• We review a unified approach for computing: (i) spin-transfer torque in magnetic trilayers like spin-valves and magnetic tunnel junction, where injected charge current flows perpendicularly to interfaces; and (ii) spin-orbit torque in magnetic bilayers of the type ferromagnet/spin-orbit-coupled-material, where injected charge current flows parallel to the interface. Our approach requires to construct the torque operator for a given Hamiltonian of the device and the steady-state nonequilibrium density matrix, where the latter is expressed in terms of the nonequilibrium Green's functions and split into three contributions. Tracing these contributions with the torque operator automatically yields field-like and damping-like components of spin-transfer torque or spin-orbit torque vector, which is particularly advantageous for spin-orbit torque where the direction of these components depends on the unknown-in-advance orientation of the current-driven nonequilibrium spin density in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. We provide illustrative examples by computing spin-transfer torque in a one-dimensional toy model of a magnetic tunnel junction and realistic Co/Cu/Co spin-valve, both of which are described by first-principles Hamiltonians obtained from noncollinear density functional theory calculations; as well as spin-orbit torque in a ferromagnetic layer described by a tight-binding Hamiltonian which includes spin-orbit proximity effect within ferromagnetic monolayers assumed to be generated by the adjacent monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide.
  • We present a straightforward and computationally cheap method to obtain the phonon-assisted photocurrent in large-scale devices from first-principles transport calculations. The photocurrent is calculated using nonequilibrium Green's function with light-matter interaction from the first-order Born approximation while electron-phonon coupling (EPC) is included through special thermal displacements (STD). We apply the method to a silicon solar cell device and demonstrate the impact of including EPC in order to properly describe the current due to the indirect band-to-band transitions. The first-principles results are successfully compared to experimental measurements of the temperature and light intensity dependence of the open-circuit voltage of a silicon photovoltaic module. Our calculations illustrate the pivotal role played by EPC in photocurrent modelling to avoid underestimation of the open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current and maximum power. This work represents a recipe for computational characterization of future photovoltaic devices including the combined effects of light-matter interaction, phonon-assisted tunneling and the device potential at finite bias from the level of first-principles simulations.
  • Phonon-assisted tunneling plays a crucial role for electronic device performance and even more so with future size down-scaling. We show how one can include this effect in large-scale first-principles calculations using a single "special thermal displacement" (STD) of the atomic coordinates at almost the same cost as elastic transport calculations. We apply the method to ultra-scaled silicon devices and demonstrate the importance of phonon-assisted band-to-band and source-to-drain tunneling. In a diode the phonons lead to a rectification ratio suppression in good agreement with experiments, while in an ultra-thin body transistor the phonons increase off-currents by four orders of magnitude, and the subthreshold swing by a factor of four, in agreement with perturbation theory.
  • We present an efficient implementation of a surface Green's-function method for atomistic modeling of surfaces within the framework of density functional theory using a pseudopotential localized basis set approach. In this method, the system is described as a truly semi-infinite solid with a surface region coupled to an electron reservoir, thereby overcoming several fundamental drawbacks of the traditional slab approach. The versatility of the method is demonstrated with several applications to surface physics and chemistry problems that are inherently difficult to address properly with the slab method, including metal work function calculations, band alignment in thin-film semiconductor heterostructures, surface states in metals and topological insulators, and surfaces in external electrical fields. Results obtained with the surface Green's-function method are compared to experimental measurements and slab calculations to demonstrate the accuracy of the approach.
  • The function of nano-scale devices critically depends on the choice of materials. For electron transport junctions it is natural to characterize the materials by their conductance length dependence, $\beta$. Theoretical estimations of $\beta$ are made employing two primary theories: complex band structure and DFT-NEGF Landauer transport. Both reveal information on $\beta$ of individual states; i.e. complex Bloch waves and transmission eigenchannels, respectively. However, it is unclear how the $\beta$-values of the two approaches compare. Here, we present calculations of decay constants for the two most conductive states as determined by complex band structure and standard DFT-NEGF transport calculations for two molecular and one semi-conductor junctions. Despite the different nature of the two methods, we find strong agreement of the calculated decay constants for the molecular junctions while the semi-conductor junction shows some discrepancies. The results presented here provide a template for studying the intrinsic, channel resolved length dependence of the junction through complex band structure of the central material in the heterogeneous nano-scale junction.
