• The $\gamma^\ast \gamma \to \pi^0$ transition form factor, $G(Q^2)$, is computed on the entire domain of spacelike momenta using a continuum approach to the two valence-body bound-state problem in relativistic quantum field theory: the result agrees with data obtained by the CELLO, CLEO and Belle Collaborations. The analysis unifies this prediction with that of the pion's valence-quark parton distribution amplitude (PDA) and elastic electromagnetic form factor, and demonstrates, too, that a fully self-consistent treatment can readily connect a pion PDA that is a broad, concave function at the hadronic scale with the perturbative QCD prediction for the transition form factor in the hard photon limit. The normalisation of that limit is set by the scale of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, which is a crucial feature of the Standard Model. Understanding of the latter will thus remain incomplete until definitive transition form factor data is available on $Q^2>10\,$GeV$^2$.
  • Interferometers operating at or close to quantum limits of precision have found wide application in tabletop searches for physics beyond the standard model, the study of fundamental forces and symmetries of nature and foundational tests of quantum mechanics. The limits imposed by quantum fluctuations and measurement backaction on conventional interferometers ($\delta \phi \sim 1/\sqrt{N}$) have spurred the development of schemes to circumvent these limits through quantum interference, multiparticle interactions and entanglement. A prominent example of such schemes, the so-called $SU(1,1)$ interferometer, has been shown to be particularly robust against particle loss and inefficient detection, and has been demonstrated with photons and ultracold atoms. Here, we realize a $SU(1,1)$ interferometer in a fundamentally new platform in which the interfering arms are distinct flexural modes of a millimeter-scale mechanical resonator. We realize up to 15.4(3) dB of noise squeezing and demonstrate the Heisenberg scaling of interferometric sensitivity ($\delta \phi \sim 1/N$), corresponding to a 6-fold improvement in measurement precision over a conventional interferometer. Our work extends the optomechanical toolbox for the quantum manipulation of macroscopic mechanical motion and presents new avenues for studies of optomechanical sensing and the nonequilibrium dynamics of multimode optomechanical systems.
  • We sketch here an approach to the computation of generalised parton distributions (GPDs), based upon a rainbow-ladder (RL) truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations and exemplified via the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD, $H_\pi^{\rm v}(x,\xi,t)$. Our analysis focuses on the case of zero skewness, $\xi=0$, and underlines that the impulse-approximation used hitherto to define the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD is generally invalid owing to omission of contributions from the gluons which bind dressed-quarks into the pion. A simple correction enables us to identify a practicable improvement to the approximation for $H_\pi^{\rm v}(x,0,t)$, expressed as the Radon transform of a single amplitude. Therewith we obtain results for $H_\pi^{\rm v}(x,0,t)$ and the associated impact-parameter dependent distribution, $q_\pi^{\rm v}(x,|\vec{b}_\perp|)$, which provide a qualitatively sound picture of the pion's dressed-quark structure at an hadronic scale.
  • In order to learn effectively from measurements of generalised parton distributions (GPDs), it is desirable to compute them using a framework that can potentially connect empirical information with basic features of the Standard Model. We sketch an approach to such computations, based upon a rainbow-ladder (RL) truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations and exemplified via the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD, $H_\pi^{\rm v}(x,\xi,t)$. Our analysis focuses primarily on $\xi=0$, although we also capitalise on the symmetry-preserving nature of the RL truncation by connecting $H_\pi^{\rm v}(x,\xi=\pm 1,t)$ with the pion's valence-quark parton distribution amplitude. We explain that the impulse-approximation used hitherto to define the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD is generally invalid owing to omission of contributions from the gluons which bind dressed-quarks into the pion. A simple correction enables us to identify a practicable improvement to the approximation for $H_\pi^{\rm v}(x,0,t)$, expressed as the Radon transform of a single amplitude. Therewith we obtain results for $H_\pi^{\rm v}(x,0,t)$ and the associated impact-parameter dependent distribution, $q_\pi^{\rm v}(x,|\vec{b}_\perp|)$, which provide a qualitatively sound picture of the pion's dressed-quark structure at an hadronic scale. We evolve the distributions to a scale $\zeta=2\,$GeV, so as to facilitate comparisons in future with results from experiment or other nonperturbative methods.
  • We realize a nondegenerate parametric amplifier in an ultrahigh $Q$ mechanical membrane resonator and demonstrate two-mode thermomechanical noise squeezing. Our measurements are accurately described by a two-mode model that attributes this nonlinear mechanical interaction to a substrate-mediated process which is dramatically enhanced by the quality factors of the individual modes. This realization of strong multimode nonlinearities in a mechanical platform compatible with quantum-limited optical detection and cooling makes this a powerful system for nonlinear approaches to quantum metrology, transduction between optical and phononic fields and the quantum manipulation of phononic degrees of freedom.
