• We analyze GRB 151027A within the binary-driven hypernova (BdHN) approach, with progenitor a carbon-oxygen core on the verge of a supernova (SN) explosion and a binary companion neutron star (NS). The hypercritical accretion of the SN ejecta onto the NS leads to its gravitational collapse into a black hole (BH), to the emission of the GRB and to a copious $e^+e^-$ plasma. The impact of this $e^+e^-$ plasma on the SN ejecta explains the properties of \textit{\textbf{all}} early SXF observed in long GRBs. We here apply this approach to the UPE and to the HXFs. We use GRB 151027A as a prototype. From the time-integrated and the time-resolved analysis we identify a double component in the UPE and confirm its ultra-relativistic nature. We confirm the mildly-relativistic nature of the SXF, of the HXF and of the ETE. By a relativistic analysis, we show that the ETE identifies the transition from a SN to the HN. We then address the theoretical justification of these observations by integrating the hydrodynamical propagation equations of the $e^+ e^-$ into the SN ejecta, the latter independently obtained from 3D smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics simulations. We conclude that the UPE, the HXF and the SXF do not form a causally connected sequence. They are the manifestation of \textbf{the same} physical process of the BH formation as seen through different viewing angles, implied by the morphology and the $\sim 300$~s rotation period of the HN ejecta.
  • On the ground of the large number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with cosmological redshift, we classified GRBs in seven subclasses, all with binary progenitors originating gravitational waves (GWs). Each binary is composed by combinations of carbon-oxygen cores (CO$_{\rm core}$), neutron stars (NSs), black holes (BHs) and white dwarfs (WDs). The long bursts, traditionally assumed to originate from a BH with an ultra-relativistic jetted emission, not emitting GWs, have been subclassified as (I) X-ray flashes (XRFs), (II) binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe), and (III) BH-supernovae (BH-SNe). They are framed within the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm with progenitor a CO$_{\rm core}$-NS/BH binary. The supernova (SN) explosion of the CO$_{\rm core}$ triggers an accretion process onto the NS/BH. If the accretion does not lead the NS to its critical mass, an XRF occurs, while when the BH is present or formed by accretion, a BdHN occurs. When the binaries are not disrupted, XRFs lead to NS-NS and BdHNe lead to NS-BH. The short bursts, originating in NS-NS, are subclassified as (IV) short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs) and (V) short GRBs (S-GRBs), the latter when a BH is formed. There are (VI) ultra-short GRBs (U-GRBs) and (VII) gamma-ray flashes (GRFs), respectively formed in NS-BH and NS-WD. We use the occurrence rate and GW emission of these subclasses to assess their detectability by Advanced LIGO-Virgo, eLISA, and resonant bars. We discuss the consequences of our results in view of the announcement of the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration of the source GW 170817 as being originated by a NS-NS.
  • The evolution of the remnant of the merger of two white dwarfs is still an open problem. Furthermore, few studies have addressed the case in which the remnant is a magnetic white dwarf with a mass larger than the Chandrasekhar limiting mass. Angular momentum losses might bring the remnant of the merger to the physical conditions suitable for developing a thermonuclear explosion. Alternatively, the remnant may be prone to gravitational or rotational instabilities, depending on the initial conditions reached after the coalescence. Dipole magnetic braking is one of the mechanisms that can drive such losses of angular momentum. However, the timescale on which these losses occur depend on several parameters, like the strength of the magnetic field. In addition, the coalescence leaves a surrounding Keplerian disk that can be accreted by the newly formed white dwarf. Here we compute the post-merger evolution of a super-Chandrasekhar magnetized white dwarf taking into account all the relevant physical processes. These include magnetic torques acting on the star, accretion from the Keplerian disk, the threading of the magnetic field lines through the disk, as well as the thermal evolution of the white dwarf core. We find that the central remnant can reach the conditions suitable to develop a thermonuclear explosion before other instabilities (such as the inverse beta-decay instability or the secular axisymmetric instability) are reached, which would instead lead to gravitational collapse of the magnetized remnant.
  • We address the significance of the observed GeV emission from \textit{Fermi}-LAT on the understanding of the structure of long GRBs. We examine 82 X-ray Flashs (XRFs), in none of them GeV radiation is observed, adding evidence to the absence of a black hole (BH) formation in their merging process. By examining $329$ Binary-driven Hypernovae (BdHNe) we find that out of $48$ BdHNe observable by \textit{Fermi}-LAT in \textit{only} $21$ of them the GeV emission is observed. The Gev emission in BdHNE follows a universal power-law relation between the luminosity and time, when measured in the rest frame of the source. The power-law index in BdHNe is of $-1.20 \pm 0.04$, very similar to the one discovered in S-GRBs, $-1.29 \pm 0.06$. The GeV emission originates from the newly-born BH and allows to determine its mass and spin. We further give the first evidence for observing a new GRB subclass originating from the merging of a hypernova (HN) and an already formed BH binary companion. We conclude that the GeV emission is a necessary and sufficient condition to confirm the presence of a BH in the hypercritical accretion process occurring in a HN. The remaining $27$ BdHNe, recently identified as sources of flaring in X-rays and soft gamma-rays, have no GeV emission. From this and previous works, we infer that the observability of the GeV emission in some BdHNe is hampered by the presence of the HN ejecta. We conclude that the GeV emission can only be detected when emitted within a half-opening angle $\approx$60$^{\circ}$ normal to the orbital plane of the BdHN.
