• We present key results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS): spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and model fits of 330 young stellar objects, predominantly protostars, in the Orion molecular clouds. This is the largest sample of protostars studied in a single, nearby star-formation complex. With near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and sub-millimeter photometry from APEX, our SEDs cover 1.2-870 $\mu$m and sample the peak of the protostellar envelope emission at ~100 $\mu$m. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, we classify our sample into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II pre-main-sequence stars. We implement a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30400 model SEDs and use it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar. We argue that far-IR data are essential for accurate constraints on protostellar envelope properties. We find that most protostars, and in particular the flat-spectrum sources, are well-fit. The median envelope density and median inclination angle decrease from Class 0 to Class I to flat-spectrum protostars, despite the broad range in best-fit parameters in each of the three categories. We also discuss degeneracies in our model parameters. Our results confirm that the different protostellar classes generally correspond to an evolutionary sequence with a decreasing envelope infall rate, but the inclination angle also plays a role in the appearance, and thus interpretation, of the SEDs.
  • We present a near-IR survey for the visual multiples in the Orion molecular clouds region at separations between 100 and 1000 AU. These data were acquired at 1.6~$\mu$m with the NICMOS and WFC3 cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope. Additional photometry was obtained for some of the sources at 2.05~$\mu$m with NICMOS and in the $L'$-band with NSFCAM2 on the IRTF. Towards 129 protostars and 197 pre-main sequence stars with disks observed with WFC3, we detect 21 and 28 candidate companions between the projected separations of 100---1000 AU, of which less than 5 and 8, respectively, are chance line of sight coincidences. The resulting companion fraction ($CF$) after the correction for the line of sight contamination is 14.4$^{+1.1}_{-1.3}$% for protostars and 12.5$^{+1.2}_{-0.8}$% for the pre-main sequence stars. These values are similar to those found for main sequence stars, suggesting that there is little variation in the $CF$ with evolution, although several observational biases may mask a decrease in the $CF$ from protostars to the main sequence stars. After segregating the sample into two populations based on the surrounding surface density of YSOs, we find that the $CF$ in the high stellar density regions ($\Sigma_{YSO} > 45$~pc$^{-2}$) is approximately 50% higher than that found in the low stellar density regions ($\Sigma_{YSO} < 45$~pc$^{-2}$). We interpret this as evidence for the elevated formation of companions at 100 to 1000 AU in the denser environments of Orion. We discuss possible reasons for this elevated formation.
  • We analyze the spatial distribution of dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) identified in the Spitzer Survey of the Orion Molecular clouds, augmenting these data with Chandra X-ray observations to correct for incompleteness in dense clustered regions. We also devise a scheme to correct for spatially varying incompleteness when X-ray data are not available. The local surface densities of the YSOs range from 1 pc$^{-2}$ to over 10,000 pc$^{-2}$, with protostars tending to be in higher density regions. This range of densities is similar to other surveyed molecular clouds with clusters, but broader than clouds without clusters. By identifying clusters and groups as continuous regions with surface densities $\ge10$ pc$^{-2}$, we find that 59% of the YSOs are in the largest cluster, the Orion Nebular Cluster (ONC), while 13% of the YSOs are found in a distributed population. A lower fraction of protostars in the distributed population is evidence that it is somewhat older than the groups and clusters. An examination of the structural properties of the clusters and groups show that the peak surface densities of the clusters increase approximately linearly with the number of members. Furthermore, all clusters with more than 70 members exhibit asymmetric and/or highly elongated structures. The ONC becomes azimuthally symmetric in the inner 0.1 pc, suggesting that the cluster is only $\sim 2$ Myr in age. We find the star formation efficiency (SFE) of the Orion B cloud is unusually low, and that the SFEs of individual groups and clusters are an order of magnitude higher than those of the clouds. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the young low mass stars in the Orion clouds and the Orion OB 1 association, and we determine upper limits to the fraction of disks that may be affected by UV radiation from OB stars or by dynamical interactions in dense, clustered regions.
  • We give an explicit formula for the $L^2$ analytic torsion of the finite metric cone over an oriented compact connected Riemannian manifold. We provide an interpretation of the different factors appearing in this formula. We prove that the analytic torsion of the cone is the finite part of the limit obtained collapsing one of the boundaries, of the ratio of the analytic torsion of the frustum to a regularising factor. We show that the regularising factor comes from the set of the non square integrable eigenfunctions of the Laplace Beltrami operator on the cone.
