• The outer Galactic halo is home to a number of substructures which still have an uncertain origin, but most likely are remnants of former interactions between the Galaxy and its former satellites. Triangulum-Andromeda (TriAnd) is one of these halo substructures, found as an overdensity of 2MASS M giants. We analyzed the region of Triangulum-Andromeda using photometric data from the Ninth Data Release of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR9). By comparing the observations with simulations from the TRILEGAL Galactic model, we were able to identify and map several scattered overdensities of main sequence stars that seem to be associated with TriAnd over a large area covering $\sim 500$ deg$^2$. One of these excesses may represent a new stellar overdensity. We also briefly discuss an alternative hypothesis, according to which TriAnd is one of the troughs of oscillation rings in the Galactic disk.
  • Deciphering the assembly history of the Milky Way is a formidable task, which becomes possible only if one can produce high-resolution chrono-chemo-kinematical maps of the Galaxy. Data from large-scale astrometric and spectroscopic surveys will soon provide us with a well-defined view of the current chemo-kinematical structure of the Milky Way, but will only enable a blurred view on the temporal sequence that led to the present-day Galaxy. As demonstrated by the (ongoing) exploitation of data from the pioneering photometric missions CoRoT, Kepler, and K2, asteroseismology provides the way forward: solar-like oscillating giants are excellent evolutionary clocks thanks to the availability of seismic constraints on their mass and to the tight age-initial-mass relation they adhere to. In this paper we identify five key outstanding questions relating to the formation and evolution of the Milky Way that will need precise and accurate ages for large samples of stars to be addressed, and we identify the requirements in terms of number of targets and the precision on the stellar properties that are needed to tackle such questions. By quantifying the asteroseismic yields expected from PLATO for red-giant stars, we demonstrate that these requirements are within the capabilities of the current instrument design, provided that observations are sufficiently long to identify the evolutionary state and allow robust and precise determination of acoustic-mode frequencies. This will allow us to harvest data of sufficient quality to reach a 10% precision in age. This is a fundamental pre-requisite to then reach the more ambitious goal of a similar level of accuracy, which will only be possible if we have to hand a careful appraisal of systematic uncertainties on age deriving from our limited understanding of stellar physics, a goal which conveniently falls within the main aims of PLATO's core science.
  • Convective mixing in Helium-core-burning (HeCB) stars is one of the outstanding issues in stellar modelling. The precise asteroseismic measurements of gravity-modes period spacing ($\Delta\Pi_1$) has opened the door to detailed studies of the near-core structure of such stars, which had not been possible before. Here we provide stringent tests of various core-mixing scenarios against the largely unbiased population of red-clump stars belonging to the old open clusters monitored by Kepler, and by coupling the updated precise inference on $\Delta\Pi_1$ in thousands field stars with spectroscopic constraints. We find that models with moderate overshooting successfully reproduce the range observed of $\Delta\Pi_1$ in clusters. In particular we show that there is no evidence for the need to extend the size of the adiabatically stratified core, at least at the beginning of the HeCB phase. This conclusion is based primarily on ensemble studies of $\Delta\Pi_1$ as a function of mass and metallicity. While $\Delta\Pi_1$ shows no appreciable dependence on the mass, we have found a clear dependence of $\Delta\Pi_1$ on metallicity, which is also supported by predictions from models.
  • By means of the updated PARSEC database of evolutionary tracks of massive stars, we compute the integrated stellar light, the ionizing photon budget and the supernova rates of young simple stellar populations (SSPs), for different metallicities and IMF upper mass limits. Using CLOUDY we compute and include in the SSP spectra the neb- ular emission contribution. We also revisit the thermal and non-thermal radio emission contribution from young stars. Using GRASIL we can thus predict the panchromatic spectrum and the main recombination lines of any type of star-forming galaxy, including the effects of dust absorption and re-emission. We check the new models against the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of selected well-observed nearby galaxies. From the best-fit models we obtain a consistent set of star formation rate (SFR) calibrations at wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet (UV) to radio. We also provide analytical calibrations that take into account the dependence on metallcity and IMF upper mass limit of the SSPs. We show that the latter limit can be well constrained by combining information from the observed far infrared, 24 {\mu}m, 33 GHz and H{\alpha} luminosities. Another interesting property derived from the fits is that, while in a normal galaxy the attenuation in the lines is significantly higher than that in the nearby continuum, in individual star bursting regions they are similar, supporting the notion that this effect is due to an age selective extinction. Since in these conditions the Balmer decrement method may not be accurate, we provide relations to estimate the attenuation from the observed 24 {\mu}m or 33 GHz fluxes. These relations can be useful for the analysis of young high redshift galaxies.
