• The gravitational entropy and no-hair conjectures seems to predict contradictory future states of our Universe. The growth of the gravitational entropy is associated with the growth of inhomogeneity, while the no-hair conjecture argues that a universe dominated by dark energy should asymptotically approach a homogeneous and isotropic de Sitter state. The aim of this paper is to study these two conjectures. The investigation is based on the Simsilun simulation, which simulates the universe using the approximation of the Silent Universe. The Silent Universe is a solution to the Einstein equations that assumes irrotational, non-viscous, and insulated dust, with vanishing magnetic part of the Weyl curvature. The initial conditions for the Simsilun simulation are sourced from the Millennium simulation, which results with a realistically appearing but relativistic at origin simulation of a universe. The Simsilun simulation is evolved from the early universe (t = 25 Myr) till far future (t = 1000 Gyr). The results of this investigation show that both conjectures are correct. On global scales, a universe with a positive cosmological constant and non-positive spatial curvature does indeed approach the de Sitter state. At the same time it keeps generating the gravitational entropy.
  • Taipan is a multi-object spectroscopic galaxy survey starting in 2017 that will cover 2pi steradians over the southern sky, and obtain optical spectra for about two million galaxies out to z<0.4. Taipan will use the newly-refurbished 1.2m UK Schmidt Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory with the new TAIPAN instrument, which includes an innovative 'Starbugs' positioning system capable of rapidly and simultaneously deploying up to 150 spectroscopic fibres (and up to 300 with a proposed upgrade) over the 6-deg diameter focal plane, and a purpose-built spectrograph operating from 370 to 870nm with resolving power R>2000. The main scientific goals of Taipan are: (i) to measure the distance scale of the Universe (primarily governed by the local expansion rate, H_0) to 1% precision, and the structure growth rate of structure to 5%; (ii) to make the most extensive map yet constructed of the mass distribution and motions in the local Universe, using peculiar velocities based on improved Fundamental Plane distances, which will enable sensitive tests of gravitational physics; and (iii) to deliver a legacy sample of low-redshift galaxies as a unique laboratory for studying galaxy evolution as a function of mass and environment. The final survey, which will be completed within 5 years, will consist of a complete magnitude-limited sample (i<17) of about 1.2x10^6 galaxies, supplemented by an extension to higher redshifts and fainter magnitudes (i<18.1) of a luminous red galaxy sample of about 0.8x10^6 galaxies. Observations and data processing will be carried out remotely and in a fully-automated way, using a purpose-built automated 'virtual observer' software and an automated data reduction pipeline. The Taipan survey is deliberately designed to maximise its legacy value, by complementing and enhancing current and planned surveys of the southern sky at wavelengths from the optical to the radio.
  • Relativistic numerical cosmology is most often based either on the exact solutions of the Einstein equations, or perturbation theory, or weak-field limit, or the BSSN formalism. The Silent Universe provides an alternative approach to investigate relativistic evolution of cosmological systems. The silent universe is based on the solution of the Einstein equations in 3+1 comoving coordinates with additional constraints imposed. These constraints include: the gravitational field is sourced by dust and cosmological constant only, both rotation and magnetic part of the Weyl tensor vanish, and the shear is diagnosable. This paper describes the application of silent universes to investigate the evolution of cosmological systems. Using the Millennium simulation to set up the initial conditions, and comparing the evolution of the silent universe with the Millennium simulation it is found that the spatial curvature emerges due to nonlinear evolution of comics structures. This results with a slightly lower value of matter density $\Omega_M$ and a slightly higher value of the Hubble constant $H_0$ compared to the Millennium simulation. This could resolve some tensions between the cosmological parameters, which arise when one tries to fit a single spatially flat model to explain properties of the low-redshift and high-redshift universe.
