• We here apply a novel technique selecting quasar candidates purely as sources with zero proper motions in the Gaia data release 2 (DR2). We demonstrate that this approach is highly efficient toward high Galactic latitudes with < 25% contamination from stellar sources. Such a selection technique offers a very pure sample completeness, since all cosmological point sources are selected regardless of their intrinsic spectral properties within the limiting magnitude of Gaia. We carry out a pilot-study by defining a sample compiled by including all Gaia-DR2 sources within one degree of the North Galactic Pole (NGP) selected to have proper motions consistent with zero within 2-sigma uncertainty. By cross-matching the sample to the optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the mid-infrared AllWISE photometric catalogues we investigate the colours of each of our sources. Together with already spectroscopically confirmed quasars we are therefore able to determine the efficiency of our selection. The majority of the zero proper motion sources have optical to mid-infrared colours consistent with known quasars. The remaining population may be contaminating stellar sources, but some may also be quasars with colours similar to stars. Spectroscopic follow-up of the zero proper motion sources is needed to unveil such a hitherto hidden quasar population. This approach has the potential to allow substantial progress on many important questions concerning quasars such as determining the fraction of dust-obscured quasars, the fraction of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, and the metallicity distribution of damped Lyman-$\alpha$ absorbers. The technique could also potentially reveal new types of quasars or even new classes of cosmological point sources.
  • The cosmic chemical enrichment as measured from damped Ly$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs) will be underestimated if dusty and metal-rich absorbers have evaded identification. Here we report the discovery and present the spectroscopic observations of a quasar, KV-RQ\,1500-0031, at $z=2.520$ reddened by a likely dusty DLA at $z=2.428$ and a strong MgII absorber at $z=1.603$. This quasar was identified as part of the KiDS-VIKING Red Quasar (KV-RQ) survey, specifically aimed at targeting dusty absorbers which may cause the background quasars to escape the optical selection of e.g. the SDSS quasar survey. For the DLA we find an HI column density of $\log N$(HI) = $21.2\pm 0.1$ and a metallicity of [X/H] = $-0.90\pm 0.20$ derived from an empirical relation based on the equivalent width of SiII$\lambda$1526. We observe a total visual extinction of $A_V=0.16$ mag induced by both absorbers. We compile a sample of 17 additional dusty ($A_V > 0.1$ mag) DLAs toward quasars (QSO-DLAs) from the literature for which we characterize the properties of HI column density, metallicity and dust. From this sample we also estimate a correction factor to the overall DLA metallicity budget. We demonstrate that the dusty QSO-DLAs have high metal column densities ($\log N$(HI) + [X/H]) and are more similar to gamma-ray burst (GRB)-selected DLAs (GRB-DLAs) than regular QSO-DLAs. We evaluate the effect of dust reddening in DLAs as well as illustrate how the induced color excess of the underlying quasars can be significant (up to $\sim 1$ mag in various optical bands), even for low to moderate extinction values ($A_V \lesssim 0.6$ mag). Finally we discuss the direct and indirect implications of a significant dust bias in both QSO- and GRB-DLA samples. [Abridged]
  • In this work we present spectra of all $\gamma$-ray burst (GRB) afterglows that have been promptly observed with the X-shooter spectrograph until 31-03-2017. In total, we obtained spectroscopic observations of 103 individual GRBs observed within 48 hours of the GRB trigger. Redshifts have been measured for 97 per cent of these, covering a redshift range from 0.059 to 7.84. Based on a set of observational selection criteria that minimize biases with regards to intrinsic properties of the GRBs, the follow-up effort has been focused on producing a homogeneous sample of 93 afterglow spectra for GRBs discovered by the Swift satellite. We here provide a public release of all the reduced spectra, including continuum estimates and telluric absorption corrections. For completeness, we also provide reductions for the 18 late-time observations of the underlying host galaxies. We provide an assessment of the degree of completeness with respect to the parent GRB population, in terms of the X-ray properties of the bursts in the sample and find that the sample presented here is representative of the full Swift sample. We constrain the fraction of dark bursts to be < 28 per cent and we confirm previous results that higher optical darkness is correlated with increased X-ray absorption. For the 42 bursts for which it is possible, we provide a measurement of the neutral hydrogen column density, increasing the total number of published HI column density measurements by $\sim$ 33 per cent. This dataset provides a unique resource to study the ISM across cosmic time, from the local progenitor surroundings to the intervening universe.