  • We present multiwavelength observations of the afterglow of GRB 130427A, the brightest (in total fluence) gamma-ray burst of the past 29 years. Optical spectroscopy from Gemini-North reveals the redshift of the GRB to be z=0.340, indicating that its unprecedented brightness is primarily the result of its relatively close proximity to Earth; the intrinsic luminosities of both the GRB and its afterglow are not extreme in comparison to other bright GRBs. We present a large suite of multiwavelength observations spanning from 300 s to 130 d after the burst and demonstrate that the afterglow shows relatively simple, smooth evolution at all frequencies with no significant late-time flaring or rebrightening activity. The entire dataset from 1 GHz to 10 GeV can be modeled as synchrotron emission from a combination of reverse and forward shocks in good agreement with the standard afterglow model, providing strong support to the applicability of the underlying theory and clarifying the nature of the GeV emission observed to last for minutes to hours following other very bright GRBs. A tenuous, wind-stratified circumburst density profile is required by the observations, suggesting a massive-star progenitor with a low mass-loss rate, perhaps due to low metallicity. GRBs similar in nature to GRB 130427A, inhabiting low-density media and exhibiting strong reverse shocks, are probably not uncommon but may have been difficult to recognize in the past due to their relatively faint late-time radio emission; more such events should be found in abundance by the new generation of sensitive radio and millimeter instruments.
  • We study the optomechanical properties of stoichiometric SiN resonators through a combination of spectroscopic and interferometric imaging techniques. At room temperature, we demonstrate ultrahigh quality factors of $5 \times 10^7$ and a $f \times Q$ product of $1 \times 10^{14}$ Hz that, to our knowledge, correspond to the largest values yet reported for mesoscopic flexural resonators. Through a comprehensive study of the limiting dissipation mechanisms as a function of resonator and substrate geometry, we identify radiation loss through the supporting substrate as the dominant loss process. In addition to pointing the way towards higher quality factors through optimized substrate designs, our work realizes an enabling platform for the observation and control of quantum behavior in a macroscopic mechanical system coupled to a room temperature bath.
  • A novel method is employed to compute the pion electromagnetic form factor, F_\pi(Q^2), on the entire domain of spacelike momentum transfer using the Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) framework in quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The DSE architecture unifies this prediction with that of the pion's valence-quark parton distribution amplitude (PDA). Using this PDA, the leading-order, leading-twist perturbative QCD result for Q^2 F_\pi(Q^2) underestimates the full computation by just 15% on Q^2>~8GeV^2, in stark contrast with the result obtained using the asymptotic PDA. The analysis shows that hard contributions to the pion form factor dominate for Q^2>~8GeV^2 but, even so, the magnitude of Q^2 F_\pi(Q^2) reflects the scale of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, a pivotal emergent phenomenon in the Standard Model.
  • A method is explained through which a pointwise accurate approximation to the pion's valence-quark distribution amplitude (PDA) may be obtained from a limited number of moments. In connection with the single nontrivial moment accessible in contemporary simulations of lattice-regularised quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the method yields a PDA that is a broad concave function whose pointwise form agrees with that predicted by Dyson-Schwinger equation analyses of the pion. Under leading-order evolution, the PDA remains broad to energy scales in excess of 100 GeV, a feature which signals persistence of the influence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. Consequently, the asymptotic distribution, \phi_\pi^asy(x), is a poor approximation to the pion's PDA at all such scales that are either currently accessible or foreseeable in experiments on pion elastic and transition form factors. Thus, related expectations based on \phi_\pi^asy(x) should be revised.
  • Studies of the structure of excited baryons are key to the N* program at Jefferson Lab. Within the first year of data taking with the Hall B CLAS12 detector following the 12 GeV upgrade, a dedicated experiment will aim to extract the N* electrocouplings at high photon virtualities Q2. This experiment will allow exploration of the structure of N* resonances at the highest photon virtualities ever yet achieved, with a kinematic reach up to Q2 = 12 GeV2. This high-Q2 reach will make it possible to probe the excited nucleon structures at distance scales ranging from where effective degrees of freedom, such as constituent quarks, are dominant through the transition to where nearly massless bare-quark degrees of freedom are relevant. In this document, we present a detailed description of the physics that can be addressed through N* structure studies in exclusive meson electroproduction. The discussion includes recent advances in reaction theory for extracting N* electrocouplings from meson electroproduction off protons, along with QCD-based approaches to the theoretical interpretation of these fundamental quantities. This program will afford access to the dynamics of the non-perturbative strong interaction responsible for resonance formation, and will be crucial in understanding the nature of confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in baryons, and how excited nucleons emerge from QCD.
