• We present a brief overview of a splinter session on M dwarf stars as planet hosts that was organized as part of the Cool Stars 17 conference. The session was devoted to reviewing our current knowledge of M dwarf stars and exoplanets in order to prepare for current and future exoplanet searches focusing in low mass stars. We review the observational and theoretical challenges to characterize M dwarf stars and the importance of accurate fundamental parameters for the proper characterization of their exoplanets and our understanding on planet formation.
  • Several transiting super-Earths are expected to be discovered in the coming few years. While tools to model the interior structure of transiting planets exist, inferences about the composition are fraught with ambiguities. We present a framework to quantify how much we can robustly infer about super-Earth and Neptune-size exoplanet interiors from radius and mass measurements. We introduce quaternary diagrams to illustrate the range of possible interior compositions for planets with four layers (iron core, silicate mantles, water layers, and H/He envelopes). We apply our model to CoRoT-7b, GJ 436b, and HAT-P-11b. Interpretation of planets with H/He envelopes is limited by the model uncertainty in the interior temperature, while for CoRoT-7b observational uncertainties dominate. We further find that our planet interior model sharpens the observational constraints on CoRoT-7b's mass and radius, assuming the planet does not contain significant amounts of water or gas. We show that the strength of the limits that can be placed on a super-Earth's composition depends on the planet's density; for similar observational uncertainties, high-density super-Mercuries allow the tightest composition constraints. Finally, we describe how techniques from Bayesian statistics can be used to take into account in a formal way the combined contributions of both theoretical and observational uncertainties to ambiguities in a planet's interior composition. On the whole, with only a mass and radius measurement an exact interior composition cannot be inferred for an exoplanet because the problem is highly underconstrained. Detailed quantitative ranges of plausible compositions, however, can be found.
  • We present an analysis of the bulk composition of the MEarth transiting super Earth exoplanet GJ 1214b using planet interior structure models. We consider three possible origins for the gas layer on GJ 1214b: direct accretion of gas from the protoplanetary nebula, sublimation of ices, and outgassing from rocky material. Armed only with measurements of the planet mass (M_p=6.55+/-0.98 M_{earth}), radius (R_p=2.678+/-0.13 R_{earth}), and stellar irradiation level, our main conclusion is that we cannot infer a unique composition. A diverse range of planet interiors fits the measured planet properties. Nonetheless, GJ 1214b's relatively low average density (rho_p=1870+/-400 kg m^{-3}) means that it almost certainly has a significant gas component. Our second major conclusion is that under most conditions we consider GJ 1214b would not have liquid water. Even if the outer envelope is predominantly sublimated water ice, the envelope will likely consist of a super-fluid layer sandwiched between vapor above and plasma (electrically conductive fluid) below at greater depths. In our models, a low intrinsic planet luminosity (<~2TW) is needed for a water envelope on GJ 1214b to pass through the liquid phase.