  • We present the first three-dimensional (3D) smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) scenario of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with supernovae (SNe). We simulate the SN explosion of a carbon-oxygen core (CO$_{\rm core}$) forming a binary system with a neutron star (NS) companion. We follow the evolution of the SN ejecta, including their morphological structure, subjected to the gravitational field of both the new NS ($\nu$NS) formed at the center of the SN, and the one of the NS companion. We compute the accretion rate of the SN ejecta onto the NS companion as well as onto the $\nu$NS from SN matter fallback. We determine the fate of the binary system for a wide parameter space including different CO$_{\rm core}$ masses, orbital periods and SN explosion geometry and energies. We evaluate, for selected nuclear equations-of-state of NSs, if the accretion process leads the NSs either to the mass-shedding limit, or to the secular axisymmetric instability for gravitational collapse to a black hole (BH), or to a more massive, fast rotating, but stable NS. We also assess whether the binary keeps or not gravitationally bound after the SN explosion, hence exploring the space of binary and SN explosion parameters leading to the formation of $\nu$NS-NS or $\nu$NS-BH binaries. The consequences of our results for the modeling of GRBs via the IGC scenario are discussed.
  • We analyze the early X-ray flares in the GRB "flare-plateau-afterglow" (FPA) phase observed by Swift-XRT. The FPA occurs only in one of the seven GRB subclasses: the binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe). This subclass consists of long GRBs with a carbon-oxygen core and a neutron star (NS) binary companion as progenitors. The hypercritical accretion of the supernova (SN) ejecta onto the NS can lead to the gravitational collapse of the NS into a black hole. Consequently, one can observe a GRB emission with isotropic energy $E_{iso}\gtrsim10^{52}$~erg, as well as the associated GeV emission and the FPA phase. Previous work had shown that gamma-ray spikes in the prompt emission occur at $\sim 10^{15}$--$10^{17}$~cm with Lorentz gamma factor $\Gamma\sim10^{2}$--$10^{3}$. Using a novel data analysis we show that the time of occurrence, duration, luminosity and total energy of the X-ray flares correlate with $E_{iso}$. A crucial feature is the observation of thermal emission in the X-ray flares that we show occurs at radii $\sim10^{12}$~cm with $\Gamma\lesssim 4$. These model independent observations cannot be explained by the "fireball" model, which postulates synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation from a single ultra relativistic jetted emission extending from the prompt to the late afterglow and GeV emission phases. We show that in BdHNe a collision between the GRB and the SN ejecta occurs at $\simeq10^{10}$~cm reaching transparency at $\sim10^{12}$~cm with $\Gamma\lesssim4$. The agreement between the thermal emission observations and these theoretically derived values validates our model and opens the possibility of testing each BdHN episode with the corresponding Lorentz gamma factor.
  • Following the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ib/c supernovae, we present numerical simulations of the explosion of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core in a binary system with a neutron-star (NS) companion. The supernova ejecta trigger a \emph{hypercritical} accretion process onto the NS thanks to a copious neutrino emission and the trapping of photons within the accretion flow. We show that temperatures 1--10~MeV develop near the NS surface, hence electron-positron annihilation into neutrinos becomes the main cooling channel leading to accretion rates $10^{-9}$--$10^{-1}~M_\odot$~s$^{-1}$ and neutrino luminosities $10^{43}$--$10^{52}$~erg~s$^{-1}$ (the shorter the orbital period the higher the accretion rate). We estimate the maximum orbital period, $P_{\rm max}$, as a function of the NS initial mass, up to which the NS companion can reach by hypercritical accretion the critical mass for gravitational collapse leading to black-hole (BH) formation. We then estimate the effects of the accreting and orbiting NS companion onto a novel geometry of the supernova ejecta density profile. We present the results of a $1.4\times 10^7$~particle simulation which show that the NS induces accentuated asymmetries in the ejecta density around the orbital plane. We elaborate on the observables associated with the above features of the IGC process. We apply this framework to specific GRBs: we find that X-ray flashes (XRFs) and binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) are produced in binaries with $P>P_{\rm max}$ and $P < P_{\rm max}$, respectively. We analyze in detail the case of XRF 060218.
  • The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm explains a class of energetic, $E_{\rm iso}\gtrsim 10^{52}$~erg, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with Ic supernovae, recently named binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe). The progenitor is a tight binary system formed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron star companion. The supernova ejecta of the exploding CO core triggers a hypercritical accretion process onto the neutron star, which reaches in a few seconds the critical mass, and gravitationally collapses to a black hole emitting a GRB. In our previous simulations of this process we adopted a spherically symmetric approximation to compute the features of the hypercritical accretion process. We here present the first estimates of the angular momentum transported by the supernova ejecta, $L_{\rm acc}$, and perform numerical simulations of the angular momentum transfer to the neutron star during the hyperaccretion process in full general relativity. We show that the neutron star: i) reaches in a few seconds either mass-shedding limit or the secular axisymmetric instability depending on its initial mass; ii) reaches a maximum dimensionless angular momentum value, $[c J/(G M^2)]_{\rm max}\approx 0.7$; iii) can support less angular momentum than the one transported by supernova ejecta, $L_{\rm acc} > J_{\rm NS,max}$, hence there is an angular momentum excess which necessarily leads to jetted emission.
  • We study under what conditions the thermal peeling is present for dissipative local and quasi-local anisotropic spherical matter configurations. The thermal peeling occurs when different signs in the velocity of fluid elements appears, giving rise to the splitting of the matter configuration. The evolution is considered in the quasi-static approximation and the matter contents are radiant, anisotropic (unequal stresses) spherical local and quasi-local fluids. The heat flux and the associated temperature profiles are described by causal thermodynamics consistent with this approximation. It is found some particular, local and quasi-local equation of state for ultra-dense matter configurations exhibit thermal peeling when most of the radiated energy is concentrated at the middle of the distribution. This effect, which appears to be associated with extreme astrophysical scenarios (highly relativistic and very luminous gravitational system expelling its outer mass shells), is very sensible to energy flux profile and to the shape of the luminosity emitted by the compact object.