  • With the advent of the space missions CoRoT and Kepler, it has become feasible to determine precise asteroseismic masses and ages for large samples of red-giant stars. In this paper, we present the CoRoGEE dataset -- obtained from CoRoT lightcurves for 606 red giant stars in two fields of the Galactic disc which have been co-observed for an ancillary project of APOGEE. We have used the Bayesian parameter estimation code PARAM to calculate distances, extinctions, masses, and ages for these stars in a homogeneous analysis, resulting in relative statistical uncertainties of $\sim2\%$ in distance, $\sim4\%$ in radius, $\sim9\%$ in mass and $\sim25\%$ in age. We also assess systematic age uncertainties due to different input physics and mass loss. We discuss the correlation between ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars over a large radial range of the Milky Way's disc (5 kpc $<R_{\rm Gal}<$ 14 kpc), focussing on the [$\alpha$/Fe]-[Fe/H]-age plane in five radial bins of the Galactic disc. We find an overall agreement with the expectations of chemical-evolution models computed before the present data were available, especially for the outer regions. However, our data also indicate that a significant fraction of stars now observed near and beyond the Solar Neighbourhood migrated from inner regions. Mock CoRoGEE observations of a chemo-dynamical Milky Way disc model show that the number of high-metallicity stars in the outer disc is too high to be accounted for even by the strong radial mixing present in the model. The mock observations also reveal that the age distribution of the [$\alpha$/Fe]-enhanced sequence in the CoRoGEE inner-disc field is much broader than expected from a combination of radial mixing and observational errors. We suggest that a thick disc/bulge component that formed stars for more than 3 Gyr may account for these discrepancies.
  • In a companion paper, we have presented the combined asteroseismic-spectroscopic dataset obtained from CoRoT lightcurves and APOGEE infra-red spectra for 678 solar-like oscillating red giants in two fields of the Galactic disc (CoRoGEE). We have measured chemical abundance patterns, distances, and ages of these field stars which are spread over a large radial range of the Milky Way's disc. Here we show how to simulate this dataset using a chemodynamical Galaxy model. We also demonstrate how the observation procedure influences the accuracy of our estimated ages.
  • We report the discovery of eight new Milky Way companions in ~1,800 deg^2 of optical imaging data collected during the first year of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Each system is identified as a statistically significant over-density of individual stars consistent with the expected isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor stellar population. The objects span a wide range of absolute magnitudes (M_V from -2.2 mag to -7.4 mag), physical sizes (10 pc to 170 pc), and heliocentric distances (30 kpc to 330 kpc). Based on the low surface brightnesses, large physical sizes, and/or large Galactocentric distances of these objects, several are likely to be new ultra-faint satellite galaxies of the Milky Way and/or Magellanic Clouds. We introduce a likelihood-based algorithm to search for and characterize stellar over-densities, as well as identify stars with high satellite membership probabilities. We also present completeness estimates for detecting ultra-faint galaxies of varying luminosities, sizes, and heliocentric distances in the first-year DES data.
