• Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) cosmic-ray (CR) fluxes from satellites and balloon-borne experiments are snapshots of the solar activity imprinted on the interstellar (IS) fluxes. Given a series of snapshots, the unknown IS flux shape and the level of modulation (for each snapshot) can be recovered. We wish (i) to provide the most accurate determination of the IS H and He fluxes from TOA data alone, (ii) to obtain the associated modulation levels (and uncertainties) while fully accounting for the correlations with the IS flux uncertainties, and (iii) to inspect whether the minimal force-field approximation is sufficient to explain all the data at hand. Using H and He TOA measurements, including the recent high-precision AMS, BESS-Polar, and PAMELA data, we performed a non-parametric fit of the IS fluxes $J^{\rm IS}_{\rm H,~He}$ and modulation level $\phi_i$ for each data-taking period. We relied on a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) engine to extract the probability density function and correlations (hence the credible intervals) of the sought parameters. Although H and He are the most abundant and best measured CR species, several datasets had to be excluded from the analysis because of inconsistencies with other measurements. From the subset of data passing our consistency cut, we provide ready-to-use best-fit and credible intervals for the H and He IS fluxes from MeV/n to PeV/n energy (with a relative precision in the range [2-10\%] at 1$\sigma$). Given the strong correlation between $J^{\rm IS}$ and $\phi_i$ parameters, the uncertainties on $J^{\rm IS}$ translate into $\Delta\phi\approx \pm 30$~MV (at 1$\sigma$) for all experiments. We also find that the presence of $^3$He in He data biases $\phi$ towards higher $\phi$ values by $\sim 30$~MV. The force-field approximation gives an excellent ($\chi^2/$dof$=1.02$) description of the recent high-precision TOA H and He fluxes.
  • Primary cosmic-ray elemental spectra have been measured with the balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment since 2004. The third CREAM payload (CREAM-III) flew for 29 days during the 2007-2008 Antarctic season. Energies of incident particles above 1 TeV are measured with a calorimeter. Individual elements are clearly separated with a charge resolution of ~0.12 e (in charge units) and ~0.14 e for protons and helium nuclei, respectively, using two layers of silicon charge detectors. The measured proton and helium energy spectra at the top of the atmosphere are harder than other existing measurements at a few tens of GeV. The relative abundance of protons to helium nuclei is 9.53+-0.03 for the range of 1 TeV/n to 63 TeV/n. The ratio is considerably smaller than other measurements at a few tens of GeV/n. The spectra become softer above ~20 TeV. However, our statistical uncertainties are large at these energies and more data are needed.
  • The level of solar modulation at different times (related to the solar activity) is a central question of solar and galactic cosmic-ray physics. In the first paper of this series, we have established a correspondence between the uncertainties on ground-based detectors count rates and the parameter $\phi$ (modulation level in the force-field approximation) reconstructed from these count rates. In this second paper, we detail a procedure to obtain a reference $\phi$ time series from neutron monitor data. We show that we can have an unbiased and accurate $\phi$ reconstruction ($\Delta\phi/\phi\simeq 10\%$). We also discuss the potential of Bonner spheres spectrometers and muon detectors to provide $\phi$ time series. Two by-products of this calculation are updated $\phi$ values for the cosmic-ray database and a web interface to retrieve and plot $\phi$ from the 50's to today (\url{http://lpsc.in2p3.fr/crdb}).
  • We developed a highly integrated and versatile electronic module to equip small nuclear physics experiments and lab teaching classes: the User friendly Configurable Trigger, scaler and delay Module for nuclear and particle physics (UCTM). It is configurable through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and provides a large number of possible trigger conditions without any Hardware Description Language (HDL) required knowledge. This new version significantly enhances the previous capabilities by providing two additional features: signal digitization and time measurements. The design, performances and a typical application are presented.
  • Particles count rates at given Earth location and altitude result from the convolution of (i) the interstellar (IS) cosmic-ray fluxes outside the solar cavity, (ii) the time-dependent modulation of IS into Top-of-Atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, (iii) the rigidity cut-off (or geomagnetic transmission function) and grammage at the counter location, (iv) the atmosphere response to incoming TOA cosmic rays (shower development), and (v) the counter response to the various particles/energies in the shower. Count rates from neutron monitors or muon counters are therefore a proxy to solar activity. In this paper, we review all ingredients, discuss how their uncertainties impact count rate calculations, and how they translate into variation/uncertainties on the level of solar modulation $\varphi$ (in the simple Force-Field approximation). The main uncertainty for neutron monitors is related to the yield function. However, many other effects have a significant impact, at the 5-10\% level on $\varphi$ values. We find no clear ranking of the dominant effects, as some depend on the station position and/or the weather and/or the season. An abacus to translate any variation of count rates (for neutron and $\mu$ detectors) to a variation of the solar modulation $\varphi$ is provided.
