• Interfaces between crystalline materials have been an essential engineering platform for modern electronics. At the interfaces in two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures, the twist-tunability offered by vdW crystals allows the construction of a quasiperiodic moir\'e superlattice of tunable length scale, leading to unprecedented access to exotic physical phenomena. However, these interfaces exhibit more intriguing structures than the simple moir\'e pattern. The vdW interaction that favors interlayer commensurability competes against the intralayer elastic lattice distortion, causing interfacial reconstruction with significant modification to the electronic structure. Here we demonstrate engineered atomic-scale reconstruction at the vdW interface between two graphene layers by controlling the twist angle. Employing transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we find local commensuration of Bernal stacked graphene within each domain, separated by incommensurate structural solitons. We observe electronic transport along the triangular network of one-dimensional (1D) topological channels as the electronic bands in the alternating domains are gapped out by a transverse electric field. The atomic scale reconstruction in a twisted vdW interface further enables engineering 2D heterostructures with continuous tunability.
  • In this paper, we investigate multi-message authentication to combat adversaries with infinite computational capacity. An authentication framework over a wiretap channel $(W_1,W_2)$ is proposed to achieve information-theoretic security with the same key. The proposed framework bridges the two research areas in physical (PHY) layer security: secure transmission and message authentication. Specifically, the sender Alice first transmits message $M$ to the receiver Bob over $(W_1,W_2)$ with an error correction code; then Alice employs a hash function (i.e., $\varepsilon$-AWU$_2$ hash functions) to generate a message tag $S$ of message $M$ using key $K$, and encodes $S$ to a codeword $X^n$ by leveraging an existing strongly secure channel coding with exponentially small (in code length $n$) average probability of error; finally, Alice sends $X^n$ over $(W_1,W_2)$ to Bob who authenticates the received messages. We develop a theorem regarding the requirements/conditions for the authentication framework to be information-theoretic secure for authenticating a polynomial number of messages in terms of $n$. Based on this theorem, we propose an authentication protocol that can guarantee the security requirements, and prove its authentication rate can approach infinity when $n$ goes to infinity. Furthermore, we design and implement an efficient and feasible authentication protocol over binary symmetric wiretap channel (BSWC) by using \emph{Linear Feedback Shifting Register} based (LFSR-based) hash functions and strong secure polar code. Through extensive experiments, it is demonstrated that the proposed protocol can achieve low time cost, high authentication rate, and low authentication error rate.
  • Molecules are the most demanding quantum systems to be simulated by quantum computers because of their complexity and the emergent role of quantum nature. The recent theoretical proposal of Huh et al. (Nature Photon., 9, 615 (2015)) showed that a multi-photon network with a Gaussian input state can simulate a molecular spectroscopic process. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of molecular vibrational spectroscopy of SO$_{2}$ with a trapped-ion system. In our realization, the molecular scattering operation is decomposed to a series of elementary quantum optical operations, which are implemented through Raman laser beams, resulting in a multimode Gaussian (Bogoliubov) transformation. The molecular spectroscopic signal is reconstructed from the collective projection measurements on phonon modes of the trapped-ion system. Our experimental demonstration would pave the way to large-scale molecular quantum simulations, which are classically intractable.
  • A standard method to obtain information on a quantum state is to measure marginal distributions along many different axes in phase space, which forms a basis of quantum state tomography. We theoretically propose and experimentally demonstrate a general framework to manifest nonclassicality by observing a single marginal distribution only, which provides a novel insight into nonclassicality and a practical applicability to various quantum systems. Our approach maps the 1-dim marginal distribution into a factorized 2-dim distribution by multiplying the measured distribution or the vacuum-state distribution along an orthogonal axis. The resulting fictitious Wigner function becomes unphysical only for a nonclassical state, thus the negativity of the corresponding density operator provides an evidence of nonclassicality. Furthermore, the negativity measured this way yields a lower bound for entanglement potential---a measure of entanglement generated using a nonclassical state with a beam splitter setting that is a prototypical model to produce continuous-variable (CV) entangled states. Our approach detects both Gaussian and non-Gaussian nonclassical states in a reliable and efficient manner. Remarkably, it works regardless of measurement axis for all non-Gaussian states in finite-dimensional Fock space of any size, also extending to infinite-dimensional states of experimental relevance for CV quantum informatics. We experimentally illustrate the power of our criterion for motional states of a trapped ion confirming their nonclassicality in a measurement-axis independent manner. We also address an extension of our approach combined with phase-shift operations, which leads to a stronger test of nonclassicality, i.e. detection of genuine non-Gaussianity under a CV measurement.
  • Quantum field theories describe a wide variety of fundamental phenomena in physics. However, their study often involves cumbersome numerical simulations. Quantum simulators, on the other hand, may outperform classical computational capacities due to their potential scalability. Here, we report an experimental realization of a quantum simulation of fermion-antifermion scattering mediated by bosonic modes, using a multilevel trapped ion, which is a simplified model of fermion scattering in both perturbative and nonperturbative quantum electrodynamics. The simulated model exhibits prototypical features in quantum field theory including particle pair creation and annihilation, as well as self-energy interactions. These are experimentally observed by manipulating four internal levels of a $^{171}\mathrm{Yb}^{+}$ trapped ion, where we encode the fermionic modes, and two motional degrees of freedom that simulate the bosonic modes. Our experiment establishes an avenue towards the efficient implementation of fermionic and bosonic quantum field modes, which may prove useful in scalable studies of quantum field theories in perturbative and nonperturbative regimes.
  • Mobile sensing has become a promising paradigm for mobile users to obtain information by task crowdsourcing. However, due to the social preferences of mobile users, the quality of sensing reports may be impacted by the underlying social attributes and selfishness of individuals. Therefore, it is crucial to consider the social impacts and trustworthiness of mobile users when selecting task participants in mobile sensing. In this paper, we propose a Social Aware Crowdsourcing with Reputation Management (SACRM) scheme to select the well-suited participants and allocate the task rewards in mobile sensing. Specifically, we consider the social attributes, task delay and reputation in crowdsourcing and propose a participant selection scheme to choose the well-suited participants for the sensing task under a fixed task budget. A report assessment and rewarding scheme is also introduced to measure the quality of the sensing reports and allocate the task rewards based the assessed report quality. In addition, we develop a reputation management scheme to evaluate the trustworthiness and cost performance ratio of mobile users for participant selection. Theoretical analysis and extensive simulations demonstrate that SACRM can efficiently improve the crowdsourcing utility and effectively stimulate the participants to improve the quality of their sensing reports.