  • We investigate the nature of the long-period radial velocity variations in Alpha Tau first reported over 20 years ago. We analyzed precise stellar radial velocity measurements for Alpha Tau spanning over 30 years. An examination of the Halpha and Ca II 8662 spectral lines, and Hipparcos photometry was also done to help discern the nature of the long-period radial velocity variations. Our radial velocity data show that the long-period, low amplitude radial velocity variations are long-lived and coherent. Furthermore, Halpha equivalent width measurements and Hipparcos photometry show no significant variations with this period. Another investigation of this star established that there was no variability in the spectral line shapes with the radial velocity period. An orbital solution results in a period of P = 628.96 +/- 0.90 d, eccentricity, e = 0.10 +/- 0.05, and a radial velocity amplitude, K = 142.1 +/- 7.2 m/s. Evolutionary tracks yield a stellar mass of 1.13 +/- 0.11 M_sun, which corresponds to a minimum companion mass of 6.47 +/- 0.53 M_Jup with an orbital semi-major axis of a = 1.46 +/- 0.27 AU. After removing the orbital motion of the companion, an additional period of ~ 520 d is found in the radial velocity data, but only in some time spans. A similar period is found in the variations in the equivalent width of Halpha and Ca II. Variations at one-third of this period are also found in the spectral line bisector measurements. The 520 d period is interpreted as the rotation modulation by stellar surface structure. Its presence, however, may not be long-lived, and it only appears in epochs of the radial velocity data separated by $\sim$ 10 years. This might be due to an activity cycle. The data presented here provide further evidence of a planetary companion to Alpha Tau, as well as activity-related radial velocity variations.
  • Context. The availability of asteroseismic constraints for a large sample of red giant stars from the CoRoT and Kepler missions paves the way for various statistical studies of the seismic properties of stellar populations. Aims. We use the first detailed spectroscopic study of 19 CoRoT red-giant stars (Morel et al 2014) to compare theoretical stellar evolution models to observations of the open cluster NGC 6633 and field stars. Methods. In order to explore the effects of rotation-induced mixing and thermohaline instability, we compare surface abundances of carbon isotopic ratio and lithium with stellar evolution predictions. These chemicals are sensitive to extra-mixing on the red-giant branch. Results. We estimate mass, radius, and distance for each star using the seismic constraints. We note that the Hipparcos and seismic distances are different. However, the uncertainties are such that this may not be significant. Although the seismic distances for the cluster members are self consistent they are somewhat larger than the Hipparcos distance. This is an issue that should be considered elsewhere. Models including thermohaline instability and rotation-induced mixing, together with the seismically determined masses can explain the chemical properties of red-giants targets. However, with this sample of stars we cannot perform stringent tests of the current stellar models. Tighter constraints on the physics of the models would require the measurement of the core and surface rotation rates, and of the period spacing of gravity-dominated mixed modes. A larger number of stars with longer times series, as provided by Kepler or expected with Plato, would help for ensemble asteroseismology.
  • We report the discovery of a group of apparently young CoRoT red-giant stars exhibiting enhanced [alpha/Fe] abundance ratios (as determined from APOGEE spectra) with respect to Solar values. Their existence is not explained by standard chemical evolution models of the Milky Way, and shows that the chemical-enrichment history of the Galactic disc is more complex. We find similar stars in previously published samples for which isochrone-ages could be robustly obtained, although in smaller relative numbers, which could explain why these stars have not received prior attention. The young [alpha/Fe]-rich stars are much more numerous in the CoRoT-APOGEE (CoRoGEE) inner-field sample than in any other high-resolution sample available at present, as only CoRoGEE can explore the inner-disc regions and provide ages for its field stars. The kinematic properties of the young [$\alpha$/Fe]-rich stars are not clearly thick-disc like, despite their rather large distances from the Galactic mid-plane. Our tentative interpretation of these and previous intriguing observations in the Milky Way is that these stars were formed close to the end of the Galactic bar, near corotation -- a region where gas can be kept inert for longer times, compared to other regions shocked more frequently by the passage of spiral arms. Moreover, that is where the mass return from older inner-disc stellar generations should be maximal (according to an inside-out disc-formation scenario), further diluting the in-situ gas. Other possibilities to explain these observations (e.g., a recent gas-accretion event) are also discussed.
