• The recent discovery of topology-protected charge transport of ultimate thinness on surfaces of three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) are breaking new ground in fundamental quantum science and transformative technology. Yet a challenge remains on how to isolate and disentangle helical spin transport on the surface from bulk conduction. Here we show that selective midinfrared femtosecond photoexcitation of exclusive intraband electronic transitions at low temperature underpins topological enhancement of terahertz (THz) surface transport in doped Bi2Se3, with no complication from interband excitations or need for controlled doping. The unique, hot electron state is characterized by conserved populations of surface/bulk bands and by frequency-dependent hot carrier cooling times that directly distinguish the faster surface channel than the bulk. We determine the topological enhancement ratio between bulk and surface scattering rates, i.e., $\gamma_\text{BS}/\gamma_\text{SS}\sim$3.80 in equilibrium. These behaviors are absent at elevated lattice temperatures and for high pumpphoton frequencies and uences. The selective, mid-infrared-induced THz conductivity provides a new paradigm to characterize TIs and may apply to emerging topological semimetals in order to separate the transport connected with the Weyl nodes from other bulk bands.
  • Non-stoichiometry effect on the extreme magnetoresistance is systematically investigated for the Weyl semimetal WTe2. Magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity are measured for the as-grown samples with a slight difference in Te vacancies and the annealed samples with increased Te vacancies. The fittings to a two-carrier model show that the magnetoresistance is strongly dependent on the residual resistivity ratio (i.e., the degree of non-stoichiometry), which is eventually understood in terms of electron doping which not only breaks the balance between electron-type and hole-type carrier densities but also reduces the average carrier mobility. Thus, compensation effect and ultrahigh mobility are probably the main driving force of the extreme magnetoresistance in WTe2.
  • Ultrafast terahertz (THz) pump{probe spectroscopy reveals unusual out-of-equilibrium Cooper pair dynamics driven by femtosecond (fs) optical quench of superconductivity (SC) in iron pnictides. We observe a two{step quench of the SC gap, where an abnormally slow (many 100's of ps) quench process is clearly distinguished from the usual fast (sub-ps) hot{phonon{mediated scattering channel. This pair breaking dynamics depends strongly on doping, pump uence, and temperature. The above observations, together with quantum kinetic modeling of non-equilibrium SC and magnetic correlations, provide evidence for photogeneration of a transient state where SC competes with build{up of spin-density-wave (SDW) excitonic correlation between quasi-particles (QP).
  • The fractional or non-integer valence state in 3d and 4d transition metal oxides always gives rise to novel physics and multifunctional applications, such as charge order, magnetoelectric effect, and double exchange. The ground state becomes even more complex for 5d systems, as a result of the enhanced spin-orbit couplings. In this paper, experimental and theoretical studies are performed on La3Ir3O11, a new iridate with a non-1/2 fractional valence state (+4.33) for Ir ions and a three-dimensional strongly frustrated structure composed of edge-shared Ir2O10 dimers. Density functional theory calculations explain the spin-orbit driven Mott insulating transport, and show that the electronic state is neither Jeff=1/2 state nor J=0 state. Such a peculiar electronic state leads to a novel magnetic ground state, which hosts strong antiferromagnetic fluctuation yet without a long-range magnetic order. These behaviors are eventually demonstrated by our theoretical model beyond the simple Curie-Weiss law. Our work would shed new light on the studies of quantum spin liquid.
  • We show that strongly photoexcited graphene monolayers with 35fs pulses quasi-instantaneously build up a broadband, inverted Dirac fermion population. Optical gain emerges and directly manifests itself via a negative optical conductivity for the first 200fs, where stimulated emission completely compensates absorption loss in the graphene layer. Our experiment-theory comparison with two distinct electron and hole chemical potentials reproduce absorption saturation and gain at 40fs, revealing, particularly, the evolution of the transient state from a hot classical gas to a dense quantum fluid with increasing the photoexcitation.
