• Electrons accelerated in relativistic collisionless shocks are usually assumed to follow a power-law energy distribution with an index of $p$. Observationally, although most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have afterglows that are consistent with $p>2$, there are still a few GRBs suggestive of a hard ($p<2$) electron energy spectrum. Our previous works found strong evidence for the exist of a double power-law hard electron energy (DPLH) spectrum with $1<p_1<2$, $p_2>2$ and an injection break assumed as $\gamma_{\rm b}\propto \gamma^{q}$ in the relativistic regime. Moreover, these works suggested a possibly universal value of $q\sim0.5$. GRB~060908 is another case that shows a flat spectrum in the optical/near-infrared band and requires a hard electron energy distribution, which, along with the rich multi-band afterglow data, provides us an opportunity to test this conjecture. Based on the model of \citet{Resmi08}, we explain the multi-band afterglow of GRB~060908 in a wind medium and take also the synchrotron self-Compton effect. We show that though the DPLH spectrum is favored by the afterglow data, the value of $q$ is badly constrained due to the relatively large uncertainties of the spectral indices. However, the afterglow can be well reproduced if we adopt $q=0.5$, implying the compatibility of the above conjecture with the data.
  • Electrons accelerated in relativistic collisionless shocks are usually assumed to follow a power-law energy distribution with an index of $p$. Observationally, although most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have afterglows that are consistent with $p>2$, there are still a few GRBs suggestive of a hard ($p<2$) electron energy spectrum. Our previous work showed that GRB 091127 gave strong evidence for a double power-law hard electron energy (DPLH) spectrum with $1<p_1<2$, $p_2>2$ and an "injection break" assumed as $\gamma_{\rm b}\propto \gamma^q$ in the highly relativistic regime, where $\gamma$ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet. In this paper, we show that GRB 060614 and GRB 060908 provide further evidence for such a DPLH spectrum. We interpret the multi-band afterglow of GRB 060614 with the DPLH model in an homogeneous interstellar medium by taking into account a continuous energy injection process, while for GRB 060908, a wind-like circumburst density profile is used. The two bursts, along with GRB 091127, suggest a similar behavior in the evolution of the injection break, with $q\sim0.5$. Whether this represents a universal law of the injection break remains uncertain and more such afterglow observations are needed to test this conjecture.
  • iPTF16asu is a peculiar broad-lined type Ic supernova (SN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory. With a rest-frame rise time of only 4 days, iPTF16asu challenges the existing popular models, for example, the radioactive heating (56Ni-only) and the magnetar+56Ni models. Here we show that this rapid rise could be attributed to interaction between the SN ejecta and a pre-existing circumstellar medium ejected by the progenitor during its final stages of evolution, while the late-time light curve can be better explained by energy input from a rapidly spinning magnetar. This model is a natural extension to the previous magnetar model. The mass-loss rate of the progenitor and ejecta mass are consistent with a progenitor that experienced a common envelope evolution in a binary. An alternative model for the early rapid rise of the light curve is the cooling of a shock propagating into an extended envelope of the progenitor. It is difficult at this stage to tell which model (interaction+magnetar+56Ni or cooling+magnetar+56Ni) is better for iPTF16asu.
  • We infer the emission positions of twin kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in neutron star low mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs) based on the Alfven wave oscillation model (AWOM). For most sources, the emission radii of kHz QPOs cluster around a region of 16-19 km with the assumed NS radii of 15 km. Cir X-1 has the larger emission radii of 23-38 km than those of the other sources, which may be ascribed to its large magnetosphere-disk radius or strong NS surface magnetic field. SAX J1808.4-3658 is also a particular source with the relative large emission radii of kHz QPOs of 20 - 23 km, which may be due to its large inferred NS radius of 18 - 19 km. The emission radii of kHz QPOs for all the sources are larger than the NS radii, and the possible explanations of which are presented. The similarity of the emission radii of kHz QPOs (16-19 km) for both the low/high luminosity Atoll/Z sources is found, which indicates that both sources share the similar magnetosphere- disk radii.