  • The Dark Energy Camera has captured a large set of images as part of Science Verification (SV) for the Dark Energy Survey. The SV footprint covers a lar ge portion of the outer Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), providing photometry 1.5 magnitudes fainter than the main sequence turn-off of the oldest LMC stel lar population. We derive geometrical and structural parameters for various stellar populations in the LMC disk. For the distribution of all LMC stars, we find an inclination of $i=-38.14^{\circ}\pm0.08^{\circ}$ (near side in the North) and a position angle for the line of nodes of $\theta_0=129.51^{\circ}\pm0.17^{\circ}$. We find that stars younger than $\sim 4$ Gyr are more centrally concentrated than older stars. Fitting a projected exponential disk shows that the scale radius of the old populations is $R_{>4 Gyr}=1.41\pm0.01$ kpc, while the younger population has $R_{<4 Gyr}=0.72\pm0.01$ kpc. Howe ver, the spatial distribution of the younger population deviates significantly from the projected exponential disk model. The distribution of old stars suggests a large truncation radius of $R_{t}=13.5\pm0.8$ kpc. If this truncation is dominated by the tidal field of the Galaxy, we find that the LMC is $\simeq 24^{+9}_{-6}$ times less massive than the encircled Galactic mass. By measuring the Red Clump peak magnitude and comparing with the best-fit LM C disk model, we find that the LMC disk is warped and thicker in the outer regions north of the LMC centre. Our findings may either be interpreted as a warped and flared disk in the LMC outskirts, or as evidence of a spheroidal halo component
  • The VISTA near-infrared YJKs survey of the Magellanic Clouds system (VMC) has entered its core phase: about 40% of the observations across the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC), the Magellanic Bridge and Stream have already been secured and the data are processed and analysed regularly. The initial analyses, concentrated in the first two completed tiles in the LMC (6_6 including 30 Doradus and 8_8 including the South Ecliptic Pole), show the superior quality of the data. The depth of the VMC survey allows the derivation of the star formation history (SFH) with unprecedented quality compared to previous wide-area surveys while reddening maps of high angular resolution are constructed using red clump stars. The multi-epoch Ks-band data reveal tight period-luminosity relations for variable stars and they permit the measurement of accurate proper motions of the stellar populations. The VMC survey continues to acquire data that will address many issues in the field of star and galaxy evolution.
  • Young, nearby stars are ideal targets to search for planets using the direct imaging technique. The determination of stellar parameters is crucial for the interpretation of imaging survey results particularly since the luminosity of substellar objects has a strong dependence on system age. We have conducted a large program with NaCo at the VLT in order to search for planets and brown dwarfs in wide orbits around 86 stars. A large fraction of the targets observed with NaCo were poorly investigated in the literature. We performed a study to characterize the fundamental properties (age, distance, mass) of the stars in our sample. To improve target age determinations, we compiled and analyzed a complete set of age diagnostics. We measured spectroscopic parameters and age diagnostics using dedicated observations acquired with FEROS and CORALIE spectrographs at La Silla Observatory. We also made extensive use of archival spectroscopic data and results available in the literature. Additionally, we exploited photometric time-series, available in ASAS and Super-WASP archives, to derive rotation period for a large fraction of our program stars. We provided updated characterization of all the targets observed in the VLT NaCo Large program, a survey designed to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs in wide orbits. The median distance and age of our program stars are 64 pc and 100 Myr, respectively. Nearly all the stars have masses between 0.70 and 1.50sun, with a median value of 1.01 Msun. The typical metallicity is close to solar, with a dispersion that is smaller than that of samples usually observed in radial velocity surveys. Several stars are confirmed or proposed here to be members of nearby young moving groups. Eight spectroscopic binaries are identified.
  • Asteroseismology may in principle be used to detect unresolved stellar binary systems comprised of solar-type stars and/or red giants. This novel method relies on the detection of the presence of two solar-like oscillation spectra in the frequency spectrum of a single lightcurve. Here, we make predictions of the numbers of systems that may be detectable in data already collected by the NASA Kepler Mission. Our predictions, which are based upon TRILEGAL and BiSEPS simulations of the Kepler field of view, indicate that as many as 200 or more ``asteroseismic binaries'' may be detectable in this manner. Most of these binaries should be comprised of two He-core-burning red giants. Owing largely to the limited numbers of targets with the requisite short-cadence Kepler data, we expect only a small number of detected binaries containing solar-type stars. The predicted yield of detections is sensitive to the assumed initial mass ratio distribution of the binary components and therefore represents a sensitive calibration of the much debated initial mass ratio distribution near mass ratio unity.