  • This paper investigates the phenomenon of emergence of spatial curvature. This phenomenon is absent in the Standard Cosmological Model, which has a flat and fixed spatial curvature (small perturbations are considered in the Standard Cosmological Model but their global average vanishes, leading to spatial flatness at all times). This paper shows that with the nonlinear growth of cosmic structures the global average deviates from zero. The analysis is based on the {\em silent universes} (a wide class of inhomogeneous cosmological solutions of the Einstein equations). The initial conditions are set in the early universe as perturbations around the $\Lambda$CDM model with $\Omega_m = 0.31$, $\Omega_\Lambda = 0.69$, and $H_0 = 67.8$ km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$. As the growth of structures becomes nonlinear, the model deviates from the $\Lambda$CDM model, and at the present instant if averaged over a domain ${\cal D}$ with volume $V = (2150\,{\rm Mpc})^3$ (at these scales the cosmic variance is negligibly small) gives: $\Omega_m^{\cal D} = 0.22$, $\Omega_\Lambda^{\cal D} = 0.61$, $\Omega_{\cal R}^{\cal D} = 0.15$ (in the FLRW limit $\Omega_{\cal R}^{\cal D} \to \Omega_k$), and $\langle H \rangle_{\cal D} = 72.2$ km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$. Given the fact that low-redshift observations favor higher values of the Hubble constant and lower values of matter density, compared to the CMB constraints, the emergence of the spatial curvature in the low-redshift universe could be a possible solution to these discrepancies.
  • This paper discusses the phenomenon of backreaction within the Szekeres model. Cosmological backreaction describes how the mean global evolution of the Universe deviates from the Friedmannian evolution. The analysis is based on models of a single cosmological environment and the global ensemble of the Szekeres models (of the Swiss-Cheese-type and Styrofoam-type). The obtained results show that non-linear growth of cosmic structures is associated with the growth of the spatial curvature $\Omega_{\cal R}$ (in the FLRW limit $\Omega_{\cal R} \to \Omega_k$). If averaged over global scales the result depends on the assumed global model of the Universe. Within the Swiss-Cheese model, which does have a fixed background, the volume average follows the evolution of the background, and the global spatial curvature averages out to zero (the background model is the $\Lambda$CDM model, which is spatially flat). In the Styrofoam-type model, which does not have a fixed background, the mean evolution deviates from the spatially flat $\Lambda$CDM model, and the mean spatial curvature evolves to from $\Omega_{\cal R} =0 $ at the CMB to $\Omega_{\cal R} \sim 0.1$ at $z =0$. If the Styrofoam-type model correctly captures evolutionary features of the real Universe then one should expect that in our Universe, the spatial curvature should build up (local growth of cosmic structures) and its mean global average should deviate from zero (backreaction). As a result, this paper predicts that the low-redshift Universe should not be spatially flat (i.e. $\Omega_k \ne 0$, even if in the early Universe $\Omega_k = 0$) and therefore when analysing low-$z$ cosmological data one should keep $\Omega_k$ as a free parameter and independent from the CMB constraints.
  • Astronomical observations reveal hierarchical structures in the Universe, from galaxies, groups of galaxies, clusters and superclusters, to filaments and voids. On the largest scales it seems that some kind of statistical homogeneity can be observed. As a result, modern cosmological models are based on spatially homogeneous and isotropic solutions of the Einstein equations, and the evolution of the universe is approximated by the Friedmann equations. In parallel to standard homogeneous cosmology, the field of inhomogeneous cosmology and backreaction is being developed. This field investigates whether small scale inhomogeneities via non-linear effects can backreact and alter the properties of the Universe on its largest scales, leading to a non-Friedmannian evolution. This paper presents the current status of inhomogeneous cosmology and backreaction. It also discusses future prospects of the field of inhomogeneous cosmology, which is based on a survey of 50 academics working in the field of inhomogeneous cosmology.
  • The Universe on scales $10-100~h^{-1}$ Mpc is dominated by a cosmic web of voids, filaments, sheets and knots of galaxy clusters. These structures participate differently in the global expansion of the Universe: from non-expanding clusters to the above average expansion rate of voids. In this paper we characterize Hubble expansion anisotropies in the COMPOSITE sample of 4534 galaxies and clusters. We concentrate on the dipole and quadrupole in the rest frame of the Local Group. These both have statistically significant amplitudes. These anisotropies, and their redshift dependence, cannot be explained solely by a boost of the Local Group in the Friedmann-Lema\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) model which expands isotropically in the rest frame of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. We simulate the local expansion of the Universe with inhomogeneous Szekeres models, which match the standard FLRW model on $> 100~h^{-1}$ Mpc scales but exhibit nonkinematic relativistic differential expansion on small scales. We restrict models to be consistent with observed CMB temperature anisotropies, while simultaneously fitting the redshift variation of the Hubble expansion dipole. We include features to account for both the Local Void and the "Great Attractor". While this naturally accounts for the Hubble expansion and CMB dipoles, the simulated quadrupoles are smaller than observed. Further refinement to incorporate additional structures may improve this. This would enable a test of the hypothesis that some large angle CMB anomalies result from failing to treat the relativistic differential expansion of the background geometry, a natural feature of solutions to Einstein's equations not included in the current standard model of cosmology.
