• For more than forty years virtually all work on the theory of type Ia Supernovae (SN Ia) has assumed that these explosions were due to the transfer of mass to a degenerate star from a partner in a binary system. In these binary models, when the mass of one partner closely approaches the Chandrasekhar maximum for a stable degenerate system, fusion can be initiated and the star explodes. However, there are now a number of indications that fusion could instead be triggered by a phase transition in a sub-Chandrasekhar white dwarf star. Although these indications provide no clue as to what specific phase transition initiates the explosion, it is possible that remarkable and well established host galaxy effects as considered in the present work could point to a specific source of the energy deposition. These host galaxy correlations are, at first glance, surprising since the typical distance scale of white dwarf stars is the earth radius while the typical distance between stars is at the light year scale. Performing a least $\chi^2$ fit to the delay time distribution to fix parameters, we give predictions from the susy phase transition model for the host galaxy effects. In addition we discuss a susy insight into the Phillips relation which is basic to the cosmological importance of the type Ia supernovae.
  • After more than forty years since the basic standard model for supernovae Ia was proposed many astronomers are still hopeful that this phenomenon will ultimately be understood in terms of Newtonian gravity plus nuclear and particle physics as they existed in the 1930's. In spite of this fact there are at least six nagging puzzles in supernova physics that suggest some radical new physics input may be necessary. "Radical" in this context means a physics idea that did not exist in the 1930's and that is still not experimentally confirmed in 2017.
  • We pursue the investigation of a model for sub-Chandrasekhar supernovae Ia explosions (SNIa) in which the energy stored in the Pauli tower is released to trigger a nuclear deflagration. The simplest physical model for such a degeneracy breakdown is a phase transition to an exactly supersymmetric state in which the scalar partners of protons, neutrons, and leptons become degenerate with the familiar fermions of our world as in the supersymmetric standard model with susy breaking parameters relaxed to zero. We focus on the ability of the susy phase transition model to fit the total SNIa rate as well as the delay time distribution of SNIa after the birth of a progenitor white dwarf. We also study the ejected mass distribution and its correlation with delay time. Finally, we discuss the expected SNIa remnant in the form of a black hole of Jupiter mass or lower and the prospects for detecting such remnants.
  • We discuss how entropy bounds, which are not respected in the standard cosmology, constrain the parameters of a previously suggested cosmology with a finite total mass. In that alternative cosmology the matter density was postulated to be a spatial delta function at the time of the big bang thereafter diffusing rapidly outward with constant total mass. Also discussed here are some related issues including the cosmic onion question, the information content of the universe, and the question of whether light trapping regions exist on a cosmic scale.
  • We discuss various space-time metrics which are compatible with Einstein's equations and a previously suggested cosmology with a finite total mass. In this alternative cosmology the matter density was postulated to be a spatial delta function at the time of the big bang thereafter diffusing outward with constant total mass. This proposal explores a departure from standard assumptions that the big bang occurred everywhere at once or was just one of an infinite number of previous and later transitions.
  • In what has become a standard eternal inflation picture of the string landscape there are many problematic consequences and a difficulty defining probabilities for the occurrence of each type of universe. One feature in particular that might be philosophically disconcerting is the infinite cloning of each individual and each civilization in infinite numbers of separated regions of the multiverse. Even if this is not ruled out due to causal separation one should ask whether the infinite cloning is a universal prediction of string landscape models or whether there are scenarios in which it is avoided. If a viable alternative cosmology can be constructed one might search for predictions that might allow one to discriminate experimentally between the models. We present one such scenario although, in doing so, we are forced to give up several popular presuppositions including the absence of a preferred frame and the homogeneity of matter in the universe. The model also has several ancillary advantages. We also consider the future lifetime of the current universe before becoming a light trapping region.
  • We present a model for the triggering of Supernovae Ia (SN Ia) by a phase transition to exact supersymmetry (susy) in the core of a white dwarf star. The model, which accomodates the data on SN Ia and avoids the problems of the standard astrophysical accretion based picture, is based on string landscape ideas and assumes that the decay of the false broken susy vacuum is enhanced at high density. In a slowly expanding susy bubble, the conversion of pairs of fermions to pairs of degenerate scalars releases a significant amount of energy which induces fusion in the surrounding normal matter shell. After cooling, the absence of degeneracy pressure causes the susy bubble to collapse to a black hole of about 0.1 solar mass or to some other stable susy object.
  • We propose a model for supernovae Ia explosions based on a phase transition to a supersymmetric state which becomes the active trigger for the deflagration starting the explosion in an isolated sub-Chandrasekhar white dwarf star. With two free parameters we fit the rate and several properties of type Ia supernovae and address the gap in the supermassive black hole mass distribution. One parameter is a critical density fit to about $3 \cdot 10^7$ g/cc while the other has the units of a space time volume and is found to be of order $0.05\,$ Gyr $R_E^3$ where $R_E$ is the earth radius. The model involves a phase transition to an exact supersymmetry in a small core of a dense star.
