• We combine three-dimensional (3D) large-eddy simulations (LES) and resolvent analysis to design active separation control techniques on a NACA 0012 airfoil. Spanwise-periodic flows over the airfoil at a chord-based Reynolds number of $23,000$ and a free-stream Mach number of $0.3$ are considered at two post-stall angles of attack of $6^\circ$ and $9^\circ$. Near the leading edge, localized unsteady thermal actuation is introduced in an open-loop manner with two tunable parameters of actuation frequency and spanwise wavelength. For the most successful control case that achieves full reattachment, we observe a reduction in drag by up to $49\%$ and increase in lift by up to $54\%$. To provide physics-based guidance for the effective choice of these control input parameters, we conduct global resolvent analysis on the baseline turbulent mean flows to identify the actuation frequency and wavenumber that provide high energy amplification. The present analysis also considers the use of a temporal filter to limit the time horizon for assessing the energy amplification to extend resolvent analysis to unstable base flows. We incorporate the amplification and response mode from resolvent analysis to provide a metric that quantifies momentum mixing associated with the modal structure. By comparing this metric from resolvent analysis and the LES results of controlled flows, we demonstrate that resolvent analysis can predict the effective range of actuation frequency as well as the global response to the actuation input. Supported by the agreements between the results from resolvent analysis and LES, we believe that this study provides insights for the use of resolvent analysis in guiding future active flow control.
  • The present work investigates sidewall effects on the characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) compressible flows over a rectangular cavity with aspect ratios of $L/D=6$ and $W/D=2$ at $Re_D=10^4$ using large eddy simulations (LES). For the spanwise-periodic cavity flow, large pressure fluctuations are present in the shear layer and on the cavity aft wall due to spanwise vortex roll-ups and flow impingement. For the finite-span cavity with sidewalls, pressure fluctuations are reduced due to interference to the vortex roll-ups from the sidewalls. Flow oscillations are also reduced by increasing the Mach number from 0.6 to 1.4. Furthermore, secondary flow inside the cavity enhances kinetic energy transport in the spanwise direction. Moreover, 3D slotted jets are placed along the cavity leading edge with the objective of reducing flow oscillations. Steady blowing into the boundary layer is considered with momentum coefficient $C_\mu=0.0584$ and $0.0194$ for $M_\infty=0.6$ and $1.4$ cases, respectively. The three-dimensionality introduced to the flow by the jets inhibits large coherent roll-ups of the spanwise vortices in the shear layer, yielding $9-40\%$ reductions in rms pressure and rms velocity for both spanwise-periodic and finite-span cavities.
  • A network community-based reduced-order model is developed to capture key interactions amongst coherent structures in high-dimensional unsteady vortical flows. The present approach is data-inspired and founded on network-theoretic techniques to identify important vortical communities that are comprised of vortical elements that share similar dynamical behavior. The overall interaction-based physics of the high-dimensional flow field is distilled into the vortical community centroids, considerably reducing the system dimension. Taking advantage of these vortical interactions, the proposed methodology is applied to formulate reduced-order models for the inter-community dynamics of vortical flows, and predict lift and drag forces on bodies in wake flows. We demonstrate the capabilities of these models by accurately capturing the macroscopic dynamics of a collection of discrete point vortices, and the complex unsteady aerodynamic forces on a circular cylinder and an airfoil with a Gurney flap. The present formulation is found to be robust against simulated experimental noise and turbulence due to its integrating nature of the system reduction.
  • The stability properties of two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) compressible flows over a rectangular cavity with length-to-depth ratio of $L/D=6$ is analyzed at a free stream Mach number of $M_\infty=0.6$ and depth-based Reynolds number of $Re_D=502$. In this study, we closely examine the influence of three-dimensionality on the wake-mode that has been reported to exhibit high-amplitude fluctuations from the formation and ejection of large-scale spanwise vortices. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) and bi-global stability analysis are utilized to study the instability characteristics of the wake-mode. Using the bi-global stability analysis with the time-average flow as the base state, we capture the global stability properties of the wake-mode at a spanwise wavenumber of $\beta=0$. To uncover spanwise effects on the 2D wake-mode, 3D DNS are performed with cavity width-to-depth ratio of $W/D=1$ and $2$. We find that the 2D wake-mode is not present in the 3D cavity flow for a wider spanwise setting with $W/D=2$, in which spanwise structures are observed near the rear region of the cavity. These 3D instabilities are further investigated via bi-global stability analysis for spanwise wavelengths of $\lambda/D=0.5-2.0$ to reveal the eigenspectra of the 3D eigenmodes. Based on the findings of 2D and 3D global stability analysis, we conclude that the absence of the wake-mode in 3D rectangular cavity flows is due to the release of kinetic energy from the spanwise vortices to the streamwise vortical structures that develops from the spanwise instabilities.