  • We present a new test of the validity of the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric, based on comparing the distance from redshift 0 to $z_1$ and from $z_1$ to $z_2$ to the distance from $0$ to $z_2$. If the universe is described by the FLRW metric, the comparison provides a model-independent measurement of spatial curvature. The test relies on geometrical optics, it is independent of the matter content of the universe and the applicability of the Einstein equation on cosmological scales. We apply the test to observations, using the Union2.1 compilation of supernova distances and Sloan Lens ACS Survey galaxy strong lensing data. The FLRW metric is consistent with the data, and the spatial curvature parameter is constrained to be $-1.22<\Omega_{K0}<0.63$, or $-0.08<\Omega_{K0}<0.97$ with a prior from the cosmic microwave background and the local Hubble constant, though modelling of the lenses is a source of significant systematic uncertainty.
  • Do current observational data confirm the assumptions of the cosmological principle, or is there statistical evidence for deviations from spatial homogeneity on large scales? To address these questions, we developed a flexible framework based on spherically symmetric, but radially inhomogeneous Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models with synchronous Big Bang. We expanded the (local) matter density profile in terms of flexible interpolation schemes and orthonormal polynomials. A Monte Carlo technique in combination with recent observational data was used to systematically vary the shape of these profiles. In the first part of this article, we reconsider giant LTB voids without dark energy to investigate whether extremely fine-tuned mass profiles can reconcile these models with current data. While the local Hubble rate and supernovae can easily be fitted without dark energy, however, model-independent constraints from the Planck 2013 data require an unrealistically low local Hubble rate, which is strongly inconsistent with the observed value; this result agrees well with previous studies. In the second part, we explain why it seems natural to extend our framework by a non-zero cosmological constant, which then allows us to perform general tests of the cosmological principle. Moreover, these extended models facilitate explorating whether fluctuations in the local matter density profile might potentially alleviate the tension between local and global measurements of the Hubble rate, as derived from Cepheid-calibrated type Ia supernovae and CMB experiments, respectively. We show that current data provide no evidence for deviations from spatial homogeneity on large scales. More accurate constraints are required to ultimately confirm the validity of the cosmological principle, however.
  • This paper studies intermediate homogenization of inhomogeneous cosmological models. It shows that spherically symmetric models, regardless of the equation of state, can undergo intermediate homogenization, i.e. a model can approach a homogeneous and isotropic state (which acts as a saddle point) from a relatively wide range of initial inhomogeneous conditions. The homogenization is not permanent - just temporary. Eventually the model evolves toward a future inhomogeneous state. We also looked at the problem of the gravitational entropy. All definitions of entropy that we checked give decreasing gravitational entropy during the homogenization process. Thus, we should either accept that gravitational entropy can decrease or try to define it in other ways than just via density gradients, as these decrease during homogenization.
  • After introducing the Szekeres and Lema\^{\i}tre--Tolman cosmological models, the real-time cosmology program is briefly mentioned. Then, a few widespread misconceptions about the cosmological models are pointed out and corrected. Investigation of null geodesic equations in the Szekeres models shows that observers in favourable positions would see galaxies drift across the sky at a rate of up to $10^{-6}$ arc seconds per year. Such a drift would be possible to measure using devices that are under construction; the required time of monitoring would be $\approx10$ years. This effect is zero in the FLRW models, so it provides a measure of inhomogeneity of the Universe. In the Szekeres models, the condition for zero drift is zero shear. But in the shearfree normal models, the condition for zero drift is that, in the comoving coordinates, the time dependence of the metric completely factors out.
  • More than half of the volume of our Universe is occupied by cosmic voids. The lensing magnification effect from those under-dense regions is generally thought to give a small dimming contribution: objects on the far side of a void are supposed to be observed as slightly smaller than if the void were not there, which together with conservation of surface brightness implies net reduction in photons received. This is predicted by the usual weak lensing integral of the density contrast along the line of sight. We show that this standard effect is swamped at low redshifts by a relativistic Doppler term that is typically neglected. Contrary to the usual expectation, objects on the far side of a void are brighter than they would be otherwise. Thus the local dynamics of matter in and near the void is crucial and is only captured by the full relativistic lensing convergence. There are also significant nonlinear corrections to the relativistic linear theory, which we show actually under-predicts the effect. We use exact solutions to estimate that these can be more than 20% for deep voids. This remains an important source of systematic errors for weak lensing density reconstruction in galaxy surveys and for supernovae observations, and may be the cause of the reported extra scatter of field supernovae located on the edge of voids compared to those in clusters.
