• The study of the rotational spectrum of NaCN (X $^1$A') has recently been extended in frequency and in quantum numbers. Difficulties have been encountered in fitting the transition frequencies within experimental uncertainties. Various trial fits traced the difficulties to the incomplete diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. Employing fewer spectroscopic parameters than before, the transition frequencies could be reproduced within experimental uncertainties on average. Predictions of $a$-type $R$-branch transitions with $K_a \le 7$ up to 570 GHz should be reliable to better than 1 MHz. In addition, modified spectroscopic parameters have been derived for the 13C isotopic species of NaCN.
  • 12C/13C isotopologue abundance anomalies have long been predicted for gas-phase chemistry in molecules other than CO and have recently been observed in the Taurus molecular cloud in several species hosting more than one carbon atom, i.e. CCH, CCS, CCCS and HC$_3$N. Here we work to ascertain whether these isotopologic anomalies actually result from the predicted depletion of the 13C+ ion in an oxygen-rich optically-shielded dense gas, or from some other more particular mechanism or mechanisms. We observed $\lambda$3mm emission from carbon, sulfur and nitrogen-bearing isotopologues of HNC, CS and \HH CS at three positions in Taurus(TMC1, L1527 and the ammonia peak) using the ARO 12m telescope. We saw no evidence of 12C/13C anomalies in our observations. Although the pool of C+ is likely to be depleted in 13C 13C is not depleted in the general pool of carbon outside CO, which probably exists mostly in the form of C^0. The observed isotopologic abundance anomalies are peculiar to those species in which they are found.
  • An emerging theme in modern astrophysics is the connection between astronomical observations and the underlying physical phenomena that drive our cosmos. Both the mechanisms responsible for the observed astrophysical phenomena and the tools used to probe such phenomena - the radiation and particle spectra we observe - have their roots in atomic, molecular, condensed matter, plasma, nuclear and particle physics. Chemistry is implicitly included in both molecular and condensed matter physics. This connection is the theme of the present report, which provides a broad, though non-exhaustive, overview of progress in our understanding of the cosmos resulting from recent theoretical and experimental advances in what is commonly called laboratory astrophysics. This work, carried out by a diverse community of laboratory astrophysicists, is increasingly important as astrophysics transitions into an era of precise measurement and high fidelity modeling.
  • The BL Lac object S5 0716+71 was observed in a global multi-frequency campaign to search for rapid and correlated flux density variability and signatures of an inverse-Compton (IC) catastrophe during the states of extreme apparent brightness temperatures. The observing campaign involved simultaneous monitoring at radio to IR/optical wavelengths centered around a 500-ks INTEGRAL pointing (November 10-17, 2003). We present the combined analysis and results of the cm- to sub-mm observations including a detailed study of the inter- to intra-day variability and spectral characteristics of 0716+714. We further constrain the variability brightness temperatures (T_B) and Doppler factors (delta) comparing the radio-bands with the hard X-ray emission (3-200 keV). 0716+714 was in an exceptionally high state (outburst) and different (slower) phase of short-term variability. The flux density variability in the cm- to mm-bands is dominated by a correlated, ~4 day time scale amplitude increase of up to ~35% systematically more pronounced towards shorter wavelengths. This contradicts expectations from standard interstellar scintillation (ISS) and suggests a source-intrinsic origin of the variability. The derived lower limits to T_B exceed the 10^12 K IC-limit by up to 3-4 orders of magnitude. Assuming relativistic boosting, we obtain robust and self-consistent lower limits of delta >= 5-33, in good agreement with delta_VLBI obtained from VLBI studies and the IC-Doppler factors delta_IC > 14-16 obtained from the INTEGRAL data. Since a strong contribution from ISS can be excluded and a simultaneous IC catastrophe was not observed, we conclude that relativistic Doppler boosting naturally explains the apparent violation of the theoretical limits within standard synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC) jet models of AGN.
  • We present an interferometric and single dish study of small organic species toward Comets C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) using the BIMA interferometer at 3 mm and the ARO 12m telescope at 2 mm. For Comet Hale-Bopp, both the single-dish and interferometer observations of CH3OH indicate an excitation temperature of 105+/-5 K and an average production rate ratio Q(CH3OH)/Q(H2O)~1.3% at ~1 AU. Additionally, the aperture synthesis observations of CH3OH suggest a distribution well described by a spherical outflow and no evidence of significant extended emission. Single-dish observations of CH3CN in Comet Hale-Bopp indicate an excitation temperature of 200+/-10 K and a production rate ratio of Q(CH3CN)/Q(H2O)~0.017% at ~1 AU. The non-detection of a previously claimed transition of cometary (CH2OH)2 toward Comet Hale-Bopp with the 12m telescope indicates a compact distribution of emission, D<9'' (<8500 km). For the single-dish observations of Comet T7 LINEAR, we find an excitation temperature of CH3OH of 35+/-5 K and a CH3OH production rate ratio of Q(CH3OH)/Q(H2O)~1.5% at ~0.3 AU. Our data support current chemical models that CH3OH, CH3CN and (CH2OH)2 are parent nuclear species distributed into the coma via direct sublimation off cometary ices from the nucleus with no evidence of significant production in the outer coma.
  • The circumstellar envelopes of carbon-rich AGB stars show a chemical complexity that is exemplified by the prototypical object IRC +10216, in which about 60 different molecules have been detected to date. Most of these species are carbon chains of the type CnH, CnH2, CnN, HCnN. We present the detection of new species (CH2CHCN, CH2CN, H2CS, CH3CCH and C3O) achieved thanks to the systematic observation of the full 3 mm window with the IRAM 30m telescope plus some ARO 12m observations. All these species, known to exist in the interstellar medium, are detected for the first time in a circumstellar envelope around an AGB star. These five molecules are most likely formed in the outer expanding envelope rather than in the stellar photosphere. A pure gas phase chemical model of the circumstellar envelope is reasonably successful in explaining the derived abundances, and additionally allows to elucidate the chemical formation routes and to predict the spatial distribution of the detected species.
  • The detection of NaCl at large radii in the Egg Nebula, CRL 2688, requires densities of 10^7 - 10^8 cm^-3 in a thick shell of r ~ a few X 10^17 cm. To explain these results, a mechanism is needed for producing high densities at a considerable distance from the central star. In two dimensional simulations of the interaction of the fast wind with an ambient medium, the material becomes thermally unstable. The resulting clumps can achieve the requisite conditions for NaCl excitation. We present 2D models with simple physics as proof-of-principle calculations to show that the clumping behavior is robust. Clumping is a natural outcome of cooling in the colliding wind model and comparable to that inferred from observations.