  • The SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES (SUSHIES) survey aims to provide strong new constraints on the progenitors of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) by understanding the relationship to their host galaxies. We present the photometric properties of 53 H-poor and 16 H-rich SLSN host galaxies out to $z\sim4$. We model their spectral energy distributions to derive physical properties, which we compare with other galaxy populations. At low redshift, H-poor SLSNe are preferentially found in very blue, low-mass galaxies with high average specific star-formation rates. As redshift increases, the host population follows the general evolution of star-forming galaxies towards more luminous galaxies. After accounting for secular evolution, we find evidence for differential evolution in galaxy mass, but not in the $B$-band and the far UV luminosity ($3\sigma$ confidence). Most remarkable is the scarcity of hosts with stellar masses above $10^{10}~M_\odot$ for both classes of SLSNe. In the case of H-poor SLSNe, we attribute this to a stifled production efficiency above $\sim0.4$ solar metallicity. However, we argue that, in addition to low metallicity, a short-lived stellar population is also required to regulate the SLSN production. H-rich SLSNe are found in a very diverse population of star-forming galaxies. Still, the scarcity of massive hosts suggests a stifled production efficiency above $\sim0.8$ solar metallicity. The large dispersion of the H-rich SLSNe host properties is in stark contrast to those of gamma-ray burst, regular core-collapse SN, and H-poor SLSNe host galaxies. We propose that multiple progenitor channels give rise to this sub-class.
  • We present a comprehensive study of the relations between gas kinematics, metallicity, and stellar mass in a sample of 82 GRB-selected galaxies using absorption and emission methods. We find the velocity widths of both emission and absorption profiles to be a proxy of stellar mass. We also investigate the velocity-metallicity correlation and its evolution with redshift and find the correlation derived from emission lines to have a significantly smaller scatter compared to that found using absorption lines. Using 33 GRB hosts with measured stellar mass and metallicitiy, we study the mass-metallicity relation for GRB host galaxies in a stellar mass range of $10^{8.2} M_{\odot}$ to $10^{11.1} M_{\odot}$ and a redshift range of $ z\sim 0.3-3.4$. The GRB-selected galaxies appear to track the mass-metallicity relation of star forming galaxies but with an offset of 0.15 towards lower metallicities. This offset is comparable with the average error-bar on the metallicity measurements of the GRB sample and also the scatter on the MZ relation of the general population. It is hard to decide whether this relatively small offset is due to systematic effects or the intrinsic nature of GRB hosts. We also investigate the possibility of using absorption-line metallicity measurements of GRB hosts to study the mass-metallicity relation at high redshifts. Our analysis shows that the metallicity measurements from absorption methods can significantly differ from emission metallicities and assuming identical measurements from the two methods may result in erroneous conclusions.
  • Previous studies have shown that the incidence rate of intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs were a factor of 2 - 4 higher than towards quasars. Exploring the similar sized and uniformly selected legacy data sets XQ-100 and XSGRB, each consisting of 100 quasar and 81 GRB afterglow spectra obtained with a single instrument (VLT/X-shooter), we demonstrate that there is no disagreement in the number density of strong MgII absorbers with rest-frame equivalent widths $W_r^{2796} >$ 1 {\AA} towards GRBs and quasars in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 5. With large and similar sample sizes, and path length coverages of $\Delta$z = 57.8 and 254.4 for GRBs and quasars, respectively, the incidences of intervening absorbers are consistent within 1 sigma uncertainty levels at all redshifts. For absorbers at z < 2.3 the incidence towards GRBs is a factor of 1.5$\pm$0.4 higher than the expected number of strong MgII absorbers in SDSS quasar spectra, while for quasar absorbers observed with X-shooter we find an excess factor of 1.4$\pm$0.2 relative to SDSS quasars. Conversely, the incidence rates agree at all redshifts with reported high spectral resolution quasar data, and no excess is found. The only remaining discrepancy in incidences is between SDSS MgII catalogues and high spectral resolution studies. The rest-frame equivalent width distribution also agrees to within 1 sigma uncertainty levels between the GRB and quasar samples. Intervening strong MgII absorbers towards GRBs are therefore neither unusually frequent, nor unusually strong.