  • The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best-fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, 2-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe)=0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10^(-8) to 10^(-10) Msol/yr, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from 3 to 0.5 microns. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1x10^(-4) of the ISM value, while the midplane is enhanced to 8 times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 micron silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.
  • Using NASA IRTF SpeX data from 0.8 to 4.5 $\mu$m, we determine self-consistently the stellar properties and excess emission above the photosphere for a sample of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) in the Taurus molecular cloud with varying degrees of accretion. This process uses a combination of techniques from the recent literature as well as observations of weak-line T Tauri stars (WTTS) to account for the differences in surface gravity and chromospheric activity between the TTS and dwarfs, which are typically used as photospheric templates for CTTS. Our improved veiling and extinction estimates for our targets allow us to extract flux-calibrated spectra of the excess in the near-infrared. We find that we are able to produce an acceptable parametric fit to the near-infrared excesses using a combination of up to three blackbodies. In half of our sample, two blackbodies at temperatures of 8000 K and 1600 K suffice. These temperatures and the corresponding solid angles are consistent with emission from the accretion shock on the stellar surface and the inner dust sublimation rim of the disk, respectively. In contrast, the other half requires three blackbodies at 8000, 1800, and 800 K, to describe the excess. We interpret the combined two cooler blackbodies as the dust sublimation wall with either a contribution from the disk surface beyond the wall or curvature of the wall itself, neither of which should have single-temperature blackbody emission. In these fits, we find no evidence of a contribution from optically thick gas inside the inner dust rim.
  • High-energy radiation from T Tauri stars (TTS) influences the amount and longevity of gas in disks, thereby playing a crucial role in the creation of gas giant planets. Here we probe the high-energy ionizing radiation from TTS using high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer IRS Neon forbidden line detections in a sample of disks from IC 348, NGC 2068, and Chamaeleon. We report three new detections of [Ne III] from CS Cha, SZ Cha, and T 54, doubling the known number of [Ne III] detections from TTS. Using [Ne III]-to-[Ne II] ratios in conjunction with X-ray emission measurements, we probe high-energy radiation from TTS. The majority of previously inferred [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios based on [Ne III] line upper limits are significantly less than 1, pointing to the dominance of either X-ray radiation or soft Extreme-Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in producing these lines. Here we report the first observational evidence for hard EUV dominated Ne forbidden line production in a T Tauri disk: [Ne III]/[Ne II]~1 in SZ Cha. Our results provide a unique insight into the EUV emission from TTS, by suggesting that EUV radiation may dominate the creation of Ne forbidden lines, albeit in a minority of cases.
  • We present a survey of the Orion A and B molecular clouds undertaken with the IRAC and MIPS instruments onboard Spitzer. In total, five distinct fields were mapped covering 9 sq. degrees in five mid-IR bands spanning 3-24 microns. The survey includes the Orion Nebula Cluster, the Lynds 1641, 1630 and 1622 dark clouds, and the NGC 2023, 2024, 2068 and 2071 nebulae. These data are merged with the 2MASS point source catalog to generate a catalog of eight band photometry. We identify 3479 dusty young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Orion molecular clouds by searching for point sources with mid-IR colors indicative of reprocessed light from dusty disks or infalling envelopes. The YSOs are subsequently classified on the basis of their mid-IR colors and their spatial distributions are presented. We classify 2991 of the YSOs as pre-main sequence stars with disks and 488 as likely protostars. Most of the sources were observed with IRAC in 2-3 epochs over 6 months; we search for variability between the epochs by looking for correlated variability in the 3.6 and 4.5 micron bands. We find that 50% of the dusty YSOs show variability. The variations are typically small (0.2 mag.) with the protostars showing a higher incidence of variability and larger variations. The observed correlations between the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8 micron variability suggests that we are observing variations in the heating of the inner disk due to changes in the accretion luminosity or rotating accretion hot spots.