  • ATK-ForceField is a software package for atomistic simulations using classical interatomic potentials. It is implemented as a part of the Atomistix ToolKit (ATK), which is a Python programming environment that makes it easy to create and analyze both standard and highly customized simulations. This paper will focus on the atomic interaction potentials, molecular dynamics, and geometry optimization features of the software, however, many more advanced modeling features are available. The implementation details of these algorithms and their computational performance will be shown. We present three illustrative examples of the types of calculations that are possible with ATK-ForceField: modeling thermal transport properties in a silicon germanium crystal, vapor deposition of selenium molecules on a selenium surface, and a simulation of creep in a copper polycrystal.
  • We present evidence that band gap narrowing at the heterointerface may be a major cause of the large open circuit voltage deficit of Cu$_2$ZnSnS$_4$/CdS solar cells. Band gap narrowing is caused by surface states that extend the Cu$_2$ZnSnS$_4$ valence band into the forbidden gap. Those surface states are consistently found in Cu$_2$ZnSnS$_4$, but not in Cu$_2$ZnSnSe$_4$, by first-principles calculations. They do not simply arise from defects at surfaces but are an intrinsic feature of Cu$_2$ZnSnS$_4$ surfaces. By including those states in a device model, the outcome of previously published temperature-dependent open circuit voltage measurements on Cu$_2$ZnSnS$_4$ solar cells can be reproduced quantitatively without necessarily assuming a cliff-like conduction band offset with the CdS buffer layer. Our first-principles calculations indicate that Zn-based alternative buffer layers are advantageous due to the ability of Zn to passivate those surface states. Focusing future research on Zn-based buffers is expected to significantly improve the open circuit voltage and efficiency of pure-sulfide Cu$_2$ZnSnS$_4$ solar cells.
  • The geometry and structure of an interface ultimately determines the behavior of devices at the nanoscale. We present a generic method to determine the possible lattice matches between two arbitrary surfaces and to calculate the strain of the corresponding matched interface. We apply this method to explore two relevant classes of interfaces for which accurate structural measurements of the interface are available: (i) the interface between pentacene crystals and the (111) surface of gold, and (ii) the interface between the semiconductor indium-arsenide and aluminum. For both systems, we demonstrate that the presented method predicts interface geometries in good agreement with those measured experimentally, which present nontrivial matching characteristics and would be difficult to guess without relying on automated structure-searching methods.
  • We present a conceptually simple method for treating electron-phonon scattering and phonon limited mobilities. By combining Green's function based transport calculations and molecular dynamics (MD), we obtain a temperature dependent transmission from which we evaluate the mobility. We validate our approach by comparing to mobilities and conductivies obtained by the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) for different bulk and one-dimensional systems. For bulk silicon and gold we successfully compare against experimental values. We discuss limitations and advantages of each of the computational approaches.
  • We present calculations of the inelastic vibrational signals in the electrical current through a graphene nanoconstriction. We find that the inelastic signals are only present when the Fermi-level position is tuned to electron transmission resonances, thus, providing a fingerprint which can link an electron transmission resonance to originate from the nanoconstriction. The calculations are based on a novel first-principles method which includes the phonon broadening due to coupling with phonons in the electrodes. We find that the signals are modified due to the strong coupling to the electrodes, however, still remain as robust fingerprints of the vibrations in the nanoconstriction. We investigate the effect of including the full self-consistent potential drop due to finite bias and gate doping on the calculations and find this to be of minor importance.
  • Metal-semiconductor contacts are a pillar of modern semiconductor technology. Historically, their microscopic understanding has been hampered by the inability of traditional analytical and numerical methods to fully capture the complex physics governing their operating principles. Here we introduce an atomistic approach based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function, which includes all the relevant ingredients required to model realistic metal-semiconductor interfaces and allows for a direct comparison between theory and experiments via I-V bias curves simulations. We apply this method to characterize an Ag/Si interface relevant for photovoltaic applications and study the rectifying-to-Ohmic transition as function of the semiconductor doping.We also demonstrate that the standard "Activation Energy" method for the analysis of I-V bias data might be inaccurate for non-ideal interfaces as it neglects electron tunneling, and that finite-size atomistic models have problems in describing these interfaces in the presence of doping, due to a poor representation of space-charge effects. Conversely, the present method deals effectively with both issues, thus representing a valid alternative to conventional procedures for the accurate characterization of metal-semiconductor interfaces.
  • We present density functional theory calculations of the phonon-limited mobility in n-type monolayer graphene, silicene and MoS$_2$. The material properties, including the electron-phonon interaction, are calculated from first-principles. We provide a detailed description of the normalized full-band relaxation time approximation for the linearized Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) that includes inelastic scattering processes. The bulk electron-phonon coupling is evaluated by a supercell method. The method employed is fully numerical and does therefore not require a semi-analytic treatment of part of the problem and, importantly, it keeps the anisotropy information stored in the coupling as well as the band structure. In addition, we perform calculations of the low-field mobility and its dependence on carrier density and temperature to obtain a better understanding of transport in graphene, silicene and monolayer MoS$_2$. Unlike graphene, the carriers in silicene show strong interaction with the out-of-plane modes. We find that graphene has more than an order of magnitude higher mobility compared to silicene. For MoS$_2$, we obtain several orders of magnitude lower mobilities in agreement with other recent theoretical results. The simulations illustrate the predictive capabilities of the newly implemented BTE solver applied in simulation tools based on first-principles and localized basis sets.