  • The low distance, $z=0.0591$, of GRB 100316D and its association with SN 2010bh represent two important motivations for studying this host galaxy and the GRB's immediate environment with the Integral-Field Spectrographs like VLT/MUSE. Its large field-of-view allows us to create 2D maps of gas metallicity, ionization level, and the star-formation rate distribution maps, as well as to investigate the presence of possible host companions. The host is a late-type dwarf irregular galaxy with multiple star-forming regions and an extended central region with signatures of on-going shock interactions. The GRB site is characterized by the lowest metallicity, the highest star-formation rate and the youngest ($\sim$ 20-30 Myr) stellar population in the galaxy, which suggest a GRB progenitor stellar population with masses up to 20 -- 40 $M_{\odot}$. We note that the GRB site has an offset of $\sim$660pc from the most luminous SF region in the host. The observed SF activity in this galaxy may have been triggered by a relatively recent gravitational encounter between the host and a small undetected ($L_{H\alpha} \leq 10^{36}$ erg/s) companion.
  • We present 1.3- and/or 3-mm continuum images and 3-mm spectral scans, obtained using NOEMA and ALMA, of 21 distant, dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). Our sample is a subset of the galaxies selected by Ivison et al. (2016) on the basis of their extremely red far-infrared (far-IR) colours and low {\it Herschel} flux densities; most are thus expected to be unlensed, extraordinarily luminous starbursts at $z \gtrsim 4$, modulo the considerable cross-section to gravitational lensing implied by their redshift. We observed 17 of these galaxies with NOEMA and four with ALMA, scanning through the 3-mm atmospheric window. We have obtained secure redshifts for seven galaxies via detection of multiple CO lines, one of them a lensed system at $z=6.027$ (two others are also found to be lensed); a single emission line was detected in another four galaxies, one of which has been shown elsewhere to lie at $z=4.002$. Where we find no spectroscopic redshifts, the galaxies are generally less luminous by 0.3-0.4 dex, which goes some way to explaining our failure to detect line emission. We show that this sample contains amongst the most luminous known star-forming galaxies. Due to their extreme star-formation activity, these galaxies will consume their molecular gas in $\lesssim 100$ Myr, despite their high molecular gas masses, and are therefore plausible progenitors of the massive, `red-and-dead' elliptical galaxies at $z \approx 3$.
  • We study the spectrophotometric properties of a highly magnified (\mu~40-70) pair of stellar systems identified at z=3.2222 behind the Hubble Frontier Field galaxy cluster MACS~J0416. Five multiple images (out of six) have been spectroscopically confirmed by means of VLT/MUSE and VLT/X-Shooter observations. Each image includes two faint (m_uv~30.6), young (<100 Myr), low-mass (<10^7 Msun), low-metallicity (12+Log(O/H)~7.7, or 1/10 solar) and compact (30 pc effective radius) stellar systems separated by ~300pc, after correcting for lensing amplification. We measured several rest-frame ultraviolet and optical narrow (\sigma_v <~ 25 km/s) high-ionization lines. These features may be the signature of very hot (T>50000 K) stars within dense stellar clusters, whose dynamical mass is likely dominated by the stellar component. Remarkably, the ultraviolet metal lines are not accompanied by Lya emission (e.g., CIV / Lya > 15), despite the fact that the Lya line flux is expected to be 150 times brighter (inferred from the Hbeta flux). A spatially-offset, strongly-magnified (\mu>50) Lya emission with a spatial extent <~7.6 kpc^2 is instead identified 2 kpc away from the system. The origin of such a faint emission can be the result of fluorescent Lya induced by a transverse leakage of ionizing radiation emerging from the stellar systems and/or can be associated to an underlying and barely detected object (with m_uv > 34 de-lensed). This is the first confirmed metal-line emitter at such low-luminosity and redshift without Lya emission, suggesting that, at least in some cases, a non-uniform covering factor of the neutral gas might hamper the Lya detection.