  • We investigate the chemo-kinematic properties of the Milky Way disc by exploring the first year of data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and compare our results to smaller optical high-resolution samples in the literature, as well as results from lower resolution surveys such as GCS, SEGUE and RAVE. We start by selecting a high-quality sample in terms of chemistry ($\sim$ 20.000 stars) and, after computing distances and orbital parameters for this sample, we employ a number of useful subsets to formulate constraints on Galactic chemical and chemodynamical evolution processes in the Solar neighbourhood and beyond (e.g., metallicity distributions -- MDFs, [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams, and abundance gradients). Our red giant sample spans distances as large as 10 kpc from the Sun. We find remarkable agreement between the recently published local (d $<$ 100 pc) high-resolution high-S/N HARPS sample and our local HQ sample (d $<$ 1 kpc). The local MDF peaks slightly below solar metallicity, and exhibits an extended tail towards [Fe/H] $= -$1, whereas a sharper cut-off is seen at larger metallicities. The APOGEE data also confirm the existence of a gap in the [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] abundance diagram. When expanding our sample to cover three different Galactocentric distance bins, we find the high-[$\alpha$/Fe] stars to be rare towards the outer zones, as previously suggested in the literature. For the gradients in [Fe/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe], measured over a range of 6 $ < $ R $ <$ 11 kpc in Galactocentric distance, we find a good agreement with the gradients traced by the GCS and RAVE dwarf samples. For stars with 1.5 $<$ z $<$ 3 kpc, we find a positive metallicity gradient and a negative gradient in [$\alpha$/Fe].
  • We use multi-epoch near-infrared observations from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Cloud system (VMC) to measure the proper motion of stars of the LMC, in one tile of 1.5 deg^2 centred at (alpha, delta) = (05:59:23.136, -66:20:28.68) and including the South Ecliptic Pole, with respect to their 2MASS position over a time baseline of ~10 years and from VMC observations only, spanning a time range of ~1 year. Stars of different ages are selected from the (J-Ks) vs. Ks diagram and their average coordinate displacement is computed from the difference between Ks band observations for stars as faint as Ks=19 mag. Proper motions are derived by averaging up to seven 2MASS-VMC combinations in the first case and from the slope of the best fit line among the seven VMC epochs in the second case. Separate proper motion values are obtained for variable stars in the field. The proper motion of ~40,000 LMC stars in the tile, with respect to ~8000 background galaxies, obtained from VMC data alone, is mu_alpha cos(delta) = +2.20+/-0.06 (stat) +/-0.29 (sys) and mu_delta = +1.70+/-0.06 (stat) +/-0.30 (sys) mas/yr. This value agrees with recent ground-based determinations in a nearby field but is larger than studies with the HST; the cause of this discrepancy may be due to additional systematic errors in the data. The LMC proper motion is also clearly distinct from the proper motion derived for stars of the Milky Way. The relative proper motion between the foreground stars and the LMC stars is ~5 mas/yr. Furthermore, we measure a decrease of the proper motion with increasing logarithm of stellar age for LMC stars. This study, based on just one VMC tile, shows the potential of the 2MASS-VMC and VMC-VMC combinations for a comprehensive investigation of the proper motion across the Magellanic system. (Abridged)
  • The VMC survey is obtaining multi-epoch photometry in the Ks band of the Magellanic System down to a limiting magnitude of Ks ~ 19.3 for individual epoch data. The observations are spaced in time such as to provide optimal sampling of the light curves for RR Lyrae stars and for Cepheids with periods up to 20-30 days. We present examples of the Ks-band light curves of Classical Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars we are obtaining from the VMC data and outline the strategy we put in place to measure distances and infer the System three-dimensional geometry from the variable stars. For this purpose the near-infrared Period-Luminosity, Period-Wesenheit, and Period-Luminosity-Colour relations of the system RR Lyrae stars and Cepheids are used. We extensively exploit the catalogues of the Magellanic Clouds' variable stars provided by the EROS-2 and OGLE III/IV microlensing surveys. By combining these surveys we present the currently widest-area view of the Large Magellanic Cloud as captured by the galaxy Cepheids, RR Lyrae stars and binaries. This reveals the full extent of the main structures (bar/s - spiral arms) that have only been vaguely guessed before. Our work strengthens the case for a detailed study of the Large Magellanic Cloud three-dimensional geometry.