  • We predict that unpolarized charge current injected into a ballistic thin film of prototypical topological insulator (TI) Bi$_2$Se$_3$ will generate a {\it noncollinear spin texture} $\mathbf{S}(\mathbf{r})$ on its surface. Furthermore, the nonequilibrium spin texture will extend into $\simeq 2$ nm thick layer below the TI surfaces due to penetration of evanescent wavefunctions from the metallic surfaces into the bulk of TI. Averaging $\mathbf{S}(\mathbf{r})$ over few \AA{} along the longitudinal direction defined by the current flow reveals large component pointing in the transverse direction. In addition, we find an order of magnitude smaller out-of-plane component when the direction of injected current with respect to Bi and Se atoms probes the largest hexagonal warping of the Dirac-cone dispersion on TI surface. Our analysis is based on an extension of the nonequilibrium Green functions combined with density functional theory (NEGF+DFT) to situations involving noncollinear spins and spin-orbit coupling. We also demonstrate how DFT calculations with properly optimized local orbital basis set can precisely match putatively more accurate calculations with plane-wave basis set for the supercell of Bi$_2$Se$_3$.
  • A method is presented for generating a good initial guess of a transition path between given initial and final states of a system without evaluation of the energy. An objective function surface is constructed using an interpolation of pairwise distances at each discretization point along the path and the nudged elastic band method then used to find an optimal path on this image dependent pair potential (IDPP) surface. This provides an initial path for the more computationally intensive calculations of the true minimum energy path using some method of choice for evaluating the energy and atomic forces, for example by ab initio or density functional theory. The optimal path on the IDPP surface is significantly closer to the true minimum energy path than a linear interpolation of the Cartesian coordinates and, therefore, reduces the number of iterations needed to reach convergence and averts divergence in the electronic structure calculations when atoms are brought too close to each other in the initial path. The method is illustrated with three examples: (1) rotation of a methyl group in an ethane molecule, (2) an exchange of atoms in an island on a crystal surface, and (3) an exchange of two Si-atoms in amorphous silicon. In all three cases, the computational effort in finding the minimum energy path with DFT was reduced by a factor ranging from 50 % to an order of magnitude by using an IDPP path as the initial path. The time required for parallel computations was reduced even more because of load imbalance when linear interpolation of Cartesian coordinates was used.
  • We investigate the atomic and electronic structure of a single layer of pentacene on the Au(111) surface using density functional theory. To find the candidate structures we strain match the pentacene crystal geometry with the Au(111) surface, in this way we find pentacene overlayer structures with a low strain. We show that the geometries obtained with this approach has lower energy than previous proposed surface geometries of pentacene on Au(111). We also show that the geometry and workfunction of the obtained structures are in excellent agreement with experimental data.
  • We simulate the electron transport across the Au(111)-pentacene interface using non-equilibrium Green's functions and density-functional theory (NEGF-DFT), and calculate the bias-dependent electron transmission. We find that the electrical contact resistance is dominated by the formation of a Schottky barrier at the interface, and show that the conventional semiconductor transport models across Schottky barriers need to be modified in order to describe the simulation data. We present an extension of the conventional Schottky barrier transport model, which can describe our simulation results and rationalize recent experimental data.
  • We perform first-principles calculations of electron transport across a nickel-graphene interface. Four different geometries are considered, where the contact area, graphene and nickel surface orientations and the passivation of the terminating graphene edge are varied. We find covalent bond formation between the graphene layer and the nickel surface, in agreement with other theoretical studies. We calculate the energy-dependent electron transmission for the four systems and find that the systems have very similar edge contact resistance, independent of the contact area between nickel and graphene, and in excellent agreement with recent experimental data. A simple model where graphene is bonded with a metal surface shows that the results are generic for covalently bonded graphene, and the minimum attainable edge contact resistance is twice the ideal edge quantum contact resistance of graphene.
  • We present a first-principles method for calculating the charging energy of a molecular single-electron transistor operating in the Coulomb blockade regime. The properties of the molecule are modeled using density-functional theory, the environment is described by a continuum model, and the interaction between the molecule and the environment are included through the Poisson equation. The model is used to calculate the charge stability diagrams of a benzene and C$_{60}$ molecular single-electron transistor.