  • We present the spectroscopic and photometric late-time follow-up of the host galaxy of the long-duration Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 140506A at z = 0.889. The optical and near-infrared afterglow of this GRB had a peculiar spectral energy distribution (SED) with a strong flux-drop at 8000 {\AA} (4000 {\AA} rest-frame) suggesting an unusually steep extinction curve. By analyzing the contribution and physical properties of the host galaxy, we here aim at providing additional information on the properties and origin of this steep, non-standard extinction. We find that the strong flux-drop in the GRB afterglow spectrum at < 8000 {\AA} and rise at < 4000 {\AA} is well explained by the combination of a steep extinction curve along the GRB line of sight and contamination by the host galaxy light so that the scenario with an extreme 2175 {\AA} extinction bump can be excluded. We localise the GRB to be at a projected distance of approximately 4 kpc from the centre of the host galaxy. Based on emission-line diagnostics of the four detected nebular lines, Halpha, Hbeta, [O II] and [O III], we find the host to be a modestly star forming (SFR = 1.34 +/- 0.04 Msun yr^-1) and relatively metal poor (Z = 0.35^{+0.15}_{-0.11} Zsun) galaxy with a large dust content, characterized by a measured visual attenuation of A_V = 1.74 +/- 0.41 mag, thus unexceptional in all its physical properties. We model the extinction curve of the host-corrected afterglow and show that the standard dust properties causing the reddening seen in the Local Group are inadequate in describing the steep drop. We conclude that the steep extinction curve seen in the afterglow towards the GRB is of exotic origin, is sightline-dependent only and thus solely a consequence of the circumburst environment.
  • Galaxies at high redshifts provide a valuable tool to study cosmic dawn, and therefore it is crucial to reliably identify these galaxies. Here, we present an unambiguous and first simultaneous detection of both the Lyman-alpha emission and the Lyman break from a z = 7.512+/- 0.004 galaxy, observed in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with G102 grism on Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6 sigma) in multiple observational position angles (PA), with total integrated Ly{\alpha} line flux of 1.06+/- 0.12 e10-17erg s-1cm-2. The line flux is nearly a factor of four higher than the previous MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations of faint Ly{\alpha} emission at {\lambda} = 1.0347{\mu}m, yielding z = 7.5078+/- 0.0004. This is consistent with other recent observations implying that ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy underestimates total emission line fluxes, and if confirmed, can have strong implications for reionization studies that are based on ground-based Lyman-{\alpha} measurements. A 4-{\sigma} detection of the NV line in one PA also suggests a weak Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), potentially making this source the highest-redshift AGN yet found. Thus, this observation from the Hubble Space Telescope clearly demonstrates the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy to study the epoch of reionization.
  • The XQ-100 survey provides optical and near infrared coverage of 36 blindly selected, intervening damped Lyman alpha systems (DLAs) at 2 < z < 4, simultaneously covering the MgII doublet at 2796A, 2803A, and the Ly-alpha transition. Using the XQ-100 DLA sample, we investigate the completeness of selecting DLA absorbers based on their MgII rest-frame equivalent width (W2796) at these redshifts. Of the 29 DLAs with clean MgII profiles, we find that six (20% of DLAs) have W2796 < 0.6A. The DLA incidence rate of W2796 < 0.6A absorbers is a factor of ~5 higher than what is seen in z~1 samples, indicating a potential evolution in the MgII properties of DLAs with redshift. All of the W2796 < 0.6A DLAs have low metallicities (-2.5 < [M/H] < -1.7), small velocity widths (v90 < 50 km/s), and tend to have relatively low N(HI). We demonstrate that the exclusion of these low W2796 DLAs results in a higher mean N(HI) which in turn leads to a ~7% increase in the cosmological gas density of HI of DLAs at 2 < z < 4; and that this exclusion has a minimal effect on the HI-weighted mean metallicity.