  • The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of ~100,000 red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.
  • We use medium-band near-infrared (NIR) Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 photometry with model NIR spectra of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to develop a new tool for efficiently distinguishing carbon-rich (C-type) AGB stars from oxygen-rich (M-type) AGB stars in galaxies at the edge of and outside the Local Group. We present the results of a test of this method on a region of the inner disk of M31, where we find a surprising lack of C stars, contrary to the findings of previous C star searches in other regions of M31. We find only 1 candidate C star (plus up to 6 additional, less certain C stars candidates), resulting in an extremely low ratio of C to M stars (C/M = (3.3(+20,-0.1))x10^-4) that is 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than other C/M estimates in M31. The low C/M ratio is likely due to the high metallicity in this region which impedes stars from achieving C/O > 1 in their atmospheres. These observations provide stringent constraints evolutionary models of metal-rich AGB stars and suggest that there is a metallicity threshold above which M stars are unable to make the transition to C stars, dramatically affecting AGB mass loss and dust production and, consequently, the observed global properties of metal-rich galaxies.
  • Context: The details of how galaxies have evolved are imprinted in their star formation history, chemical enrichment and morpho-kinematic structure. Parameters behind these can be measured by combining photometric techniques with modelling. However, there are uncertainties from the ambiguity of colour and magnitude and the effects of interstellar reddening. Aims: In this paper we present a detailed reddening map of the central 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud; for community use and to test the methods used. The reddening, a measurement of dust extinction, acts as a tracer of the interstellar medium (ISM). Methods: Near infrared photometry of red clump stars are used to measure reddening as extinction is the main cause of their colour and magnitude variance. The star formation history is used to convert colour to reddening values which are subsequently converted to visual extinction. Results: Presented is a dust map for the 30 Doradus field. This map samples a region of 1x1.5 deg, containing ~1.5x10^5 red clump stars which probe reddening up to AV=6 mag. We compare our map with maps from the literature, including optical extinction maps and radio, mid- and far-infrared maps of atomic hydrogen and dust emission. Through estimation of column density we locate molecular clouds. Conclusions: This new reddening map shows correlation with equivalent maps in the literature, validating the method of red clump star selection. We make our reddening map available for community use. In terms of ISM the red clump stars appear to be more affected by the cooler dust measured by 70 micron emission because there is stronger correlation between increasing emission and extinction due to red clump stars not being located near hot stars that would heat the dust. The transition from atomic hydrogen to molecular hydrogen occurs between densities of NH=4x10^21 to 6x10^21 cm^-2.
  • Solar-like oscillating giants observed by the space-borne satellites CoRoT and Kepler can be used as key tracers of stellar populations in the Milky Way. When combined with additional photometric/spectroscopic constraints, the pulsation spectra of solar-like oscillating giant stars not only reveal their radii, and hence distances, but also provide well-constrained estimates of their masses, which can be used as proxies for the ages of these evolved stars. In this contribution we provide supplementary material to the comparison we presented in Miglio et al. (2013) between populations of giants observed by CoRoT in the fields designated LRc01 and LRa01.
  • Our understanding of how the Galaxy was formed and evolves is severely hampered by the lack of precise constraints on basic stellar properties such as distances, masses, and ages. Here, we show that solar-like pulsating red giants represent a well-populated class of accurate distance indicators, spanning a large age range, which can be used to map and date the Galactic disc in the regions probed by observations made by the CoRoT and Kepler space telescopes. When combined with photometric constraints, the pulsation spectra of such evolved stars not only reveal their radii, and hence distances, but also provide well-constrained estimates of their masses, which are reliable proxies for the ages of the stars. As a first application we consider red giants observed by CoRoT in two different parts of the Milky Way, and determine precise distances for ~2000 stars spread across nearly 15,000 pc of the Galactic disc, exploring regions which are a long way from the solar neighbourhood. We find significant differences in the mass distributions of these two samples which, by comparison with predictions of synthetic models of the Milky Way, we interpret as mainly due to the vertical gradient in the distribution of stellar masses (hence ages) in the disc. In the future, the availability of spectroscopic constraints for this sample of stars will not only improve the age determination, but also provide crucial constraints on age-velocity and age-metallicity relations at different Galactocentric radii and heights from the plane.