  • We apply the phase-reduction analysis to examine synchronization properties of periodic fluid flows. The dynamics of unsteady flows are described in terms of the phase dynamics reducing the high-dimensional fluid flow to its single scalar phase variable. We characterize the phase response to impulse perturbations, which can in turn quantify the influence of periodic perturbations on the unsteady flow. These insights from the phase-based analysis uncover the condition for synchronization. In the present work, we study as an example the influence of periodic external forcing on unsteady cylinder wake. The condition for synchronization is identified and agrees closely with results from direct numerical simulations. Moreover, the analysis reveals the optimal forcing direction for synchronization. The phase-response analysis holds potential to uncover lock-on characteristics for a range of periodic flows.
  • The complex wake modifications produced by a Gurney flap on symmetric NACA airfoils at low Reynolds number are investigated. Two-dimensional incompressible flows over NACA 0000 (flat plate), 0006, 0012 and 0018 airfoils at a Reynolds number of $Re = 1000$ are analyzed numerically to examine the flow modifications generated by the flaps for achieving lift enhancement. While high lift can be attained by the Gurney flap on airfoils at high angles of attack, highly unsteady nature of the aerodynamic forces are also observed. Analysis of the wake structures along with the lift spectra reveals four characteristic wake modes (steady, 2S, P and 2P), influencing the aerodynamic performance. The effects of the flap over wide range of angles of attack and flap heights are considered to identify the occurrence of these wake modes, and are encapsulated in a wake classification diagram. Companion three-dimensional simulations are also performed to examine the influence of three-dimensionality on the wake regimes. The spanwise instabilities that appear for higher angles of attack are found to suppress the emergence of the 2P mode. The use of the wake classification diagram as a guidance for Gurney flap selection at different operating conditions to achieve the required aerodynamic performance is discussed.
  • Simple aerodynamic configurations under even modest conditions can exhibit complex flows with a wide range of temporal and spatial features. It has become common practice in the analysis of these flows to look for and extract physically important features, or modes, as a first step in the analysis. This step typically starts with a modal decomposition of an experimental or numerical dataset of the flow field, or of an operator relevant to the system. We describe herein some of the dominant techniques for accomplishing these modal decompositions and analyses that have seen a surge of activity in recent decades. For a non-expert, keeping track of recent developments can be daunting, and the intent of this document is to provide an introduction to modal analysis that is accessible to the larger fluid dynamics community. In particular, we present a brief overview of several of the well-established techniques and clearly lay the framework of these methods using familiar linear algebra. The modal analysis techniques covered in this paper include the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (Balanced POD), dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), Koopman analysis, global linear stability analysis, and resolvent analysis.
  • We discuss the use of 3D printing to physically visualize (materialize) fluid flow structures. Such 3D models can serve as a refreshing hands-on means to gain deeper physical insights into the formation of complex coherent structures in fluid flows. In this short paper, we present a general procedure for taking 3D flow field data and producing a file format that can be supplied to a 3D printer, with two examples of 3D printed flow structures. A sample code to perform this process is also provided. 3D printed flow structures can not only deepen our understanding of fluid flows but also allow us to showcase our research findings to be held up-close in educational and outreach settings.