  • Geometric properties of the quasi-hyperbolic Szekeres models are discussed and related to the quasi-spherical Szekeres models. Typical examples of shapes of various classes of 2-dimensional coordinate surfaces are shown in graphs; for the hyperbolically symmetric subcase and for the general quasi-hyperbolic case. An analysis of the mass function $M(z)$ is carried out in parallel to an analogous analysis for the quasi-spherical models. This leads to the conclusion that $M(z)$ determines the density of rest mass averaged over the whole space of constant time.
  • The notion of an apparent horizon (AH) in a collapsing object can be carried over from the Lema\^{\i}tre -- Tolman (L--T) to the quasispherical Szekeres models in three ways: 1. Literally by the definition -- the AH is the boundary of the region, in which every bundle of null geodesics has negative expansion scalar. 2. As the locus, at which null lines that are as nearly radial as possible are turned toward decreasing areal radius $R$. These lines are in general nongeodesic. The name "absolute apparent horizon" (AAH) is proposed for this locus. 3. As the boundary of a region, where null \textit{geodesics} are turned toward decreasing $R$. The name "light collapse region" (LCR) is proposed for this region (which is 3-dimensional in every space of constant $t$); its boundary coincides with the AAH. The AH and AAH coincide in the L--T models. In the quasispherical Szekeres models, the AH is different from (but not disjoint with) the AAH. Properties of the AAH and LCR are investigated, and the relations between the AAH and the AH are illustrated with diagrams using an explicit example of a Szekeres metric. It turns out that an observer who is already within the AH is, for some time, not yet within the AAH. Nevertheless, no light signal can be sent through the AH from the inside. The analogue of the AAH for massive particles is also considered.
  • The Universe is inhomogeneous, and yet it seems to be incredibly well-characterised by a homogeneous relativistic model. One of the current challenges is to accurately characterise the properties of such a model. In this paper we explore how inhomogeneities may affect the overall optical properties of the Universe by quantifying how they can bias the redshift-distance relation in a number of toy models that mimic the real Universe. The models that we explore are statistically homogeneous on large scales. We find that the effect of inhomogeneities is of order of a few percent, which can be quite important in precise estimation of cosmological parameters. We discuss what lessons can be learned to help us tackle a more realistic inhomogeneous universe.
  • We obtain an elegant and useful description of the dynamics of Szekeres dust models (in their full generality) by means of `quasi-local' scalar variables constructed by suitable integral distributions that can be interpreted as weighed proper volume averages of the local covariant scalars. In terms of these variables, the field equations and basic physical and geometric quantities are formally identical to their corresponding expressions in the spherically symmetric LTB dust models. Since we can map every Szekeres model to a unique LTB model, rigorous results valid for the latter models can be readily generalized to a non-spherical Szekeres geometry. The new variables lead naturally to an initial value formulation in which all scalars are expressed as scaling laws in terms of their values at an arbitrary initial space slice. These variables also yield a significant simplification of numerical work, since the fluid flow evolution equations become a system of autonomous ordinary differential equations subjected to algebraic constraints containing the information on the deviations from spherical symmetry. As an example of how this formalism can be applied, we show that spherical symmetry is stable against small dipole-like perturbations. This new approach to the dynamics of the Szekeres solutions has an enormous potential for dealing with a wide variety of theoretical issues and for constructing non-spherical models of cosmological inhomogeneities to fit observational data.
  • Recently, inhomogeneous generalisations of the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmological models have gained interest in the astrophysical community and are more often employed to study cosmological phenomena. However, in many papers the inhomogeneous cosmological models are treated as an alternative to the FLRW models. In fact, they are not an alternative, but an exact perturbation of the latter, and are gradually becoming a necessity in modern cosmology. The assumption of homogeneity is just a first approximation introduced to simplify equations. So far this assumption is commonly believed to have worked well, but future and more precise observations will not be properly analysed unless inhomogeneities are taken into account. This paper reviews recent developments in the field and shows the importance of an inhomogeneous framework in the analysis of cosmological observations.