  • A configurable trigger scaler and delay NIM module has been designed to equip nuclear physics experiments and lab teaching classes. It is configurable through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and provides a large number of possible trigger conditions without any Hardware Description Language (HDL) required knowledge. The design, performances and typical applications are presented.
  • The secondary-to-primary B/C ratio is widely used to study Galactic cosmic-ray propagation processes. The 2H/4He and 3He/4He ratios probe a different Z/A regime, therefore testing the `universality' of propagation. We revisit the constraints on diffusion-model parameters set by the quartet (1H, 2H, 3He, 4He), using the most recent data as well as updated formulae for the inelastic and production cross-sections. The analysis relies on the USINE propagation package and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to estimate the probability density functions of the parameters. Simulated data are also used to validate analysis strategies. The fragmentation of CNO cosmic rays (resp. NeMgSiFe) on the ISM during their propagation contributes to 20% (resp. 20%) of the 2H and 15% (resp. 10%) of the 3He flux at high energy. The C to Fe elements are also responsible for up to 10% of the 4He flux measured at 1 GeV/n. The analysis of 3He/4He (and to a less extent 2H/4He) data shows that the transport parameters are consistent with those from the B/C analysis: the diffusion model with delta~0.7 (diffusion slope), Vc~20 km/s (galactic wind), Va~40 km/s (reacceleration) is favoured, but the combination delta~0.2, Vc~0, and Va~80 km/s is a close second. The confidence intervals on the parameters show that the constraints set by the quartet data are competitive with those brought by the B/C data. These constraints are tighter when adding the 3He (or 2H) flux measurements, and the tightest when further adding the He flux. For the latter, the analysis of simulated and real data show an increased sensitivity to biases. Using secondary-to-primary ratio along with a loose prior on the source parameters is recommended to get the most robust constraints on the transport parameters.
  • A proximity focusing Cherenkov imager called CHERCAM, has been built for the charge measurement of nuclear cosmic rays with the CREAM instrument. It consists of a silica aerogel radiator plane across from a detector plane equipped with 1,600 1" diameter photomultipliers. The two planes are separated by a ring expansion gap. The Cherenkov light yield is proportional to the charge squared of the incident particle. The expected relative light collection accuracy is in the few percents range. It leads to an expected single element separation over the range of nuclear charge Z of main interest 1 < Z < 26. CHERCAM is designed to fly with the CREAM balloon experiment. The design of the instrument and the implemented technical solutions allowing its safe operation in high altitude conditions (radiations, low pressure, cold) are presented.
  • On-going measurements of the cosmic radiation (nuclear, electronic, and gamma-ray) are shedding new light on cosmic-ray physics. A comprehensive picture of these data relies on an accurate determination of the transport and source parameters of propagation models. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo is used to obtain these parameters in a diffusion model. From the measurement of the B/C ratio and radioactive cosmic-ray clocks, we calculate their probability density functions, with a special emphasis on the halo size L of the Galaxy and the local underdense bubble of size r_h. The analysis relies on the USINE code for propagation and on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique (Putze et al. 2009, paper I of this series) for the parameter determination. As found in previous studies, the B/C best-fit model favours diffusion/convection/reacceleration (Model III) over diffusion/reacceleration (Model II). A combined fit on B/C and the isotopic ratios (10Be/9Be, 26Al/27Al, 36Cl/Cl) leads to L ~ 8 kpc and r_h ~ 120 pc for the best-fit Model III. This value for r_h is consistent with direct measurements of the local interstallar medium. For Model II, L ~ 4 kpc and r_h is consistent with zero. We showed the potential and usefulness of the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique in the analysis of cosmic-ray measurements in diffusion models. The size of the diffusive halo depends crucially on the value of the diffusion slope delta, and also on the presence/absence of the local underdensity damping effect on radioactive nuclei. More precise data from on-going experiments are expected to clarify this issue.