  • Transitional circumstellar disks around young stellar objects have a distinctive infrared deficit around 10 microns in their Spectral Energy Distributions (SED), recently measured by the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), suggesting dust depletion in the inner regions. These disks have been confirmed to have giant central cavities by imaging of the submillimeter (sub-mm) continuum emission using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). However, the polarized near-infrared scattered light images for most objects in a systematic IRS/SMA cross sample, obtained by HiCIAO on the Subaru telescope, show no evidence for the cavity, in clear contrast with SMA and Spitzer observations. Radiative transfer modeling indicates that many of these scattered light images are consistent with a smooth spatial distribution for micron-sized grains, with little discontinuity in the surface density of the micron-sized grains at the cavity edge. Here we present a generic disk model that can simultaneously account for the general features in IRS, SMA, and Subaru observations. Particularly, the scattered light images for this model are computed, which agree with the general trend seen in Subaru data. Decoupling between the spatial distributions of the micron-sized dust and mm-sized dust inside the cavity is suggested by the model, which, if confirmed, necessitates a mechanism, such as dust filtration, for differentiating the small and big dust in the cavity clearing process. Our model also suggests an inwardly increasing gas-to-dust-ratio in the inner disk, and different spatial distributions for the small dust inside and outside the cavity, echoing the predictions in grain coagulation and growth models.
  • We present applications of the renormalization algorithm with graph enhancement (RAGE). This analysis extends the algorithms and applications given for approaches based on matrix product states introduced in [Phys. Rev. A 79, 022317 (2009)] to other tensor-network states such as the tensor tree states (TTS) and projected entangled pair states (PEPS). We investigate the suitability of the bare TTS to describe ground states, showing that the description of certain graph states and condensed matter models improves. We investigate graph-enhanced tensor-network states, demonstrating that in some cases (disturbed graph states and for certain quantum circuits) the combination of weighted graph states with tensor tree states can greatly improve the accuracy of the description of ground states and time evolved states. We comment on delineating the boundary of the classically efficiently simulatable states of quantum many-body systems.
  • We present IRAC/MIPS Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the solar type and the low mass stellar population of the young (~5 Myr) Lambda Orionis cluster. Combining optical and 2MASS photometry, we identify 436 stars as probable members of the cluster. Given the distance (450 pc) and the age of the cluster, our sample ranges in mass from 2 solar mass to objects below the substellar limit. With the addition of the Spitzer mid-infrared data, we have identified 49 stars bearing disks in the stellar cluster. Using spectral energy distribution (SED) slopes, we place objects in several classes: non-excess stars (diskless), stars with optically thick disks, stars with ``evolved disks''( with smaller excesses than optically thick disk systems), and ``transitional disks'' candidates (in which the inner disk is partially or fully cleared). The disk fraction depends on the stellar mass, ranging from ~6% for K type stars (Rc-J<2) to ~27% for stars with spectral type M5 or later (Rc-J>4). We confirm the dependence of disk fraction on stellar mass in this age range found in other studies. Regarding clustering levels, the overall fraction of disks in the Lambda Orionis cluster is similar to those reported in other stellar groups with ages normally quoted as ~5 Myr.
  • Spectral observations of classical T Tauri stars show a wide range of line profiles, many of which reveal signs of matter inflow and outflow. Halpha is the most commonly observed line profile due to its intensity, and it is highly dependent on the characteristics of the surrounding environment of these stars. Our aim is to analyze how the Halpha line profile is affected by the various parameters of our model which contains both the magnetospheric and disk wind contributions to the Halpha flux. We used a dipolar axisymmetric stellar magnetic field to model the stellar magnetosphere and a modified Blandford & Payne model was used in our disk wind region. A three-level atom with continuum was used to calculate the required Hydrogen level populations. We use the Sobolev approximation and a ray-by-ray method to calculate the integrated line profile. Through an extensive study of the model parameter space, we have investigated the contribution of many of the model parameters on the calculated line profiles. Our results show that the Halpha line is strongly dependent on the densities and temperatures inside the magnetosphere and the disk wind region. The bulk of the flux comes, most of the time, from the magnetospheric component for standard classical T Tauri stars parameters, but the disk wind contribution becomes more important as the mass accretion rate, the temperatures and densities inside the disk wind increase. We have also found that most of the disk wind contribution to the Halpha line is emitted at the innermost region of the disk wind. Models that take into consideration both inflow and outflow of matter are a necessity to fully understand and describe classical T Tauri stars.