  • The XQ-100 survey has provided high signal-noise spectra of 100 redshift 3-4.5 quasars with the X-Shooter spectrograph. The metal abundances for 13 elements in the 41 damped Lyman alpha systems (DLAs) identified in the XQ-100 sample are presented, and an investigation into abundances of a variety of DLA classes is conducted. The XQ-100 DLA sample contains five DLAs within 5000 km/s of their host quasar (proximate DLAs; PDLAs) as well as three sightlines which contain two DLAs within 10,000 km/s of each other along the same line-of-sight (multiple DLAs; MDLAs). Combined with previous observations in the literature, we demonstrate that PDLAs with logN(HI)<21.0 show lower [S/H] and [Fe/H] (relative to intervening systems with similar redshift and N(HI)), whilst higher [S/H] and [Si/H] are seen in PDLAs with logN(HI)>21.0. These abundance discrepancies are independent of their line-of-sight velocity separation from the host quasar, and the velocity width of the metal lines (v90). Contrary to previous studies, MDLAs show no difference in [alpha/Fe] relative to single DLAs matched in metallicity and redshift. In addition, we present follow-up UVES data of J0034+1639, a sightline containing three DLAs, including a metal-poor DLA with [Fe/H]=-2.82 (the third lowest [Fe/H] in DLAs identified to date) at z=4.25. Lastly we study the dust-corrected [Zn/Fe], emphasizing that near-IR coverage of X-Shooter provides unprecedented access to MgII, CaII and TiII lines (at redshifts 3-4) to provide additional evidence for subsolar [Zn/Fe] ratio in DLAs.
  • We describe the execution and data reduction of the European Southern Observatory Large Programme "Quasars and their absorption lines: a legacy survey of the high-redshift universe with VLT/XSHOOTER" (hereafter `XQ-100'). XQ-100 has produced and made publicly available an homogeneous and high-quality sample of echelle spectra of 100 QSOs at redshifts z~3.5-4.5 observed with full spectral coverage from 315 to 2500 nm at a resolving power ranging from R~4000 to 7000, depending on wavelength. The median signal-to-noise ratios are 33, 25 and 43, as measured at rest-frame wavelengths 1700, 3000 and 3600 Angstrom, respectively. This paper provides future users of XQ-100 data with the basic statistics of the survey, along with details of target selection, data acquisition and data reduction. The paper accompanies the public release of all data products, including 100 reduced spectra. XQ-100 is the largest spectroscopic survey to date of high-redshift QSOs with simultaneous rest-frame UV/optical coverage, and as such enables a wide range of extragalactic research, from cosmology and galaxy evolution to AGN astrophysics.
  • We present the first detection of molecular emission from a galaxy selected to be near a projected background quasar using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The ALMA detection of CO(1$-$0) emission from the $z=0.101$ galaxy toward quasar PKS 0439-433 is coincident with its stellar disk and yields a molecular gas mass of $M_{\rm mol} \approx 4.2 \times 10^9 M_\odot$ (for a Galactic CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor), larger than the upper limit on its atomic gas mass. We resolve the CO velocity field, obtaining a rotational velocity of $134 \pm 11$ km s$^{-1}$, and a resultant dynamical mass of $\geq 4 \times 10^{10} M_\odot$. Despite its high metallicity and large molecular mass, the $z=0.101$ galaxy has a low star formation rate, implying a large gas consumption timescale, larger than that typical of late-type galaxies. Most of the molecular gas is hence likely to be in a diffuse extended phase, rather than in dense molecular clouds. By combining the results of emission and absorption studies, we find that the strongest molecular absorption component toward the quasar cannot arise from the molecular disk, but is likely to arise from diffuse gas in the galaxy's circumgalactic medium. Our results emphasize the potential of combining molecular and stellar emission line studies with optical absorption line studies to achieve a more complete picture of the gas within and surrounding high-redshift galaxies.
  • We present VLT/X-Shooter and MUSE spectroscopy of an faint F814W=28.60+/-0.33 (Muv=-17.0), low mass (~<10^7 Msun) and compact (Reff=62pc) freshly star-forming galaxy at z=3.1169 magnified (16x) by the Hubble Frontier Fields galaxy cluster Abell S1063. Gravitational lensing allows for a significant jump toward low-luminosity regimes, in moderately high resolution spectroscopy (R=lambda/dlambda ~ 3000-7400). We measured CIV1548,1550, HeII1640, OIII]1661,1666, CIII]1907,1909, Hbeta, [OIII]4959,5007, emission lines with FWHM< 50 km/s and (de-lensed) fluxes spanning the interval 1.0x10^-19 - 2.0x10^-18 erg/s/cm2 at S/N=4-30. The double peaked Lya emission with Delta_v(red-blue) = 280(+/-7)km/s and de-lensed fluxes 2.4_(blue)|8.5_(red)x10^-18 erg/s/cm2 (S/N=38_(blue)|110_(red)) indicate a low column density of neutral hydrogen gas consistent with a highly ionized interstellar medium as also inferred from the large [OIII]5007/[OII]3727>10 ratio. We detect CIV1548,1550 resonant doublet in emission, each component with FWHM ~< 45 km/s, and redshifted by +51(+/-10)km/s relative to the systemic redshift. We interpret this as nebular emission tracing an expanding optically-thin interstellar medium. Both CIV1548,1550 and HeII1640 suggest the presence of hot and massive stars (with a possible faint AGN). The ultraviolet slope is remarkably blue, beta =-2.95 +/- 0.20 (F_lambda=lambda^beta), consistent with a dust-free and young ~<20 Myr galaxy. Line ratios suggest an oxygen abundance 12+log(O/H)<7.8. We are witnessing an early episode of star-formation in which a relatively low NHI and negligible dust attenuation might favor a leakage of ionizing radiation. This galaxy currently represents a unique low-luminosity reference object for future studies of the reionization epoch with JWST.