  • We present a new semi-empirical model for calculating electron transport in atomic-scale devices. The model is an extension of the Extended H\"uckel method with a self-consistent Hartree potential. This potential models the effect of an external bias and corresponding charge re-arrangements in the device. It is also possible to include the effect of external gate potentials and continuum dielectric regions in the device. The model is used to study the electron transport through an organic molecule between gold surfaces, and it is demonstrated that the results are in closer agreement with experiments than ab initio approaches provide. In another example, we study the transition from tunneling to thermionic emission in a transistor structure based on graphene nanoribbons.
  • The Wave Function Matching (WFM) technique has recently been developed for the calculation of electronic transport in quantum two-probe systems. In terms of efficiency it is comparable with the widely used Green's function approach. The WFM formalism presented so far requires the evaluation of all the propagating and evanescent bulk modes of the left and right electrodes in order to obtain the correct coupling between device and electrode regions. In this paper we will describe a modified WFM approach that allows for the exclusion of the vast majority of the evanescent modes in all parts of the calculation. This approach makes it feasible to apply iterative techniques to efficiently determine the few required bulk modes, which allows for a significant reduction of the computational expense of the WFM method. We illustrate the efficiency of the method on a carbon nanotube field-effect-transistor (FET) device displaying band-to-band tunneling and modeled within the semi-empirical Extended H\"uckel theory (EHT) framework.
  • We present an ab initio study of spin dependent transport in armchair carbon nanotubes with transition metal adsorbates, iron or vanadium. We neglect the effect of tube curvature and model the nanotube by graphene with periodic boundary conditions. A density functional theory based nonequilibrium Green's function method is used to compute the electronic structure and zero-bias conductance. The presence of the adsorbate causes a strong scattering of electrons of one spin type only. The scattering is shown to be due to coupling of the two armchair band states to the metal 3d orbitals with matching symmetry causing Fano resonances appearing as dips in the transmission function. The spin type (majority/minority) being scattered depends on the adsorbate and is explained in terms of d-state filling. The results are qualitatively reproduced using a simple tight-binding model, which is then used to investigate the dependence of the transmission on the nanotube width. We find a decrease in the width of the transmission dip as the tube-size increases.
  • We address the microscopic origin of the current-induced forces by analyzing results of first principles density functional calculations of atomic gold wires connected to two gold electrodes with different electrochemical potentials. We find that current induced forces are closely related to the chemical bonding, and arise from the rearrangement of bond charge due to the current flow. We explain the current induced bond weakening/strengthening by introducing bond charges decomposed into electrode components.
  • We report first-principles studies of electronic transport in monolayers of Tour wires functionalized with different side groups. An analysis of the scattering states and transmission eigenchannels suggests that the functionalization does not strongly affect the resonances responsible for current flow through the monolayer. However, functionalization has a significant effect on the interactions within the monolayer, so that monolayers with NO$_2$ side groups exhibit local minima associated with twisted conformations of the molecules. We use our results to interpret observations of negative differential resistance and molecular memory in monolayers of NO$_2$ functionalized molecules in terms of a twisting of the central ring induced by an applied bias potential.
  • We describe an ab initio method for calculating the electronic structure, electronic transport, and forces acting on the atoms, for atomic scale systems connected to semi-infinite electrodes and with an applied voltage bias. Our method is based on the density functional theory (DFT) as implemented in the well tested Siesta approach (which uses non-local norm-conserving pseudopotentials to describe the effect of the core electrons, and linear combination of finite-range numerical atomic orbitals to describe the valence states). We fully deal with the atomistic structure of the whole system, treating both the contact and the electrodes on the same footing. The effect of the finite bias (including selfconsistency and the solution of the electrostatic problem) is taken into account using nonequilibrium Green's functions. We relate the nonequilibrium Green's function expressions to the more transparent scheme involving the scattering states. As an illustration, the method is applied to three systems where we are able to compare our results to earlier ab initio DFT calculations or experiments, and we point out differences between this method and existing schemes. The systems considered are: (1) single atom carbon wires connected to aluminum electrodes with extended or finite cross section, (2) single atom gold wires, and finally (3) large carbon nanotube systems with point defects.
  • We present a high voltage extension of the Tersoff-Hamann theory of STM images, which includes the effect of the electric field between the tip and the sample. The theoretical model is based on first principles electronic structure calculations and has no adjustable parameters. We use the method to calculate theoretical STM images of the monohydrate Si(100)-H(2$\times$1) surface with missing hydrogen defects at $- 2$~V and find an enhanced corrugation due to the electric field, in good agreement with experimental images.