  • We have analyzed nearly all images of the Taurus star-forming region at 3.6-24um that were obtained during the cryogenic mission of the Spitzer Space Telescope (46 deg^2) and have measured photometry for all known members of the region that are within these data, corresponding to 348 sources. We have classified the members of Taurus according to whether they show evidence of disks and envelopes (classes I, II, and III). The disk fraction in Taurus is 75% for solar-mass stars and declines to 45% for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs (0.01-0.3 M_sun). This dependence on stellar mass is similar to that measured for Cha I, although the disk fraction in Taurus is slightly higher overall, probably because of its younger age (1 vs. 2-3 Myr). In comparison, the disk fraction for solar-mass stars is much lower (20%) in IC 348 and Sigma Ori, which are denser than Taurus and Cha I and are roughly coeval with the latter. These data indicate that disk lifetimes for solar-mass stars are longer in regions that have lower stellar densities. Through an analysis of multiple epochs of photometry that are available for ~200 Taurus members, we find that stars with disks exhibit significantly greater mid-IR variability than diskless stars. Finally, we have used our data in Taurus to refine the criteria for primordial, evolved, and transitional disks. The number ratio of evolved and transitional disks to primordial disks in Taurus is 15/98 for K5-M5, indicating a timescale of 0.15 x tau(primordial)=0.45 Myr for the clearing of the inner regions of optically thick disks. After applying the same criteria to older clusters (2-10 Myr), we find that the proportions of evolved and transitional disks in those populations are consistent with the measurements in Taurus when their star formation histories are properly taken into account. ERRATUM: In Table 7, we inadvertently omitted the spectral type bins in which class II sources were placed in Table 8 based on their bolometric luminosities (applies only to stars that lack spectroscopic classifications). The bins were K6-M3.5 for FT Tau, DK Tau B, and IRAS 04370+2559, M3.5-M6 for IRAS 04200+2759, IT Tau B, and ITG 1, and M6-M8 for IRAS 04325+2402 C. In addition, the values of K_s-[3.6] in Table 13 and Figure 26 for spectral types of M4-M9 are incorrect. We present corrected versions of Table 13 and Figure 26.
  • We study the analytic torsion of the cone over an orientable odd dimensional compact connected Riemannian manifold W. We prove that the logarithm of the analytic torsion of the cone decomposes as the sum of the logarithm of the root of the analytic torsion of the boundary of the cone, plus a topological term, plus a further term that is a rational linear combination of local Riemannian invariants of the boundary. We also prove that this last term coincides with the anomaly boundary term appearing in the Cheeger Muller theorem for a manifold with boundary, according to Bruning and Ma, either in the case that W is an odd sphere or has dimension smaller than six. It follows in particular that the Cheeger Muller theorem holds for the cone over an odd dimensional sphere. We also prove Poincare duality for the analytic torsion of a cone.
  • Upcoming surveys with the Herschel Space Observatory will yield far-IR photometry of large samples of young stellar objects, which will require careful interpretation. We investigate the color and luminosity diagnostics based on Herschel broad-band filters to identify and discern the properties of low-mass protostars. We compute a grid of 2,016 protostars in various physical congurations, present the expected flux densities and flux density ratios for this grid of protostars, and compare Herschel observations of three protostars to the model results. These provide useful constraints on the range of colors and fluxes of protostar in the Herschel filters. We find that Herschel data alone is likely a useful diagnostic of the envelope properties of young stars
  • We present 70 and 160 micron Herschel science demonstration images of a field in the Orion A molecular cloud that contains the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, obtained with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). These observations demonstrate Herschel's unprecedented ability to study the rich population of protostars in the Orion molecular clouds at the wavelengths where they emit most of their luminosity. The four protostars previously identified by Spitzer 3.6-40 micron imaging and spectroscopy are detected in the 70 micron band, and three are clearly detected at 160 microns. We measure photometry of the protostars in the PACS bands and assemble their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from 1 to 870 microns with these data, Spitzer spectra and photometry, 2MASS data, and APEX sub-mm data. The SEDs are fit to models generated with radiative transfer codes. From these fits we can constrain the fundamental properties of the protostars. We find luminosities in the range 12-84 L_sun and envelope densities spanning over two orders of magnitude. This implies that the four protostars have a wide range of envelope infall rates and evolutionary states: two have dense, infalling envelopes, while the other two have only residual envelopes. We also show the highly irregular and filamentary structure of the cold dust and gas surrounding the protostars as traced at 160 microns.
  • The NGC 1999 reflection nebula features a dark patch with a size of ~10,000 AU, which has been interpreted as a small, dense foreground globule and possible site of imminent star formation. We present Herschel PACS far-infrared 70 and 160mum maps, which reveal a flux deficit at the location of the globule. We estimate the globule mass needed to produce such an absorption feature to be a few tenths to a few Msun. Inspired by this Herschel observation, we obtained APEX LABOCA and SABOCA submillimeter continuum maps, and Magellan PANIC near-infrared images of the region. We do not detect a submillimer source at the location of the Herschel flux decrement; furthermore our observations place an upper limit on the mass of the globule of ~2.4x10^-2 Msun. Indeed, the submillimeter maps appear to show a flux depression as well. Furthermore, the near-infrared images detect faint background stars that are less affected by extinction inside the dark patch than in its surroundings. We suggest that the dark patch is in fact a hole or cavity in the material producing the NGC 1999 reflection nebula, excavated by protostellar jets from the V 380 Ori multiple system.
