• We use new and archival Chandra observations of Cygnus A, totalling $\sim$1.9 Ms, to investigate the distribution and temperature structure of gas lying within the projected extent of the cocoon shock and exhibiting a rib-like structure. We confirm that the X-rays are dominated by thermal emission with an average temperature of around 4 keV, and have discovered an asymmetry in the temperature gradient, with the southwestern part of the gas cooler than the rest by up to 2 keV. Pressure estimates suggest that the gas is a coherent structure of single origin located inside the cocoon, with a mass of roughly $2\times10^{10} M_{\odot}$. We conclude that the gas is debris resulting from disintegration of the cool core of the Cygnus A cluster after the passage of the jet during the early stages of the current epoch of activity. The 4 keV gas now lies on the central inside surface of the hotter cocoon rim. The temperature gradient could result from an offset between the centre of the cluster core and the Cygnus A host galaxy at the switch-on of current radio activity.
  • We present a new analysis of the widely used relation between cavity power and radio luminosity in clusters of galaxies with evidence for strong AGN feedback. We study the correlation at low radio frequencies using two new surveys - the First Alternative Data Release of the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS ADR1) at 148 MHz and LOFAR's first all-sky survey, the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) at 140 MHz. We find a scaling relation $P_{\rm cav} \propto L_{148}^{\beta}$, with a logarithmic slope of $\beta = 0.51 \pm 0.14$, which is in good agreement with previous results based on data at 327 MHz. The large scatter present in this correlation confirms the conclusion reached at higher frequencies that the total radio luminosity at a single frequency is a poor predictor of the total jet power. We show that including measurements at 148 MHz alone is insufficient to reliably compute the bolometric radio luminosity and reduce the scatter in the correlation. For a subset of four well-resolved sources, we examine the detected extended structures at low frequencies and compare with the morphology known from higher frequency images and Chandra X-ray maps. In Perseus we discuss details in the structures of the radio mini-halo, while in the 2A 0335+096 cluster we observe new diffuse emission associated with multiple X-ray cavities and likely originating from past activity. For A2199 and MS 0735.6+7421, we confirm that the observed low-frequency radio lobes are confined to the extents known from higher frequencies. This new low-frequency analysis highlights the fact that existing cavity power to radio luminosity relations are based on a relatively narrow range of AGN outburst ages. We discuss how the correlation could be extended using low frequency data from the LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) in combination with future, complementary deeper X-ray observations.
  • We describe a new tool for studying the structure and physical characteristics of ultracompact AGN jets and their surroundings with microarcsecond precision. This tool is based on the frequency dependence of the light curves observed for intra-day variable radio sources, where the variability is caused by interstellar scintillation. We apply this method to PKS1257-326 to resolve the core-shift as a function of frequency on scales well below ~12 microarcseconds. We find that the frequency dependence of the position of the scintillating component is r \propto \nu^{-0.1 \pm 0.24} (99% confidence interval) and the frequency dependence of the size of the scintillating component is d \propto \nu^{-0.64 \pm 0.006}. Together, these results imply that the jet opening angle increases with distance along the jet: d \propto r^{n_d}$ with n_d > 1.8. We show that the flaring of the jet, and flat frequency dependence of the core position is broadly consistent with a model in which the jet is hydrostatically confined and traversing a steep pressure gradient in the confining medium with p \propto r^{-n_p} and n_p > 7. Such steep pressure gradients have previously been suggested based on VLBI studies of the frequency dependent core shifts in AGN.
  • Recent results based on the analysis of radio galaxies and their hot X-ray emitting atmospheres suggest that non-radiating particles dominate the energy budget in the lobes of FRI radio galaxies, in some cases by a factor of more than 1000, while radiating particles dominate the energy budget in FRII radio galaxy lobes. This implies a significant difference in the radiative efficiency of the two morphological classes. To test this hypothesis, we have measured the kinetic energy flux for a sample of 3C FRII radio sources using a new method based on the observed parameters of the jet terminal hotspots, and compared the resulting Q(jet) - L(radio) relation to that obtained for FRI radio galaxies based on X-ray cavity measurements. Contrary to expectations, we find approximate agreement between the Q(jet) - L(radio) relations determined separately for FRI and FRII radio galaxies. This result is ostensibly difficult to reconcile with the emerging scenario in which the lobes of FRI and FRII radio galaxies have vastly different energy budgets. However, a combination of lower density environment, spectral ageing and strong shocks driven by powerful FRII radio galaxies may reduce the radiative efficiency of these objects relative to FRIs and couteract, to some extent, the higher radiative efficiency expected to arise due to the lower fraction of energy in non-radiating particles. An unexpected corollary is that extrapolating the Q(jet) - L(radio) relation determined for low power FRI radio galaxies provides a reasonable approximation for high power sources, despite their apparently different lobe compositions.