  • We present the updated version of the code used to compute stellar evolutionary tracks in Padova. It is the result of a thorough revision of the major input physics, together with the inclusion of the pre-main sequence phase, not present in our previous releases of stellar models. Another innovative aspect is the possibility of promptly generating accurate opacity tables fully consistent with any selected initial chemical composition, by coupling the OPAL opacity data at high temperatures to the molecular opacities computed with our AESOPUS code (Marigo & Aringer 2009). In this work we present extended sets of stellar evolutionary models for various initial chemical compositions, while other sets with different metallicities and/or different distributions of heavy elements are being computed. For the present release of models we adopt the solar distribution of heavy elements from the recent revision by Caffau et al. (2011), corresponding to a Sun's metallicity Z=0.0152. From all computed sets of stellar tracks, we also derive isochrones in several photometric systems. The aim is to provide the community with the basic tools to model star clusters and galaxies by means of population synthesis techniques.
  • The VISTA Magellanic Cloud (VMC, PI M.R. Cioni) survey is collecting deep Ks-band time-series photometry of the pulsating variable stars hosted by the system formed by the two Magellanic Clouds (MCs) and the "bridge" connecting them. In this paper we present the first results for Classical Cepheids, from the VMC observations of two fields in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The VMC Ks-band light curves of the Cepheids are well sampled (12-epochs) and of excellent precision. We were able to measure for the first time the Ks magnitude of the faintest Classical Cepheids in the LMC (Ks\sim17.5 mag), which are mostly pulsating in the First Overtone (FO) mode, and to obtain FO Period-Luminosity (PL), Period-Wesenheit (PW), and Period-Luminosity-Color (PLC) relations, spanning the full period range from 0.25 to 6 day. Since the longest period Cepheid in our dataset has a variability period of 23 day, we have complemented our sample with literature data for brighter F Cepheids. On this basis we have built a PL relation in the Ks band that, for the first time, includes short period pulsators, and spans the whole range from 1.6 to 100 days in period. We also provide the first ever empirical PW and PLC relations using the (V-Ks) color and time-series Ks photometry. The very small dispersion (\sim0.07 mag) of these relations makes them very well suited to study the three-dimensional (3D) geometry of the Magellanic system. The use of "direct" (parallax- and Baade-Wesselink- based) distance measurements to both Galactic and LMC Cepheids, allowed us to calibrate the zero points of the PL, PW, and PLC relations obtained in this paper, and in turn to estimate an absolute distance modulus of (m-M)0=18.46\pm0.03 for the LMC. This result is in agreement with most of the latest literature determinations based on Classical Cepheids.
  • The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is an on-going HST Multicycle Treasury program to image ~1/3 of M31's star forming disk in 6 filters, from the UV to the NIR. The full survey will resolve the galaxy into more than 100 million stars with projected radii from 0-20 kpc over a contiguous 0.5 square degree area in 828 orbits, producing imaging in the F275W and F336W filters with WFC3/UVIS, F475W and F814W with ACS/WFC, and F110W and F160W with WFC3/IR. The resulting wavelength coverage gives excellent constraints on stellar temperature, bolometric luminosity, and extinction for most spectral types. The photometry reaches SNR=4 at F275W=25.1, F336W=24.9, F475W=27.9, F814W=27.1, F110W=25.5, and F160W=24.6 for single pointings in the uncrowded outer disk; however, the optical and NIR data are crowding limited, and the deepest reliable magnitudes are up to 5 magnitudes brighter in the inner bulge. All pointings are dithered and produce Nyquist-sampled images in F475W, F814W, and F160W. We describe the observing strategy, photometry, astrometry, and data products, along with extensive tests of photometric stability, crowding errors, spatially-dependent photometric biases, and telescope pointing control. We report on initial fits to the structure of M31's disk, derived from the density of RGB stars, in a way that is independent of the assumed M/L and is robust to variations in dust extinction. These fits also show that the 10 kpc ring is not just a region of enhanced recent star formation, but is instead a dynamical structure containing a significant overdensity of stars with ages >1 Gyr. (Abridged)