  • We present a strong lensing system, composed of 4 multiple images of a source at z = 2.387, created by two lens galaxies, G1 and G2, belonging to the galaxy cluster MACS J1115.9+0129 at z = 0.353. We use observations taken as part of the Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble, CLASH, and its spectroscopic follow-up programme at the Very Large Telescope, CLASH-VLT, to estimate the total mass distributions of the two galaxies and the cluster through strong gravitational lensing models. We find that the total projected mass values within the half-light radii, R_{e}, of the two lens galaxies are M_{T,G1}(< R_{e,G1}) = (3.6 +/- 0.4) x 10^{10}M_{Sun} and M_{T,G2}(< R_{e,G2}) = (4.2 +/- 1.6) x 10^{10}M_{Sun}. The effective velocity dispersion values of G1 and G2 are (122 +/- 7) km/s and (137 +/- 27) km/s, respectively. We remark that these values are relatively low when compared to those of ~200-300 km/s, typical of lens galaxies found in the field by previous surveys. By fitting the spectral energy distributions of G1 and G2, we measure projected luminous over total mass fractions within R_{e} of 0.11 +/- 0.03, for G1, and 0.73 +/- 0.32, for G2. The fact that the less massive galaxy, G1, is dark-matter dominated in its inner regions raises the question of whether the dark matter fraction in the core of early-type galaxies depends on their mass. Further investigating strong lensing systems will help us understand the influence that dark matter has on the structure and evolution of the inner regions of galaxies.
  • We have acquired Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Very Large Telescope near-infrared spectra and images of supernova (SN) Refsdal after its discovery as an Einstein cross in Fall 2014. The HST light curve of SN Refsdal matches the distinctive, slowly rising light curves of SN 1987A-like supernovae (SNe), and we find strong evidence for a broad H-alpha P-Cygni profile in the HST grism spectrum at the redshift (z = 1.49) of the spiral host galaxy. SNe IIn, powered by circumstellar interaction, could provide a good match to the light curve of SN Refsdal, but the spectrum of a SN IIn would not show broad and strong H-alpha absorption. From the grism spectrum, we measure an H-alpha expansion velocity consistent with those of SN 1987A-like SNe at a similar phase. The luminosity, evolution, and Gaussian profile of the H-alpha emission of the WFC3 and X-shooter spectra, separated by ~2.5 months in the rest frame, provide additional evidence that supports the SN 1987A-like classification. In comparison with other examples of SN 1987A-like SNe, SN Refsdal has a blue B-V color and a high luminosity for the assumed range of potential magnifications. If SN Refsdal can be modeled as a scaled version of SN 1987A, we estimate it would have an ejecta mass of 20+-5 solar masses. The evolution of the light curve at late times will provide additional evidence about the potential existence of any substantial circumstellar material (CSM). Using MOSFIRE and X-shooter spectra, we estimate a subsolar host-galaxy metallicity (8.3+-0.1 dex and <8.4 dex, respectively) near the explosion site.