  • This paper presents the algorithm for determining the Lemaitre-Tolman (LT) model that best fits given datasets for maximum stellar ages, and SNIa luminosities, both as functions of redshift. It then applies it to current cosmological data. Special attention must be given to the handling of the origin, and the region of the maximum diameter distances. As with a previous combination of datasets (galaxy number counts and luminosity distances versus redshift), there are relationships that must hold at the region of the maximum diameter distance, which are unlikely to be obeyed exactly by real data. We show how to make corrections that enable a self-consistent solution to be found. We address the questions of the best way to approximate discrete data with smooth functions, and how to estimate the uncertainties of the output - the 3 free functions that determine a specific LT metric. While current data does not permit any confidence in our results, we show that the method works well, and reasonable LT models do fit with or without a cosmological constant.
  • The set of differential equations obeyed by the redshift in the general $\beta' \neq 0$ Szekeres spacetimes is derived. Transversal components of the ray's momentum have to be taken into account, which leads to a set of 3 coupled differential equations. It is shown that in a general Szekeres model, and in a general Lema\^{\i}tre -- Tolman (L--T) model, generic light rays do not have repeatable paths (RLPs): two rays sent from the same source at different times to the same observer pass through different sequences of intermediate matter particles. The only spacetimes in the Szekeres class in which {\em all} rays are RLPs are the Friedmann models. Among the proper Szekeres models, RLPs exist only in the axially symmetric subcases, and in each one the RLPs are the null geodesics that intersect each $t =$ constant space on the symmetry axis. In the special models with a 3-dimensional symmetry group (L--T among them), the only RLPs are radial geodesics. This shows that RLPs are very special and in the real Universe should not exist. We present several numerical examples which suggest that the rate of change of positions of objects in the sky, for the studied configuration, is $10^{-6} - 10^{-7}$ arc sec per year. With the current accuracy of direction measurement, this drift would become observable after approx. 10 years of monitoring. More precise future observations will be able, in principle, to detect this effect, but there are basic problems with determining the reference direction that does not change.
  • Inhomogeneous cosmological models are able to fit cosmological observations without dark energy under the assumption that we live close to the "center" of a very large-scale under-dense region. Most studies fitting observations by means of inhomogeneities also assume spherical symmetry, and thus being at (or very near) the center may imply being located at a very special and unlikely observation point. We argue that such spherical voids should be treated only as a gross first approximation to configurations that follow from a suitable smoothing out of the non-spherical part of the inhomogeneities on angular scales. In this Letter we present a toy construction that supports the above statement. The construction uses parts of the Szekeres model, which is inhomogeneous and anisotropic thus it also addresses the limitations of spherical inhomogeneities. By using the thin-shell approximation (which means that the Israel-Darmois continuity conditions are not fulfilled between the shells) we construct a model of evolving cosmic structures, containing several elongated supercluster-like structures with underdense regions between them, which altogether provides a reasonable coarse-grained description of cosmic structures. While this configuration is not spherically symmetric, its proper volume average yields a spherical void profile of 250 Mpc that roughly agrees with observations. Also, by considering a non-spherical inhomogeneity, the definition of a "center" location becomes more nuanced, and thus the constraints placed by fitting observations on our position with respect to this location become less restrictive.
  • We use different particular classes of axially symmetric Szekeres Swiss-cheese models for the study of the apparent dimming of the supernovae of type Ia. We compare the results with those obtained in the corresponding Lemaitre-Tolman Swiss-cheese models. Although the quantitative picture is different the qualitative results are comparable, i.e, one cannot fully explain the dimming of the supernovae using small scale ~50 Mpc inhomogeneities. To fit successfully the data we need structures of order of 500 Mpc size or larger. However, this result might be an artifact due to the use of axial light rays in axially symmetric models. Anyhow, this work is a first step in trying to use Szekeres Swiss-cheese models in cosmology and it will be followed by the study of more physical models with still less symmetry.