  • We have used Spitzer/IRAC to conduct a photometric monitoring program of the IC1396A dark globule in order to study the mid-IR (3.6 - 8 micron) variability of the heavily embedded Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) present in that area. We obtained light curves covering a 14 day timespan with a twice daily cadence for 69 YSOs, and continuous light curves with approximately 12 second cadence over 7 hours for 38 YSOs. Typical accuracies for our relative photometry were 1-2% for the long timespan data and a few mmag, corresponding to less than 0.5%, for the 7 hour continuous "staring-mode" data. More than half of the YSOs showed detectable variability, with amplitudes from ~0.05 mag to ~0.2 mag. About thirty percent of the YSOs showed quasi-sinusoidal light curve shapes with apparent periods from 5-12 days and light curve amplitudes approximately independent of wavelength over the IRAC bandpasses. We have constructed models which simulate the time dependent spectral energy distributions of Class I and I I YSOs in order to attempt to explain these light curves. Based on these models, the apparently periodic light curves are best explained by YSO models where one or two high latitude photospheric spots heat the inner wall of the circumstellar disk, and where we view the disk at fairly large inclination angle. Disk inhomogeneities, such as increasing the height where the accretion funnel flows to the stellar hotspot, enhances the light curve modulations. The other YSOs in our sample show a range of light curve shapes, some of which are probably due to varying accretion rate or disk shadowing events. One star, IC1396A-47, shows a 3.5 hour periodic light curve; this object may be a PMS Delta Scuti star.
  • We present a kinematic study of the Orion Nebula Cluster based upon radial velocities measured by multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 meter MMT and Magellan telescopes. Velocities are reported for 1613 stars, with multi-epoch data for 727 objects as part of our continuing effort to detect and analyze spectroscopic binaries. We confirm and extend the results of Furesz et al. showing that the ONC is not relaxed, consistent with its youth, and that the stars generally follow the position-velocity structure of the moderate density gas in the region, traced by $^{13}$CO. The additional radial velocities we have measured enable us to probe some discrepancies between stellar and gaseous structure which can be attributed to binary motion and the inclusion of non-members in our kinematic sample. Our multi-epoch data allow us to identify 89 spectroscopic binaries; more will be found as we continue monitoring. Our results reinforce the idea that the ONC is a cluster in formation, and thus provides a valuable testing ground for theory. In particular, our observations are not consistent with the quasi-equilibrium or slow contraction models of cluster formation, but are consistent with cold collapse models.
  • We compute the analytic torsion of a cone over a sphere of dimension 1, 2, and 3, and we conjecture a general formula for the cone over an odd dimensional sphere.
  • We study the Reidemeister torsion and the analytic torsion of the $m$ dimensional disc in the Euclidean $m$ dimensional space, using the base for the homology defined by Ray and Singer in \cite{RS}. We prove that the Reidemeister torsion coincides with a power of the volume of the disc. We study the additional terms arising in the analytic torsion due to the boundary, using generalizations of the Cheeger-M\"{u}ller theorem. We use a formula proved by Br\"uning and Ma \cite{BM}, that predicts a new anomaly boundary term beside the known term proportional to the Euler characteristic of the boundary \cite{Luc}. Some of our results extend to the case of the cone over a sphere, in particular we evaluate directly the analytic torsion for a cone over the circle and over the two sphere. We compare the results obtained in the low dimensional cases. We also consider a different formula for the boundary term given by Dai and Fang \cite{DF}, and we show that the result obtained using this formula is inconsistent with the direct calculation of the analytic torsion.
  • Here we present the Spitzer IRS spectrum of CVSO 224, the sole transitional disk located within the ~10 Myr old 25 Orionis group in Orion OB1a. A model fit to the spectral energy distribution of this object indicates a ~7 AU inner disk hole that contains a small amount of optically thin dust. In previous studies, CVSO 224 had been classified as a weak-line T Tauri star based on its Halpha equivalent width, but here we find an accretion rate of 7x10^-11 Msun/yr based on high-resolution Hectochelle data. CVSO 224's low mass accretion rate is in line with photoevaporative clearing theories. However, the Spitzer IRS spectrum of CVSO 224 has a substantial mid-infrared excess beyond 20microns which indicates that it is surrounded by a massive outer disk. Millimeter measurements are necessary to constrain the mass of the outer disk around CVSO 224 in order to confirm that photoevaporation is not the mechanism behind creating its inner disk hole.