  • We present a sample of 38 intervening Damped Lyman $\alpha$ (DLA) systems identified towards 100 $z>3.5$ quasars, observed during the XQ-100 survey. The XQ-100 DLA sample is combined with major DLA surveys in the literature. The final combined sample consists of 742 DLAs over a redshift range approximately $1.6 < z_{\rm abs} < 5.0$. We develop a novel technique for computing $\Omega_{\rm HI}^{\rm DLA}$ as a continuous function of redshift, and we thoroughly assess and quantify the sources of error therein, including fitting errors and incomplete sampling of the high column density end of the column density distribution function. There is a statistically significant redshift evolution in $\Omega_{\rm HI}^{\rm DLA}$ ($\geq 3 \sigma$) from $z \sim 2$ to $z \sim$ 5. In order to make a complete assessment of the redshift evolution of $\Omega_{\rm HI}$, we combine our high redshift DLA sample with absorption surveys at intermediate redshift and 21cm emission line surveys of the local universe. Although $\Omega_{\rm HI}^{\rm DLA}$, and hence its redshift evolution, remains uncertain in the intermediate redshift regime ($0.1 < z_{\rm abs} < 1.6$), we find that the combination of high redshift data with 21cm surveys of the local universe all yield a statistically significant evolution in $\Omega_{\rm HI}$ from $z \sim 0$ to $z \sim 5$ ($\geq 3 \sigma$). Despite its statistical significance, the magnitude of the evolution is small: a linear regression fit between $\Omega_{\rm HI}$ and $z$ yields a typical slope of $\sim$0.17$\times 10^{-3}$, corresponding to a factor of $\sim$ 4 decrease in $\Omega_{\rm HI}$ between $z=5$ and $z=0$.
  • We have obtained deep NIR narrow and broad (J and Y) band imaging data of the GOODS-South field. The narrow band filter is centered at 1060 nm corresponding to redshifts $z = 0.62, 1.15, 1.85$ for the strong emission lines H$\alpha$, $[$OIII$]$/H$\beta$ and $[$OII$]$, respectively. From those data we extract a well defined sample ($M(AB)=24.8$ in the narrow band) of objects with large emission line equivalent widths in the narrow band. Via SED fits to published broad band data we identify which of the three lines we have detected and assign redshifts accordingly. This results in a well defined, strong emission line selected sample of galaxies down to lower masses than can easily be obtained with only continuum flux limited selection techniques. We compare the (SED fitting-derived) main sequence of star-formation (MS) of our sample to previous works and find that it has a steeper slope than that of samples of more massive galaxies. We conclude that the MS steepens at lower (below $M_{\star} = 10^{9.4} M_{\odot}$) galaxy masses. We also show that the SFR at any redshift is higher in our sample. We attribute this to the targeted selection of galaxies with large emission line equivalent widths, and conclude that our sample presumably forms the upper boundary of the MS. We briefly investigate and outline how samples with accurate redshifts down to those low stellar masses open a new window to study the formation of large scale structure in the early universe. In particular we report on the detection of a young galaxy cluster at $z=1.85$ which features a central massive galaxy which is the candidate of an early stage cD galaxy, and we identify a likely filament mapped out by $[$OIII$]$ and $H\beta$ emitting galaxies at $z=1.15$.
  • Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are very bright explosions that were only discovered recently and that show a preference for occurring in faint dwarf galaxies. Understanding why stellar evolution yields different types of stellar explosions in these environments is fundamental in order to both uncover the elusive progenitors of SLSNe and to study star formation in dwarf galaxies. In this paper, we present the first results of our project to study SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES, focusing on the sample for which we have obtained spectroscopy. We show that SLSNe-I and SLSNe-R (hydrogen-poor) often (~50% in our sample) occur in a class of galaxies that is known as Extreme Emission Line Galaxies (EELGs). The probability of this happening by chance is negligible and we therefore conclude that the extreme environmental conditions and the SLSN phenomenon are related. In contrast, SLSNe-II (hydrogen-rich) occur in more massive, more metal-rich galaxies with softer radiation fields. Therefore, if SLSNe-II constitute a uniform class, their progenitor systems are likely different from those of H-poor SLSNe. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are, on average, not found in as extreme environments as H-poor SLSNe. We propose that H-poor SLSNe result from the very first stars exploding in a starburst, even earlier than GRBs. This might indicate a bottom-light initial mass function in these systems. SLSNe present a novel method of selecting candidate EELGs independent of their luminosity.