  • We demonstrate an ultrafast reversible modulation of resonant terahertz (THz) response in strongly photoexcited metamaterials. The transient spectral-temporal response of the dipole transition ~1.6 THz exhibits a distinct non-monotonic variation as a function of pump fluence. The transition energy shift, strength, spectral width and density-dependent ultrafast relaxation manifest a remarkable re-emergence of the resonances after initial quenching. Our simulation, incorporating the first-order diffraction from the photoinduced transient grating, reproduces the salient features, providing a new avenue for designing nonlinear and frequency-agile THz modulators.
  • We present the design and implementation of a trapped ion cavity QED system. A single ytterbium ion is confined by a micron-scale ion trap inside a 2 mm optical cavity. The ion is coherently pumped by near resonant laser light while the cavity output is monitored as a function of pump intensity and cavity detuning. We observe a Purcell enhancement of scattered light into the solid angle subtended by the optical cavity, as well as a three-peak structure arising from strongly driving the atom. This system can be integrated into existing atom{photon quantum network protocols and is a pathway towards an efficient atom{photon quantum interface.
  • Randomness is a fundamental feature in nature and a valuable resource for applications ranging from cryptography and gambling to numerical simulation of physical and biological systems. Random numbers, however, are difficult to characterize mathematically, and their generation must rely on an unpredictable physical process. Inaccuracies in the theoretical modelling of such processes or failures of the devices, possibly due to adversarial attacks, limit the reliability of random number generators in ways that are difficult to control and detect. Here, inspired by earlier work on nonlocality based and device independent quantum information processing, we show that the nonlocal correlations of entangled quantum particles can be used to certify the presence of genuine randomness. It is thereby possible to design of a new type of cryptographically secure random number generator which does not require any assumption on the internal working of the devices. This strong form of randomness generation is impossible classically and possible in quantum systems only if certified by a Bell inequality violation. We carry out a proof-of-concept demonstration of this proposal in a system of two entangled atoms separated by approximately 1 meter. The observed Bell inequality violation, featuring near-perfect detection efficiency, guarantees that 42 new random numbers are generated with 99% confidence. Our results lay the groundwork for future device-independent quantum information experiments and for addressing fundamental issues raised by the intrinsic randomness of quantum theory.
  • Quantum networks based on atomic qubits and scattered photons provide a promising way to build a large-scale quantum information processor. We review quantum protocols for generating entanglement and operating gates between two distant atomic qubits, which can be used for constructing scalable atom--photon quantum networks. We emphasize the crucial role of collecting light from atomic qubits for large-scale networking and describe two techniques to enhance light collection using reflective optics or optical cavities. A brief survey of some applications for scalable and efficient atom--photon networks is also provided.
  • We report the observation of spin segregation, i.e., separation of spin density profiles, in a trapped ultracold Fermi gas of $^6$Li with a magnetically tunable scattering length close to zero. The roles of the spin components are inverted when the sign of the scattering length is reversed. The observed density profiles are in qualitative agreement with the spin-wave theory applied previously to explain spin segregation in a Bose gas, but disagree in amplitude by two orders of magnitude. The observed atomic density profiles are far from equilibrium, yet they persist for $\simeq$ 5 seconds in a trap with an axial frequency of $\simeq$ 150 Hz. We attribute this long lifetime to Fermi statistics: The scattering amplitude is nonzero only for atoms in opposite states, and vanishes for atoms in the same state. By measuring the magnetic field at which spin segregation ceases, we precisely determine the zero crossing in the scattering length of $^6$Li as $527.5\pm0.2$ G.
  • Sound waves are observed and studied in an optically trapped degenerate Fermi gas of spin-up and spin-down atoms with magnetically tunable interactions. Measurements are made throughout the crossover region, from a weakly-interacting Fermi gas through the resonant Fermi superfluid regime to a Bose condensate of dimer molecules. The measured sound velocities test the equation of state and confirm the universal hypothesis.
  • We report a model-independent measurement of the entropy, energy, and critical temperature of a degenerate, strongly interacting Fermi gas of atoms. The total energy is determined from the mean square cloud size in the strongly interacting regime, where the gas exhibits universal behavior. The entropy is measured by sweeping a bias magnetic field to adiabatically tune the gas from the strongly interacting regime to a weakly interacting regime, where the entropy is known from the cloud size after the sweep. The dependence of the entropy on the total energy quantitatively tests predictions of the finite-temperature thermodynamics.