  • The B/C ratio is used in cosmic-ray physics to constrain the transport parameters. However, from the same set of data, the various published values show a puzzling large scatter of these parameters. We investigate the impact of using different inputs (gas density and hydrogen fraction in the Galactic disc, source spectral shape, low-energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient, and nuclear fragmentation cross-sections) on the best-fit values of the transport parameters. We quantify the systematics produced when varying these inputs, and compare them to statistical uncertainties. We discuss the consequences for the slope of the diffusion coefficient delta. The analysis relies on the propagation code USINE interfaced with the Minuit minimisation routines. We find the typical systematic uncertainties to be larger than the statistical ones. The several published values of delta (from 0.3 to 0.8) can be recovered when varying the low-energy shape of the diffusion coefficient and the convective wind strength. Models including a convective wind are characterised by delta > 0.6, which cannot be reconcile with the expected theoretical values (1/3 and 1/2). However, from a statistical point of view (chi^2 analysis), models with both reacceleration and convection-hence large delta-are favoured. The next favoured models in line yield delta that can be accommodated with 1/3 and 1/2, but require a strong upturn of the diffusion coefficient at low energy (and no convection). To date, using the best statistical tools, the transport parameter determination is still plagued by many unknowns at low energy (~ GeV/n). To disentangle between all these configurations, measurements of the B/C ratio at TeV/n energies and/or combination with other secondary-to-primary ratios is necessary.
  • Propagation of charged cosmic-rays in the Galaxy depends on the transport parameters, whose number can be large depending on the propagation model under scrutiny. A standard approach for determining these parameters is a manual scan, leading to an inefficient and incomplete coverage of the parameter space. We implement a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), which is well suited to multi-parameter determination. Its specificities (burn-in length, acceptance, and correlation length) are discussed in the phenomenologically well-understood Leaky-Box Model. From a technical point of view, a trial function based on binary-space partitioning is found to be extremely efficient, allowing a simultaneous determination of up to nine parameters, including transport and source parameters, such as slope and abundances. Our best-fit model includes both a low energy cut-off and reacceleration, whose values are consistent with those found in diffusion models. A Kolmogorov spectrum for the diffusion slope (delta=1/3) is excluded. The marginalised probability-density function for delta and alpha (the slope of the source spectra) are delta~0.55-0.60 and alpha~2.14-2.17, depending on the dataset used and the number of free parameters in the fit. All source-spectrum parameters (slope and abundances) are positively correlated among themselves and with the reacceleration strength, but are negatively correlated with the other propagation parameters. A forthcoming study will extend our analysis to more physical diffusion models.
  • The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), whose final version AMS-02 is to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) for at least 3 years, is a detector designed to measure charged cosmic ray spectra with energies up to the TeV region and with high energy photon detection capability up to a few hundred GeV. It is equipped with several subsystems, one of which is a proximity focusing RICH detector with a dual radiator (aerogel+NaF) that provides reliable measurements for particle velocity and charge. The assembly and testing of the AMS RICH is currently being finished and the full AMS detector is expected to be ready by the end of 2008. The RICH detector of AMS-02 is presented. Physics prospects are briefly discussed.
  • The AMS detector, to be installed on the International Space Station, includes a Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector with two different radiators, silica aerogel (n=1.05) and sodium fluoride (n=1.334). This detector is designed to provide very precise measurements of velocity and electric charge in a wide range of cosmic nuclei energies and atomic numbers. The detector geometry, in particular the presence of a reflector for acceptance purposes, leads to complex Cerenkov patterns detected in a pixelized photomultiplier matrix. The results of different reconstruction methods applied to test beam data as well as to simulated samples are presented. To ensure nominal performances throughout the flight, several detector parameters have to be carefully monitored. The algorithms developed to fulfill these requirements are presented. The velocity and charge measurements provided by the RICH detector endow the AMS spectrometer with precise particle identification capabilities in a wide energy range. The expected performances on light isotope separation are discussed.
  • The transport of the nuclear cosmic ray flux in the atmosphere is studied and the atmospheric corrections to be applied to the measurements are calculated. The contribution of the calculated corrections to the accuracy of the experimental results are discussed and evaluated over the kinetic energy range 10-10$^{3}$ GeV/n. The Boron (B) and Carbon (C) elements system is used as a test case. It is shown that the required corrections become largely dominant at the highest energies investigated. The results are discussed.
  • A precise evaluation of the secondary particle production and propagation in the atmosphere is very important for the atmospheric neutrino oscillation studies. The issue is addressed with the extension of a previously developed full 3-Dimensional Monte-Carlo simulation of particle generation and transport in the atmosphere, to compute the flux of secondary protons, muons and neutrinos. Recent balloon borne experiments have performed a set of accurate flux measurements for different particle species at different altitudes in the atmosphere, which can be used to test the calculations for the atmospheric neutrino production, and constrain the underlying hadronic models. The simulation results are reported and compared with the latest flux measurements. It is shown that the level of precision reached by these experiments could be used to constrain the nuclear models used in the simulation. The implication of these results for the atmospheric neutrino flux calculation are discussed.