  • We present 18 GHz Australia Telescope Compact Array imaging of the Mpc-scale quasar jet PKS 0637-752 with angular resolution ~0.58 arcseconds. We draw attention to a spectacular train of quasi-periodic knots along the inner 11 arcseconds of the jet, with average separation ~1.1 arcsec (7.6 kpc projected). We consider two classes of model to explain the periodic knots: those that involve a static pattern through which the jet plasma travels (e.g. stationary shocks); and those that involve modulation of the jet engine. Interpreting the knots as re-confinement shocks implies the jet kinetic power Q ~ 10^{46} erg/s, but the constant knot separation along the jet is not expected in a realistic external density profile. For models involving modulation of the jet engine, we find that the required modulation period is 2 x 10^3 yr < \tau < 3 x 10^5 yr. The lower end of this range is applicable if the jet remains highly relativistic on kpc-scales, as implied by the IC/CMB model of jet X-ray emission. We suggest that the quasi-periodic jet structure in PKS 0637-752 may be analogous to the quasi-periodic jet modulation seen in the microquasar GRS 1915+105, believed to result from limit cycle behaviour in an unstable accretion disk. If variations in the accretion rate are driven by a binary black hole, the predicted orbital radius is 0.7 < a < 30 pc, which corresponds to a maximum angular separation of ~0.1 - 5 mas.
  • SN1957D, located in one of the spiral arms of M83, is one of the small number of extragalactic supernovae that has remained detectable at radio and optical wavelengths during the decades after its explosion. Here we report the first detection of SN1957D in X-rays, as part of a 729 ks observation of M83 with \chandra. The X-ray luminosity (0.3 - 8 keV) is 1.7 (+2.4,-0.3) 10**37 ergs/s. The spectrum is hard and highly self-absorbed compared to most sources in M83 and to other young supernova remnants, suggesting that the system is dominated at X-ray wavelengths by an energetic pulsar and its pulsar wind nebula. The high column density may be due to absorption within the SN ejecta. HST WFC3 images resolve the supernova remnant from the surrounding emission and the local star field. Photometry of stars around SN1957D, using WFC3 images, indicates an age of less than 10**7 years and a main sequence turnoff mass more than 17 solar masses. New spectra obtained with Gemini-South show that the optical spectrum continues to be dominated by broad [O III] emission lines, the signature of fast-moving SN ejecta. The width of the broad lines has remained about 2700 km/s (FWHM). The [O III] flux dropped precipitously between 1989 and 1991, but continued monitoring shows the flux has been almost constant since. In contrast, radio observations over the period 1990-2011 show a decline rate inf the flux proportional to t**-4, far steeper than the rate observed earlier, suggesting that the primary shock has overrun the edge of a pre-SN wind.
  • Preliminary specifications for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) call for 25% of the total collecting area of the dish array to be located at distances greater than 180 km from the core, with a maximum baseline of at least 3000 km. The array will provide angular resolution ~ 40 - 2 mas at 0.5 - 10 GHz with image sensitivity reaching < 50 nJy/beam in an 8 hour integration with 500 MHz bandwidth. Given these specifications, the high angular resolution component of the SKA will be capable of detecting brightness temperatures < 200 K with milliarcsecond-scale angular resolution. The aim of this article is to bring together in one place a discussion of the broad range of new and important high angular resolution science that will be enabled by the SKA, and in doing so, address the merits of long baselines as part of the SKA. We highlight the fact that high angular resolution requiring baselines greater than 1000 km provides a rich science case with projects from many areas of astrophysics, including important contributions to key SKA science.
  • Long Baseline Array imaging of the z=0.663 broad line radio galaxy PKS1421-490 reveals a 400 pc diameter high surface brightness hotspot at a projected distance of approximately 40kpc from the active galactic nucleus. The isotropic X-ray luminosity of the hotspot, L_{2-10 keV} = 3 10^{44} ergs/s, is comparable to the isotropic X-ray luminosity of the entire X-ray jet of PKS0637-752, and the peak radio surface brightness is hundreds of times greater than that of the brightest hotspot in Cygnus A. We model the radio to X-ray spectral energy distribution using a one-zone synchrotron self Compton model with a near equipartition magnetic field strength of 3 mG. There is a strong brightness asymmetry between the approaching and receding hotspots and the hot spot spectrum remains flat (alpha ~ 0.5) well beyond the predicted cooling break for a 3 mG magnetic field, indicating that the hotspot emission may be Doppler beamed. A high plasma velocity beyond the terminal jet shock could be the result of a dynamically important magnetic field in the jet. There is a change in the slope of the hotspot radio spectrum at GHz frequencies from alpha~0.5 to alpha<0.2, which we model by incorporating a cut-off in the electron energy distribution at gamma_{min} ~ 650, with higher values implied if the hotspot emission is Doppler beamed. We show that a sharp decrease in the electron number density below a Lorentz factor of 650 would arise from the dissipation of bulk kinetic energy in an electron/proton jet with a Lorentz factor Gamma_{jet} ~ 5.
  • We study the contents of an apparent void in the distribution of Ly-alpha emitting galaxies at redshift 2.38. We show that this void is not empty, but contains a damped Ly-alpha absorption-line system, seen in absorption against background QSO 2138-4427. Imaging does not reveal any galaxy associated with this absorption-line system, but it contains metals (Fe/H ~ -1.3), and its large velocity range (~ 180 km/s) implies a significant mass.