  • (adapted)Considering recent observations challenging the traditional magnetar model, we explore the wind braking of magnetars. There is evidence for strong multipole magnetic fields in active magnetars, but the dipole field inferred from spin down measurements may be strongly biased by a particle wind. Recent challenging observations of magnetars may be explained naturally in the wind braking scenario: (1) The supernova energies of magnetars are of normal value; (2) The non-detection in Fermi observations of magnetars; (3) The problem posed by the low-magnetic field soft gamma-ray repeaters; (4) The relation between magnetars and high magnetic field pulsars; (5) A decreasing period derivative during magnetar outbursts. Transient magnetars may still be magnetic dipole braking. This may explain why low luminosity magnetars are more likely to have radio emissions. In the wind braking scenario, magnetars are neutron stars with strong multipole field. For some sources, a strong dipole field may be no longer needed. A magnetism-powered pulsar wind nebula and a braking index smaller than three are the two predictions of the wind braking model.
  • We take the recently published data of twin kHz quasi-period oscillations (QPOs) in neutron star (NS) lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) as the samples, and investigate the morphology of the samples, which focuses on the quality factor, peak frequency of kHz QPOs, and try to infer their physical mechanism. We notice that: (1) The quality factors of upper kHz QPOs are low (2 ~ 20 in general) and increase with the kHz QPO peak frequencies for both Z and Atoll sources. (2) The distribution of quality factor versus frequency for the lower kHz QPOs are quite different between Z and Atoll sources. For most Z source samples, the quality factors of lower kHz QPOs are low (usually lower than 15) and rise steadily with the peak frequencies except for Sco X-1, which drop abruptly at the frequency of about 750 Hz. While for most Atoll sources, the quality factors of lower kHz QPOs are very high (from 2 to 200) and usually have a rising part, a maximum and an abrupt drop. (3) There are three Atoll sources (4U 1728-34, 4U 1636-53 and 4U 1608-52) of displaying very high quality factors for lower kHz QPOs. These three sources have been detected with the spin frequencies and sidebands, in which the source with higher spin frequency presents higher quality factor of lower kHz QPOs and lower difference between sideband frequency and lower kHz QPO frequency.
  • In this paper, the rms-flux (root mean square-flux) relation along the Z-track of the bright Z-Source Cyg X-2 is analyzed using the observational data of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). Three types of rms-flux relations, i.e. positive, negative, and 'arch'-like correlations are found in different branches. The rms is positively correlated with flux in normal branch (NB), but anti-correlated in the vertical horizontal branch (VHB). The rms-flux relation shows an 'arch'-like shape in the horizontal branch (HB). We also try to explain this phenomenon using existing models.
  • The X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs) are peculiar pulsar-like objects, characterized by their very well Planck-like spectrum. In studying their spectral energy distributions, the optical/UV excess is a long standing problem. Recently, Kaplan et al. (2011) have measured the optical/UV excess for all seven sources, which is understandable in the resonant cyclotron scattering (RCS) model previously addressed. The RCS model calculations show that the RCS process can account for the observed optical/UV excess for most sources . The flat spectrum of RX J2143.0+0654 may due to contribution from bremsstrahlung emission of the electron system in addition to the RCS process.
  • Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are magnetar candidates, i.e., neutron stars powered by strong magnetic field. If they are indeed magnetars, they will emit high-energy gamma-rays which are detectable by Fermi-LAT according to the outer gap model. However, no significant detection is reported in recent Fermi-LAT observations of all known AXPs and SGRs. Considering the discrepancy between theory and observations, we calculate the theoretical spectra for all AXPs and SGRs with sufficient observational parameters. Our results show that most AXPs and SGRs are high-energy gamma-ray emitters if they are really magnetars. The four AXPs 1E 1547.0-5408, XTE J1810-197, 1E 1048.1-5937, and 4U 0142+61 should have been detected by Fermi-LAT. Then there is conflict between out gap model in the case of magnetars and Fermi observations. Possible explanations in the magnetar model are discussed. On the other hand, if AXPs and SGRs are fallback disk systems, i.e., accretion-powered for the persistent emissions, most of them are not high-energy gamma-ray emitters. Future deep Fermi-LAT observations of AXPs and SGRs will help us make clear whether they are magnetars or fallback disk systems.