  • The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) will be equipped with a proximity focusing Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for measuring the electric charge and velocity of the charged cosmic particles. A RICH prototype consisting of 96 photomultiplier units, including a piece of the conical reflector, was built and its performance evaluated with ion beam data. Preliminary results of the in-beam tests performed with ion fragments resulting from collisions of a 158 GeV/c/nuc primary beam of Indium ions (CERN SPS) on a Pb target are reported. The collected data included tests to the final front-end electronics and to different aerogel radiators. Cherenkov rings for a large range of charged nuclei and with reflected photons were observed. The data analysis confirms the design goals. Charge separation up to Fe and velocity resolution of the order of 0.1% for singly charged particles are obtained.
  • The fluxes of light antinuclei A<=4 induced near earth by Cosmic Ray intera ctions with the interstellar matter in the Galaxy and with the Earth atmosphere, are calculated in a phenomenological framework. The hadronic production cross section for antinucleons is based on a recent parametrization of a wide set of accelerator data. The production of light nuclei is calculated using coalescence models. For the standard coalescence model, the coalescence radius is fitted to the available experimental data. The non annihilating inelastic scattering process for the antideuterons is discussed and taken into account for the first time via a more realistic procedure than used so far for antiprotons.
  • A prototype of the AMS Cherenkov imager (RICH) has been tested at CERN by means of a low intensity 20 GeV/c per nucleon ion beam obtained by fragmentation of a primary beam of Pb ions. Data have been collected with a single beam setting, over the range of nuclear charges 2<Z<~45 in various beam conditions and using different radiators. The charge Z and velocity beta resolutions have been measured.
  • The atmospheric secondary antiproton flux is studied for detection altitudes extending from sea level up to about 3 earth radii, by means of a 3-dimensional Monte-Carlo simulation, successfully applied previously on other satellite and balloon data. The calculated antiproton flux at mountain altitude is found in fair agreement with the recent BESS measurements. The flux at balloon altitude is also in agreement with calculations performed in previous studies and used for the analysis of balloon data. The flux at sea level is found to be significant. The antineutron flux is also evaluated. The antiproton flux is prospectively explored at large distance from earth up to around 2 10$^4$ km. The results are discussed in the context of the forthcoming measurements by large acceptance experiments.
  • The atmospheric secondary proton flux is studied for altitudes extending from sea level up to the top of atmosphere by means of a 3-dimensional Monte-Carlo simulation procedure successfully used previously to account for flux measurements of protons, light nuclei, and electrons-positrons below the geomagnetic cutoff (satellite data), and of muons and antiprotons (balloon data). The calculated flux are compared with the experimental measurements from sea level uo to high float ballon altitudes. The agreement between data and simulation results are very good at all altitudes, including the lowest ones, where the calculations become extremely sensitive to the proton production cross section. The results are discussed in this context. The calculations are extended to the study of quasi trapped particles above the atmosphere to about 5 Earth radii, for prospective purpose.
  • Gamma-rays are, with antiprotons, a very efficient way to derive upper limits on the density of evaporating black holes. They have been successfully used in the last decades to severely constrain the amount of Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) in our Universe. This article suggests a little refinement, based on the expected background, to improve this limit by a factor of three. The resulting value is : Omega_PBH < 3.3E-9.
  • The atmospheric muon and neutrino flux have been simulated using the same approach which successfully accounted for the recent secondary proton, electron and positron flux measurements in orbit by the AMS experiment. For the muon flux, a good agreement is obtained with the CAPRICE and HEAT data for altitudes ranging from sea level up to about 38 km. The general features of the calculated atmospheric neutrino flux are reported and discussed. The flux obtained at the Super-Kamiokande experiment location are reported and compared with other calculations. For low neutrino energies the flux obtained is significantly smaller than that used in the data analysis of underground experiment. The simulation results for the SOUDAN experiment site are also reported.
  • A simple coalescence model based on the same diagrammatic approach of antimatter production in hadronic collisions as used previously for antideuterons is used here for the hadroproduction of mass 3 antinuclei. It is shown that the model is able to reproduce the existing experimental data on Tbar and 3hebar production without any additional parameter.
  • The secondary e+ and e- populations in near earth's orbit have been calculated by simulation. The results are in very good agreement with the recent AMS measurements. The e$^+$ over e$^-$ flux ratio for particles below the geomagnetic cutoff appears to be due to the geomagnetic East-West effect.
  • The possible sources of light nuclei populations observed recently below the geomagnetic cutoff by the AMS experiment are discussed in terms of nuclear processes: fragmentation of the incoming flux of cosmic helium on atmospheric nuclei, and nuclear coalescence from proton and helium induced reactions. Results of simulations for deuterium, tritium, helium 3 and 4, are presented.