  • We refine a previous zeroth order analysis of the nuclear properties of a supersymmetric (susy) universe with standard model particle content plus degenerate susy partners. No assumptions are made concerning the Higgs structure except we assume that the degenerate fermion/sfermion masses are non-zero. This alternate universe has been dubbed Susyria and it has been proposed that such a world may exist with zero vacuum energy in the string landscape.
  • Current attempts to understand supersymmetry (susy) breaking are focused on the idea that we are not in the ground state of the universe but, instead, in a metastable state that will ultimately decay to an exactly susy ground state. It is interesting to ask how experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will shed light on the properties of this future supersymmetric universe. In particular we ask how we can determine whether this final state has the possibility of supporting atoms and molecules in a susy background.
  • The Pauli Exclusion principle plays an essential role in the structure of the current universe. However, in an exactly supersymmetric (susy) universe, the degeneracy of bosons and fermions plus the ability of fermions to convert in pairs to bosons implies that the effects of the Pauli principle would be largely absent. Such a universe may eventually occur through vacuum decay from our current positive vacuum energy universe to the zero vacuum energy universe of exact susy. It has been shown that in such a susy universe ionic molecular binding does exist but homonuclear diatomic molecules are left unbound. In this paper we provide a first look at covalent binding in a susy background and compare the properties of the homonuclear bound states with those of the corresponding molecules in our universe. We find that covalent binding of diatomic molecules is very strong in an exact susy universe and the interatomic distances are in general much smaller than in the broken susy universe.
  • It has long been known that the broken supersymmetric (susy) phase of the singlet extended susy higgs model (SESHM) is at best metastable and the ground states of the model have vanishing vacuum energy and are exactly supersymmetric. If the SESHM is confirmed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the numerical values of the parameters of the model have a bearing on key properties of the susy phase and might provide an estimate of the remaining time before a possible decay of our false vacuum. We provide some analysis of the model including a treatment of phases in the potential and soft higgs masses.
  • From several points of view it is strongly suggested that the current universe is unstable and will ultimately decay to one that is exactly supersymmetric (susy). The possibility that atoms and molecules form in this future universe requires that the degenerate electron/selectron mass is non-zero and hence that electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) survives the phase transition to exact susy. However, the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and several of its extensions have no EWSB in the susy limit. Among the extended higgs models that have been discussed one stands out in this regard. The higgs sector that is revealed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will therefore have implications for the future universe. We also address the question as to whether the transition to the exact susy phase with EWSB is exothermic.
  • String landscape ideas and the observation of a positive vacuum energy in the current universe suggest that there could be a future transition to an exactly supersymmetric world. Atomic and molecular binding in this susy background probably require that electroweak symmetry breaking survives the transition. Among several susy higgs models that have been discussed, one stands out in this regard. Thus, the higgs structure that is revealed at the LHC could have strong consequences for the type of bulk matter that may arise in a future susy universe.
  • From string theory and the observation of a positive vacuum energy in our universe it seems inevitable that there will eventually be a phase transition to an exactly supersymmetric (susy) universe. In this phase there will be an effective weakening of the Pauli principle due to fermi-bose degeneracy. As a consequence molecular binding will be significantly affected. We make some general comments on susy molecules and perform a variational principle estimate of ionic binding energies.
  • March 20, 2007 hep-ph
    The anthropic principle is based on the observation that, within narrow bounds, the laws of physics are such as to have allowed the evolution of life. The string theoretic approach to understanding this observation is based on the expectation that the effective potential has an enormous number of local minima with different particle masses and perhaps totally different fundamental couplings and space time topology. The vast majority of these alternative universes are totally inhospitable to life, having, for example, vacuum energies near the natural (Planck) scale. The statistics, however, are assumed to be such that a few of these local minima (and not more) have a low enough vacuum energy and suitable other properties to support life. In the inflationary era, the "multiverse" made successive transitions between the available minima until arriving at our current state of low vacuum energy. String theory, however, also suggests that the absolute minimum of the effective potential is exactly supersymmetric. Questions then arise as to why the inflationary era did not end by a transition to one of these, when will the universe make the phase transition to the exactly supersymmetric ground state, and what will be the properties of this final state.
  • The fact that life has evolved in our universe constrains the laws of physics. The anthropic principle proposes that these constraints are sometimes very tight and can be used to explain in a sense the corresponding laws. Recently a "disproof" of the anthropic principle has been proposed in the form of a universe without weak interactions, but with other parameters suitably tuned to nevertheless allow life to develop. If a universe with such different physics from ours can generate life, the anthropic principle is undermined. We point out, however, that on closer examination the proposed "weakless" universe strongly inhibits the development of life in several different ways. One of the most critical barriers is that a weakless universe is unlikely to produce enough oxygen to support life. Since oxygen is an essential element in both water, the universal solvent needed for life, and in each of the four bases forming the DNA code for known living beings, we strongly question the hypothesis that a universe without weak interactions could generate life.