  • We present the first observations of the Frontier Fields Cluster Abell S1063 taken with the newly commissioned Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field spectrograph. Because of the relatively large field of view (1 arcmin^2), MUSE is ideal to simultaneously target multiple galaxies in blank and cluster fields over the full optical spectrum. We analysed the four hours of data obtained in the Science Verification phase on this cluster and measured redshifts for 53 galaxies. We confirm the redshift of five cluster galaxies, and determine the redshift of 29 other cluster members. Behind the cluster, we find 17 galaxies at higher redshift, including three previously unknown Lyman-alpha emitters at z>3, and five multiply-lensed galaxies. We report the detection of a new z=4.113 multiply lensed galaxy, with images that are consistent with lensing model predictions derived for the Frontier Fields. We detect C III], C IV, and He II emission in a multiply lensed galaxy at z=3.116, suggesting the likely presence of an active galactic nucleus. We also created narrow-band images from the MUSE datacube to automatically search for additional line emitters corresponding to high-redshift candidates, but we could not identify any significant detections other than those found by visual inspection. With the new redshifts, it will become possible to obtain an accurate mass reconstruction in the core of Abell S1063 through refined strong lensing modelling. Overall, our results illustrate the breadth of scientific topics that can be addressed with a single MUSE pointing. We conclude that MUSE is a very efficient instrument to observe galaxy clusters, enabling their mass modelling, and to perform a blind search for high-redshift galaxies.
  • Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRBs) afterglows probe sightlines to star-forming regions in distant star-forming galaxies. Here we present a study of the peculiar afterglow spectrum of the z = 0.889 Swift GRB 140506A. Aims. Our aim is to understand the origin of the very unusual properties of the absorption along the line-of-sight. Methods. We analyse spectroscopic observations obtained with the X-shooter spectrograph mounted on the ESO/VLT at two epochs 8.8 h and 33 h after the burst as well as imaging from the GROND instrument. We also present imaging and spectroscopy of the host galaxy obtained with the Magellan telescope. Results. The underlying afterglow appears to be a typical afterglow of a long-duration GRB. However, the material along the line-of- sight has imprinted very unusual features on the spectrum. Firstly, there is a very broad and strong flux drop below 8000 AA (4000 AA in the rest frame), which seems to be variable between the two spectroscopic epochs. We can reproduce the flux-drops both as a giant 2175 AA extinction bump and as an effect of multiple scattering on dust grains in a dense environment. Secondly, we detect absorption lines from excited H i and He i. We also detect molecular absorption from CH+ . Conclusions. We interpret the unusual properties of these spectra as reflecting the presence of three distinct regions along the line-of-sight: the excited He i absorption originates from an H ii-region, whereas the Balmer absorption must originate from an associated photodissociation region. The strong metal line and molecular absorption and the dust extinction must originate from a third, cooler region along the line-of-sight. The presence of (at least) three separate regions is reflected in the fact that the different absorption components have different velocities relative to the systemic redshift of the host galaxy.
  • A scaling relation has recently been suggested to combine the galaxy mass-metallicity (MZ) relation with metallicities of damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs) in quasar spectra. Based on this relation the stellar masses of the absorbing galaxies can be predicted. We test this prediction by measuring the stellar masses of 12 galaxies in confirmed DLA absorber - galaxy pairs in the redshift range 0.1<z<3.2. We find an excellent agreement between the predicted and measured stellar masses over three orders of magnitude, and we determine the average offset $\langle C_{[M/H]} \rangle$ = 0.44+/-0.10 between absorption and emission metallicities. We further test if $C_{[M/H]}$ could depend on the impact parameter and find a correlation at the 5.5sigma level. The impact parameter dependence of the metallicity corresponds to an average metallicity difference of -0.022+/-0.004 dex/kpc. By including this metallicity vs. impact parameter correlation in the prescription instead of $C_{[M/H]}$, the scatter reduces to 0.39 dex in log M*. We provide a prescription how to calculate the stellar mass (M*,DLA) of the galaxy when both the DLA metallicity and DLA galaxy impact parameter is known. We demonstrate that DLA galaxies follow the MZ relation for luminosity-selected galaxies at z=0.7 and z=2.2 when we include a correction for the correlation between impact parameter and metallicity.
  • This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C8H5F) and dissociating, laseraligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C6H4Br2) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules. We also show how the strong nanosecond laser pulse used for adiabatically laser-aligning the molecules influences the measured electron and ion spectra and angular distributions, and discuss how this may affect the outcome of future time-resolved photoelectron diffraction experiments.