss rate have been a subject of controversies. Here, we determine its masses, inclination, and the mass-loss rate using our derived relationship between the mass-loss rate and the mass for WR stars of the WN type, published infrared and X-ray data, and a relation between the mass-loss rate and the binary period derivative (observed to be >0 in Cyg X-3). Our obtained mass-loss rate is almost identical to that from two independent estimates and consistent with other ones, which strongly supports the validity of this solution. The found WR and compact object masses are 10.3_{-2.8}^{+3.9}, 2.4_{-1.1}^{+2.1} solar masses, respectively. Thus, our solution still allows for the presence of either a neutron star or a black hole, but the latter only with a low mass. However, the radio, infrared and X-ray properties of the system suggest that the compact object is a black hole. Such a low-mass black-hole could be formed via accretion-induced collapse or directly from a supernova.
  • We present results from deep X-ray stacking of >4000 high redshift galaxies from z~1 to 8 using the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) data, the deepest X-ray survey of the extragalactic sky to date. The galaxy samples were selected using the Lyman break technique based primarily on recent HST ACS and WFC3 observations. Based on such high specific star formation rates (sSFRs): log SFR/M* > -8.7, we expect that the observed properties of these LBGs are dominated by young stellar populations. The X-ray emission in LBGs, eliminating individually detected X-ray sources (potential AGN), is expected to be powered by X-ray binaries and hot gas. We find, for the first time, evidence of evolution in the X-ray/SFR relation. Based on X-ray stacking analyses for z<4 LBGs (covering ~90% of the Universe's history), we find that the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity evolves weakly with redshift (z) and SFR as log LX = 0.93 log (1+z) + 0.65 log SFR + 39.80. By comparing our observations with sophisticated X-ray binary population synthesis models, we interpret that the redshift evolution of LX/SFR is driven by metallicity evolution in HMXBs, likely the dominant population in these high sSFR galaxies. We also compare these models with our observations of X-ray luminosity density (total 2-10 keV luminosity per Mpc^3) and find excellent agreement. While there are no significant stacked detections at z>5, we use our upper limits from 5<z<8 LBGs to constrain the SMBH accretion history of the Universe around the epoch of reionization.
  • There are no known double black hole (BH-BH) or black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) systems. We argue that Cyg X-3 is a very likely BH-BH or BH-NS progenitor. This Galactic X-ray binary consists of a compact object, wind-fed by a Wolf-Rayet (WR) type companion. Based on a comprehensive analysis of observational data, it was recently argued that Cyg X-3 harbors a 2-4.5 Msun BH and a 7.5-14.2 Msun WR companion. We find that the fate of such a binary leads to the prompt (<1 Myr) formation of a close BH-BH system for the high end of the allowed WR mass (M_WR>13 Msun). For the low- to mid-mass range of the WR star (M_WR=7-10 Msun) Cyg X-3 is most likely (probability 70%) disrupted when WR ends up as a supernova. However, with smaller probability, it may form a wide (15%) or a close (15%) BH-NS system. The advanced LIGO/VIRGO detection rate for mergers of BH-BH systems from the Cyg X-3 formation channel is 10 per year, while it drops down to 0.1 per year for BH-NS systems. If Cyg X-3 in fact hosts a low mass BH and massive WR star, it lends additional support for the existence of BH-BH/BH-NS systems.
  • The last decade of observational and theoretical developments in stellar and binary evolution provides an opportunity to incorporate major improvements to the predictions from populations synthesis models. We compute the Galactic merger rates for NS-NS, BH-NS, and BH-BH mergers with the StarTrack code. The most important revisions include: updated wind mass loss rates (allowing for stellar mass black holes up to $80 \msun$), a realistic treatment of the common envelope phase (a process that can affect merger rates by 2--3 orders of magnitude), and a qualitatively new neutron star/black hole mass distribution (consistent with the observed "mass gap"). Our findings include: (i) The binding energy of the envelope plays a pivotal role in determining whether a binary merges within a Hubble time. (ii) Our description of natal kicks from supernovae plays an important role, especially for the formation of BH-BH systems. (iii) The masses of BH-BH systems can be substantially increased in the case of low metallicities or weak winds. (iv) Certain combinations of parameters underpredict the Galactic NS-NS merger rate, and can be ruled out. {\em (v)} Models incorporating delayed supernovae do not agree with the observed NS/BH "mass gap", in accordance with our previous work. This is the first in a series of three papers. The second paper will study the merger rates of double compact objects as a function of redshift, star formation rate, and metallicity. In the third paper we will present the detection rates for gravitational wave observatories, using up-to-date signal waveforms and sensitivity curves.