  • A radio frequency (RF) field solver based on Maxwell's equations and a cold plasma dielectric tensor is em- ployed to describe wave phenomena observed in a cylindrical non-uniform helicon discharge. The experiment is carried out on a recently built linear plasma-material interaction machine: the MAGnetized Plasma In- teraction Experiment (MAGPIE) [B. D. Blackwell, J. F. Caneses, C. Samuell, J. Wach, J. Howard, and C. S. Corr, submitted on 25 March 2012 to Plasma Sources Science and Technology], in which both plasma density and static magnetic field are functions of axial position. The field strength increases by a factor of 15 from source to target plate, and plasma density and electron temperature are radially non-uniform. With an enhancement factor of 9.5 to the electron-ion Coulomb collision frequency, 12% reduction in the antenna radius, and the same other conditions as employed in the experiment, the solver produces axial and radial profiles of wave amplitude and phase that are consistent with measurements. Ion-acoustic turbulence, which can happen if electron drift velocity exceeds the speed of sound in magnetized plasmas, may account for the factor of 9.5 used to match simulated results with experimental data. To overcome the single m vacuum solu- tion limitations of the RF solver, which can only compute the glass response to the same mode number of the antenna, we have adjusted the antenna radius to match the wave field strength in the plasma.(not finished because of the limited number of characters, please see the full paper)
  • We compute nucleon and Roper e.m. elastic and transition form factors using a symmetry-preserving treatment of a contact-interaction. Obtained thereby, the e.m. interactions of baryons are typically described by hard form factors. In contrasting this behaviour with that produced by a momentum-dependent interaction, one achieves comparisons which highlight that elastic scattering and resonance electroproduction experiments probe the infrared evolution of QCD's running masses; e.g., the existence, and location if so, of a zero in the ratio of nucleon Sachs form factors are strongly influenced by the running of the dressed-quark mass. In our description of baryons, diquark correlations are important. These correlations are instrumental in producing a zero in the Dirac form factor of the proton's d-quark; and in determining d_v/u_v(x=1), as we show via a formula that expresses d_v/u_v(x=1) in terms of the nucleon's diquark content. The contact interaction produces a first excitation of the nucleon that is constituted predominantly from axial-vector diquark correlations. This impacts greatly on the gamma*p->P_{11}(1440) form factors. Notably, our quark core contribution to F_2*(Q^2) exhibits a zero at Q^2~0.5mN^2. Faddeev equation treatments of a hadron's quark core usually underestimate its magnetic properties, hence we consider the effect produced by a dressed-quark anomalous e.m. moment. Its inclusion much improves agreement with experiment. On the domain 0<Q^2<2GeV^2, meson-cloud effects are important in making a realistic comparison between experiment and hadron structure calculations. Our computed helicity amplitudes are similar to the bare amplitudes in coupled-channels analyses of the electroproduction process. Thus supports a view that extant structure calculations should directly be compared with the bare-couplings, etc., determined via coupled-channels analyses.
  • We present a workable model for the fermion-photon vertex, which is expressed solely in terms of functions that appear in the fermion propagator and independent of the angle between the relative momenta, and does not explicitly depend on the covariant-gauge parameter. It nevertheless produces a critical coupling for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking that is practically independent of the covariant-gauge parameter and an anomalous magnetic moment distribution for the dressed fermion that agrees in important respects with realistic numerical solutions of the inhomogeneous vector Bethe-Salpeter equation.
  • The rise of graphene opens a new door to qubit implementation, as discussed in the recent proposal of valley pair qubits in double quantum dots of gapped graphene (Wu et al., arXiv: 1104.0443 [cond-mat.mes-hall]). The work here presents the comprehensive theory underlying the proposal. It discusses the interaction of electrons with external magnetic and electric fields in such structures. Specifically, it examines a strong, unique mechanism, i.e., the analogue of the 1st-order relativistic effect in gapped graphene. This mechanism is state mixing free and allows, together with the electrically tunable exchange coupling, a fast, all-electric manipulation of qubits via electric gates, in the time scale of ns. The work also looks into the issue of fault tolerance in a typical case, yielding at 10oK a long qubit coherence time (~O(ms)).
  • The nanostructural evolution of the strain-induced structural phase transition in BiFeO3 is examined. Using high-resolution X-ray diffraction and scanning-probe microscopy-based studies we have uniquely identified and examined the numerous phases present at these phase boundaries and have discovered an intermediate monoclinic phase in addition to the previously observed rhombohedral- and tetragonal-like phases. Further analysis has determined that the so-called mixed-phase regions of these films are not mixtures of rhombohedral- and tetragonal-like phases, but intimate mixtures of highly-distorted monoclinic phases with no evidence for the presence of the rhombohedral-like parent phase. Finally, we propose a mechanism for the enhanced electromechanical response in these films including how these phases interact at the nanoscale to produce large surface strains.