  • The observation in the universe of a small but positive vacuum energy strongly suggests, in the string landscape picture, that there will ultimately be a phase transition to an exactly supersymmetric universe. This ground state or "true vacuum" of the universe could be similar to the minimal supersymmetric standard model with all the susy breaking parameters set to zero. Alternatively, it might be similar to the prominent superstring theories with nine flat space dimensions or to the supersymmetric anti-deSitter model that seems to be equivalent to a conformal field theory. We propose that the dominant phenomenological feature of these potential future universes is the weakening of the Pauli principle due to Fermi-Bose degeneracy. Providing the phase transition occurs in the cosmologically near future, an exact supersymmetry could extend the life expectancy of intelligent civilizations far beyond what would be possible in the broken susy universe.
  • The evidence for a positive vacuum energy in our universe suggests that we might be living in a false vacuum destined to ultimately decay to a true vacuum free of dark energy. At present the simplest example of such a universe is one that is exactly supersymmetric (susy). It is expected that the nucleation rate of critically sized susy bubbles will be enhanced in regions of high density such as in degenerate stars. The consequent release of energy stored in Pauli towers provides a possible model for gamma ray bursts. Whether or not all or any of the currently observed bursts are due to this mechanism, it is important to define the signatures of this susy phase transition. After such a burst, due to the lifting of degeneracy pressure, the star would be expected to collapse into a black hole even though its mass is below the Chandrasekhar limit. Previous studies have treated the star as fully releasing its stored energy before the collapse. In this article we make an initial investigation of the effects of the collapse during the gamma ray emission.
  • In the string landscape picture, the effective potential is characterized by an enormous number of local minima of which only a minuscule fraction are suitable for the evolution of life. In this "multiverse", random transitions are continually made between the various minima with the most likely transitions being to minima of lower vacuum energy. The inflationary era in the very early universe ended with such a transition to our current phase which is described by a broken supersymmetry and a small, positive vacuum energy. However, it is likely that an exactly supersymmetric (susy) phase of zero vacuum energy as in the original superstring theory also exists and that, at some time in the future, there will be a transition to this susy world. In this article we make some preliminary estimates of the consequences of such a transition.
  • We propose a model for gamma ray bursts in which a star subject to a high level of fermion degeneracy undergoes a phase transition to a supersymmetric state. The burst is initiated by the transition of fermion pairs to sfermion pairs which, uninhibited by the Pauli exclusion principle, can drop to the ground state of minimum momentum through photon emission. The jet structure is attributed to the Bose statistics of sfermions whereby subsequent sfermion pairs are preferentially emitted into the same state (sfermion amplification by stimulated emission). Bremsstrahlung gamma rays tend to preserve the directional information of the sfermion momenta and are themselves enhanced by stimulated emission.
  • In a dense star, the Pauli exclusion principle functions as an enormous energy storage mechanism. Supersymmetry could provide a way to recapture this energy. If there is a transition to an exactly supersymmetric (susy) phase, the trapped energy can be released with consequences similar to gamma ray burst observations. Previous zeroth order calculations have been based on the behavior in a prototypical white dwarf of solar mass and earth radius (such as Sirius B) and have neglected density inhomogeneity. In this article we show that the effects of density inhomogeneity and of variations in masses and radii are substantial enough to encourage further exploration of the susy star model. In addition, the effects discussed here have possible applications to the growth of bubbles in other phase transition models in dense matter.
  • In the standard model, energy release in dense stars is severely restricted by the Pauli exclusion principle. However, if, in regions of space of high fermion degeneracy, there is a phase transition to a state of exact supersymmetry (SUSY), fermion to sfermion pair conversion followed by radiative transitions to the Bose ground state could lead to a highly collimated gamma ray burst. We calculate the cross section for electron to selectron pair conversion in a SUSY bubble and construct a monte carlo for the resulting sfermion amplification by stimulated emission.
  • For several decades the energy source powering supernovae and gamma ray bursts has been a troubling mystery. Many articles on these phenomena have been content to model the consequences of an unknown "central engine" depositing a large amount of energy in a small region. In the case of supernovae this is somewhat unsettling since the type 1a supernovae are assumed to be "standardizable candles" from which important information concerning the dark energy can be derived. It should be expected that a more detailed understanding of supernovae dynamics could lead to a reduction of the errors in this relationship. Similarly, the current state of the standard model theory of gamma ray bursts, which in some cases have been associated with supernovae, has conceptual gaps not only in the central engine but also in the mechanism for jet collimation and the lack of baryon loading. We discuss here the Supersymmetric (susy) phase transition model for the central engine.
  • Assuming the lightest supersymmetric particle is the gluino, we treat the decays gluino->quark-antiquark-neutrino and gluino->gluon-neutrino. Such couplings can be induced by the R parity violating quark-squark-lepton interaction which can also be responsible for neutrino masses and mixings. These R parity violating gluino decays have the same final state structure (jets plus missing energy) as previously considered decays into quark-antiquark-photino and gluon-gravitino but with significantly different gluino lifetimes.