  • Significant research in compact stars is currently focused on two kinds of enigmatic sources: anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs). Although AXPs and SGRs are popularly thought to be magnetars, other models (e.g. the accretion model) to understand the observations can still not be ruled out. It is worth noting that a non-detection in a Fermi/LAT observation of AXP 4U 0142+61 has been reported recently by Sasmaz Mus & Gogus. We propose here that Fermi/LAT observations may distinguish between the magnetar model and the accretion model for AXPs and SGRs. We explain how this null observation of AXP 4U 0142+61 favors the accretion model. Future Fermi/LAT observations of AXP 1E 1547.0-5408 and AXP 1E 1048.1-5937 are highly recommended.
  • A technique for timescale analysis of spectral lags performed directly in the time domain is developed. Simulation studies are made to compare the time domain technique with the Fourier frequency analysis for spectral time lags. The time domain technique is applied to studying rapid variabilities of X-ray binaries and $\gamma$-ray bursts. The results indicate that in comparison with the Fourier analysis the timescale analysis technique is more powerful for the study of spectral lags in rapid variabilities on short time scales and short duration flaring phenomena.
  • We investigated the time lags and the evolution of the cross spectra of Z source GX~5-1, observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), when it is in the horizontal branch oscillations. We showed that the time lags of 3 horizontal branch oscillations are related to the position on the hardness intensity diagram. All of the three QPOs were shown to have hard time lags. However on the cross spectra, one is in a `dip', one in a `bump', the other has no so obvious characteristic. The time lags of two of the QPOs decrease with QPO's frequency, while the other has a trend increasing with its frequency. Moreover, in the normal branch, we found no significant time lags in the present observational data.
  • We consider in this paper the effect of synchrotron self-Compton process on X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts. We find that for a wide range of parameter values, especially for the standard values which imply the energy in the electrons behind the afterglow shock is tens times as that in the magnetic field, the electron cooling is dominated by Compton cooling rather than synchrotron one. This leads to a different evolution of cooling frequency in the synchrotron emission component, and hence a different (flatter) light curve slope in the X-ray range. This effect should be taken into account when estimating the afterglow parameters by X-ray observational data. For somewhat higher ambient density, the synchrotron self-Compton emission may be directly detected in X-ray range, showing varying spectral slopes and a quite steep light curve slope.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to originate from ultra-relativistic winds/fireballs to avoid the "compactness problem". However, the most energetic photons in GRBs may still suffer from $\gamma-\gamma$ absorption leading to electron/positron pair production in the winds/fireballs. We show here that in a wide range of model parameters, the resulting pairs may dominate those electrons associated with baryons. Later on, the pairs would be carried into a reverse shock so that a shocked pair-rich fireball may produce a strong flash at lower frequencies, i.e. in the IR band, in contrast with optical/UV emission from a pair-poor fireball. The IR emission would show a 5/2 spectral index due to strong self-absorption. Rapid responses to GRB triggers in the IR band would detect such strong flashes. The future detections of many IR flashes will infer that the rarity of prompt optical/UV emissions is in fact due to dust obscuration in the star formation regions.
  • We investigate the number of gamma-ray bursts in two particular strips of the sky using the data in 3B catalog of Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). One stripe is related to the plane in which the intergalactic globular clusters (R>25kpc) and Galactic satellite galaxies (45kpc<R<280kpc) concentrate, the other is concerned to nearby galaxies (1Mpc<R<11Mpc). We find that the density of GRBs in these two strips is higher than that in other parts of the sky with significance 2.8 and 1.9\sigma respectively. We also compare the peak flux distribution of GRBs in these two stripes with that in other parts of the sky, and find no difference in the former stripe but a difference in the latter with a significant level \alpha =0.05. This is consistent with the distance scales of these two planes. So it suggests that at least a substantial fraction of GRBs may be related to those objects in these two planes and thus originate within 11 Mpc.