  • At the center of quantum computing1 realization is the physical implementation of qubits - two-state quantum information units. The rise of graphene2 has opened a new door to the implementation. Because graphene electrons simulate two-dimensional relativistic particles with two degenerate and independent energy valleys,3 a novel degree of freedom (d.o.f.), namely, the valley state of an electron, emerges as a new information carrier.4 Here, we expand the Loss-DiVincenzo quantum dot (QD) approach in electron spin qubits,5,6 and investigate the feasibility of double QD (DQD) structures in gapful graphene as "valley qubits", with the logic 0 / 1 states represented by the "valley" singlet / triplet pair. This generalization is characterized by 1) valley relaxation time ~ O(ms), and 2) electric qubit manipulation on the time scale ~ ns, based on the 1st-order "relativistic effect" unique in graphene. A potential for valley-based quantum computing is present.
  • We present the first Dyson-Schwinger equation calculation of the light hadron spectrum that simultaneously correlates the masses of meson and baryon ground- and excited-states within a single framework. At the core of our analysis is a symmetry-preserving treatment of a vector-vector contact interaction. In comparison with relevant quantities the root-mean-square-relative-error/degree-of freedom is 13%. Notable amongst our results is agreement between the computed baryon masses and the bare masses employed in modern dynamical coupled-channels models of pion-nucleon reactions. Our analysis provides insight into numerous aspects of baryon structure; e.g., relationships between the nucleon and Delta masses and those of the dressed-quark and diquark correlations they contain.
  • A two-fluid model developed originally to describe wave oscillations in the vacuum arc centrifuge, a cylindrical, rapidly rotating, low temperature and confined plasma column, is applied to interpret plasma oscillations in a RF generated linear magnetised plasma (WOMBAT), with similar density and field strength. Compared to typical centrifuge plasmas, WOMBAT plasmas have slower normalised rotation frequency, lower temperature and lower axial velocity. Despite these differences, the two-fluid model provides a consistent description of the WOMBAT plasma configuration and yields qualitative agreement between measured and predicted wave oscillation frequencies with axial field strength. In addition, the radial profile of the density perturbation predicted by this model is consistent with the data. Parameter scans show that the dispersion curve is sensitive to the axial field strength and the electron temperature, and the dependence of oscillation frequency with electron temperature matches the experiment. These results consolidate earlier claims that the density and floating potential oscillations are a resistive drift mode, driven by the density gradient. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed physics model of flowing plasmas in the diffusion region away from the RF source. Possible extensions to the model, including temperature non-uniformity and magnetic field oscillations, are also discussed.
  • We provide a glimpse of recent progress in hadron physics made using QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations, reviewing: the notion of in-hadron condensates and a putative solution of a gross problem with the cosmological constant; the dynamical generation of quark anomalous chromo- and electro-magnetic moments, and their material impact upon the proton's electric/magnetic form factor ratio; a computation that simultaneously correlates the masses of meson and baryon ground- and excited-states; and a prediction for the x->1 value of the ratio of neutron/proton distribution functions.
  • The immense volume of data generated by the suite of instruments on SDO requires new tools for efficient identifying and accessing data that is most relevant to research investigations. We have developed the Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase (HEK) to fill this need. The HEK system combines automated data mining using feature-detection methods and high-performance visualization systems for data markup. In addition, web services and clients are provided for searching the resulting metadata, reviewing results, and efficiently accessing the data. We review these components and present examples of their use with SDO data.
  • We provide a glimpse of recent progress in meson physics made via QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations with: a perspective on confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB); a pre'cis on the physics of in-hadron condensates; results for the masses of the \pi, \sigma, \rho, a_1 mesons and their first-radial excitations; and an illustration of the impact of DCSB on the pion form factor.
  • This snapshot of recent progress in hadron physics made in connection with QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations includes: a perspective on confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB); a pre'cis on the physics of in-hadron condensates; results on the hadron spectrum, including dressed-quark-core masses for the nucleon and Delta, their first radial excitations, and the parity-partners of these states; an illustration of the impact of DCSB on the electromagnetic pion form factor, thereby exemplifying how data can be used to chart the momentum-dependence of the dressed-quark mass function; and a prediction that F_1^{p,d}/F_1^{p,u} passes through zero at Q^2\approx 5m_N^2 owing to the presence of nonpointlike scalar and axial-vector diquark correlations in the nucleon.