  • We present spectra of a sample of Herbig Ae and Be (HAeBe) stars obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. All but one of the Herbig stars show emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and seven of the spectra show PAH emission, but no silicate emission at 10 microns. The central wavelengths of the 6.2, 7.7--8.2, and 11.3 micron emission features decrease with stellar temperature, indicating that the PAHs are less photo-processed in cooler radiation fields. The apparent low level of photo processing in HAeBe stars, relative to other PAH emission sources, implies that the PAHs are newly exposed to the UV-optical radiation fields from their host stars. HAeBe stars show a variety of PAH emission intensities and ionization fractions, but a narrow range of PAH spectral classifications based on positions of major PAH feature centers. This may indicate that, regardless of their locations relative to the stars, the PAH molecules are altered by the same physical processes in the proto-planetary disks of intermediate-mass stars. Analysis of the mid-IR spectral energy distributions indicates that our sample likely includes both radially flared and more flattened/settled disk systems, but we do not see the expected correlation of overall PAH emission with disk geometry. We suggest that the strength of PAH emission from HAeBe stars may depend not only on the degree of radial flaring, but also on the abundance of PAHs in illuminated regions of the disks and possibly on the vertical structure of the inner disk as well.
  • We have performed a census of disks around brown dwarfs in the Sigma Ori cluster using all available images from IRAC onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. To search for new low-mass cluster members with disks, we have measured photometry for all sources in the Spitzer images and have identified the ones that have red colors that are indicative of disks. We present 5 promising candidates, which may consist of 2 brown dwarfs, 2 stars with edge-on disks, and a low-mass protostar if they are bona fide members. Spectroscopy is needed to verify the nature of these sources. We have also used the Spitzer data to determine which of the previously known probable members of Sigma Ori are likely to have disks. By doing so, we measure disk fractions of ~40% and ~60% for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, respectively. These results are similar to previous estimates of disk fractions in IC 348 and Cha I, which have roughly the same median ages as Sigma Ori (3 Myr). Finally, we note that our photometric measurements and the sources that we identify as having disks differ significantly from those of other recent studies that analyzed the same Spitzer images. For instance, previous work has suggested that the T dwarf S Ori 70 is redder than typical field dwarfs, which has been cited as possible evidence of youth and cluster membership. However, we find that this object is only slightly redder than the reddest field dwarfs in [3.6]-[4.5] (1.56+/-0.07 vs. 0.93-1.46). We measure a larger excess in [3.6]-[5.8] (1.75+/-0.21 vs. 0.87-1.19), but the flux at 5.8um may be overestimated because of the low signal-to-noise ratio of the detection. Thus, the Spitzer data do not offer strong evidence of youth and membership for this object, which is the faintest and coolest candidate member of Sigma Ori that has been identified to date.
  • We present a census of circumstellar disks in the Chamaeleon I star-forming region. Using the Infrared Array Camera and the Multiband Imaging Photometer onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we have obtained images of Chamaeleon I at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 um. To search for new disk-bearing members of the cluster, we have performed spectroscopy on objects that have red colors in these data. Through this work, we have discovered four new members of Chamaeleon I with spectral types of M4, M6, M7.5, and L0. The first three objects are highly embedded (A_J~5) and reside near known protostars, indicating that they may be among the youngest low-mass sources in the cluster (<1 Myr). The L0 source is the coolest known member of Chamaeleon I. Its luminosity implies a mass of 0.004-0.01 M_sun, making it the least massive brown dwarf for which a circumstellar disk has been reliably detected. To characterize the disk population in Chamaeleon I, we have classified the infrared spectral energy distributions of the 203 known members that are encompassed by the Spitzer images. Through these classifications, we find that the disk fraction in Chamaeleon I is roughly constant at ~50% from 0.01 to 0.3 M_sun. These data are similar to the disk fraction of IC 348, which is a denser cluster at the same age as Chamaeleon I. However, the disk fraction at M>1 M_sun is significantly higher in Chamaeleon I than in IC 348 (65% vs. 20%), indicating longer disk lifetimes in Chamaeleon I for this mass range. Thus, low-density star-forming regions like Chamaeleon I may offer more time for planet formation around solar-type stars than denser clusters.