  • The standard analysis of the CMB data assumes that the distance to the last scattering surface can be calculated using the distance-redshift relation as in the Friedmann model. However, in the inhomogeneous universe, even if <\delta\rho> =0, the distance relation is not the same as in the unperturbed universe. This can be of serious consequences as a change of distance affects the mapping of CMB temperature fluctuations into the angular power spectrum. In addition, if the change of distance is relatively uniform no new temperature fluctuations are generated. It is therefore a different effect than the lensing or ISW effects which introduce additional CMB anisotropies. This paper shows that the accuracy of the CMB analysis can be impaired by the accuracy of calculation of the distance within the cosmological models. Since this effect has not been fully explored before, to test how the inhomogeneities affect the distance-redshift relation, several methods are examined: the Dyer-Roeder relation, lensing approximation, and non-linear Swiss-Cheese model. In all cases, the distance to the last scattering surface is different than when homogeneity is assumed. The difference can be as low as 1% and as high as 80%. Excluding extreme cases, the distance changes by about 20-30%. Since the distance to the last scattering surface is set by the position of the CMB peaks, in order to have a good fit, the distance needs to be adjusted. After correcting the distance, the cosmological parameters change. Therefore, a not properly estimated distance to the last scattering surface can be a major source of systematics. This paper shows that if inhomogeneities are taken into account when calculating the distance then models with positive spatial curvature and with \Omega_\Lambda ~ 0.8-0.9 are preferred. The \Lambda CDM model in most cases, is at odds with the current data.
  • The distance-redshift relation plays an important role in cosmology. In the standard approach to cosmology it is assumed that this relation is the same as in the homogeneous universe. As the real universe is not homogeneous there are several methods to calculate the correction. The weak lensing approximation and the Dyer-Roeder relation are one of them. This paper establishes a link between these two approximations. It is shown that if the universe is homogeneous with only small, vanishing after averaging, density fluctuations along the line of sight, then the distance correction is negligible. It is also shown that a vanishing 3D average of density fluctuations does not imply that the mean of density fluctuations along the line of sight is zero. In this case, even within the linear approximation, the distance correction is not negligible. The modified version of the Dyer-Roeder relation is presented and it is shown that this modified relation is consistent with the correction obtained within the weak lensing approximation. The correction to the distance for a source at z ~ 2 is of order of a few percent. Thus, with an increasing precision of cosmological observations an accurate estimation of the distance is essential. Otherwise errors due to miscalculation the distance can become a major source of systematics.
  • Dark energy is now one of the most important and topical problems in cosmology. The first step to reveal its nature is to detect the evolution of dark energy or to prove beyond doubt that the cosmological constant is indeed constant. However, in the standard approach to cosmology, the Universe is described by the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann models. Here we show that in the perturbed universe (even if perturbations vanish if averaged over sufficiently large scales) the distance-redshift relation is not the same as in the unperturbed universe. This has a serious consequence when studying the nature of dark energy and, as shown here, can impair the analysis and studies of dark energy. The analysis is based on two methods: the linear lensing approximation and the non-linear Szekeres Swiss-Cheese model. The inhomogeneity scale is ~50 Mpc, and both models have the same density fluctuations along the line of sight. The comparison between linear and non-linear methods shows that non-linear corrections are not negligible. When inhomogeneities are present the distance changes by several percent. To show how this change influences the measurements of dark energy, ten future observations with 2% uncertainties are generated. It is shown the using the standard methods (i.e. under the assumption of homogeneity) the systematics due to inhomogeneities can distort our analysis, and may lead to a conclusion that dark energy evolves when in fact it is constant (or vice versa). Therefore, if future observations are analysed only within the homogeneous framework then the impact of inhomogeneities (such as voids and superclusters) can be mistaken for evolving dark energy. Since the robust distinction between the evolution and non-evolution of dark energy is the first step to understanding the nature of dark energy a proper handling of inhomogeneities is essential.
  • Lema\^itre - Tolman (L--T) toy models with a central observer have been used to study the effect of large scale inhomogeneities on the SN Ia dimming. Claims that a giant void is mandatory to explain away dark energy in this framework are currently dominating. Our aim is to show that L-T models exist that reproduce a few features of the $\Lambda$CDM model, but do not contain the giant cosmic void. We propose to use two sets of data - the angular diameter distance together with the redshift-space mass-density and the angular diameter distance together with the expansion rate - both defined on the past null cone as functions of the redshift. We assume that these functions are of the same form as in the $\Lambda$CDM model. Using the Mustapha-Hellaby-Ellis algorithm, we numerically transform these initial data into the usual two L-T arbitrary functions and solve the evolution equation to calculate the mass distribution in spacetime. For both models, we find that the current density profile does not exhibit a giant void, but rather a giant hump. However, this hump is not directly observable, since it is in a spacelike relation to a present observer. The alleged existence of the giant void was a consequence of the L-T models used earlier because their generality was limited a priori by needless simplifying assumptions, like, for example, the bang-time function being constant. Instead, one can feed any mass distribution or expansion rate history on the past light cone as initial data to the L-T evolution equation. When a fully general L-T metric is used, the giant void is not implied.