  • A networked oscillator based analysis is performed for periodic bluff body flows to examine and control the transfer of kinetic energy. Spatial modes extracted from the flow field with corresponding amplitudes form a set of oscillators describing unsteady fluctuations. These oscillators are connected through a network that captures the energy exchanges amongst them. To extract the network of interactions among oscillators, amplitude and phase perturbations are impulsively introduced to the oscillators and the ensuing dynamics are analyzed. Using linear regression techniques, a networked oscillator model is constructed that reveals energy transfers and phase interactions among the modes. The model captures the nonlinear interactions amongst the modal oscillators through a linear approximation. A large collection of system responses are aggregated into a network model that captures interactions for general perturbations. The networked oscillator model describes the modal perturbation dynamics better than the empirical Galerkin reduced-order models. A model-based feedback controller is then designed to suppress modal amplitudes and the resulting wake unsteadiness leading to drag reduction. The strength of the proposed approach is demonstrated for a canonical example of two- dimensional unsteady flow over a circular cylinder. The present formulation enables the characterization of modal interactions to control fundamental energy transfers in unsteady vortical flows.
  • Direct numerical simulation is performed to study compressible, viscous flow around a circular cylinder. The present study considers two-dimensional, shock-free continuum flow by varying the Reynolds number between 20 and 100 and the freestream Mach number between 0 and 0.5. The results indicate that compressibility effects elongate the near wake for cases above and below the critical Reynolds number for two-dimensional flow under shedding. The wake elongation becomes more pronounced as the Reynolds number approaches this critical value. Moreover, we determine the growth rate and frequency of linear instability for cases above the critical Reynolds number. From the analysis, it is observed that the frequency of the B\'enard-von K\'arm\'an vortex street in the time-periodic, fully-saturated flow increases from the dominant unstable frequency found from the linear stability analysis as the Reynolds number increases from its critical value, even for the low range of Reynolds numbers considered. We also notice that the compressibility effects reduce the growth rate and dominant frequency in the linear growth stage. Semi-empirical functional relationships for the growth rate and the dominant frequency in linearized flow around the cylinder in terms of the Reynolds number and freestream Mach number are presented.
  • We examine discrete vortex dynamics in two-dimensional flow through a network-theoretic approach. The interaction of the vortices is represented with a graph, which allows the use of network-theoretic approaches to identify key vortex-to-vortex interactions. We employ sparsification techniques on these graph representations based on spectral theory for constructing sparsified models and evaluating the dynamics of vortices in the sparsified setup. Identification of vortex structures based on graph sparsification and sparse vortex dynamics are illustrated through an example of point-vortex clusters interacting amongst themselves. We also evaluate the performance of sparsification with increasing number of point vortices. The sparsified-dynamics model developed with spectral graph theory requires reduced number of vortex-to-vortex interactions but agrees well with the full nonlinear dynamics. Furthermore, the sparsified model derived from the sparse graphs conserves the invariants of discrete vortex dynamics. We highlight the similarities and differences between the present sparsified-dynamics model and the reduced-order models.
  • The present paper reports on our effort to characterize vortical interactions in complex fluid flows through the use of network analysis. In particular, we examine the vortex interactions in two-dimensional decaying isotropic turbulence and find that the vortical interaction network can be characterized by a weighted scale-free network. It is found that the turbulent flow network retains its scale-free behavior until the characteristic value of circulation reaches a critical value. Furthermore, we show that the two-dimensional turbulence network is resilient against random perturbations but can be greatly influenced when forcing is focused towards the vortical structures that are categorized as network hubs. These findings can serve as a network-analytic foundation to examine complex geophysical and thin-film flows and take advantage of the rapidly growing field of network theory, which complements ongoing turbulence research based on vortex dynamics, hydrodynamic stability, and statistics. While additional work is essential to extend the mathematical tools from network analysis to extract deeper physical insights of turbulence, an understanding of turbulence based on the interaction-based network-theoretic framework presents a promising alternative in turbulence modeling and control efforts.
  • The application of local periodic heating for controlling a spatially developing shear layer downstream of a finite-thickness splitter plate is examined by numerically solving the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. At the trailing edge of the plate, oscillatory heat flux boundary condition is prescribed as the thermal forcing input to the shear layer. The thermal forcing introduces low level of oscillatory surface vorticity flux and baroclinic vorticity at the actuation frequency in the vicinity of the trailing edge. The produced vortical perturbations can independently excite the fundamental instability that accounts for shear layer roll-up as well as the subharmonic instability that encourages the vortex pairing process farther downstream. We demonstrate that the nonlinear dynamics of a spatially developing shear layer can be modified by local oscillatory heat flux as a control input. We believe that this study provides a basic foundation for flow control using thermal-energy-deposition-based actuators such as thermophones and plasma actuators.