• The JAXA Hayabusa-2 mission was approved in 2010 and launched on December 3, 2014. The spacecraft will arrive at the near-Earth asteroid 162173 Ryugu in 2018 where it will perform a survey, land and obtain surface material, then depart in Dec 2019 and return to Earth in Dec 2020. We observed Ryugu with the Herschel Space Observatory in Apr 2012 at far-IR thermal wavelengths, supported by several ground-based observations to obtain optical lightcurves. We reanalysed previously published Subaru-COMICS and AKARI-IRC observations and merged them with a Spitzer-IRS data set. In addition, we used a large set of Spitzer-IRAC observations obtained in the period Jan to May, 2013. The data set includes two complete rotational lightcurves and a series of ten "point-and-shoot" observations. The almost spherical shape of the target together with the insufficient lightcurve quality forced us to combine radiometric and lightcurve inversion techniques in different ways to find the object's key physical and thermal parameters. We find that the solution which best matches our data sets leads to this C class asteroid having a retrograde rotation with a spin-axis orientation of (lambda = 310-340 deg; beta = -40+/-15 deg) in ecliptic coordinates, an effective diameter (of an equal-volume sphere) of 850 to 880 m, a geometric albedo of 0.044 to 0.050 and a thermal inertia in the range 150 to 300 Jm-2s-0.5K-1. Based on estimated thermal conductivities of the top-layer surface in the range 0.1 to 0.6 WK-1m-1, we calculated that the grain sizes are approximately equal to between 1 and 10 mm. The finely constrained values for this asteroid serve as a `design reference model', which is currently used for various planning, operational and modelling purposes by the Hayabusa2 team.
  • The near-Earth asteroid (99942) Apophis is a potentially hazardous asteroid. We obtained far-infrared observations of this asteroid with the Herschel Space Observatory's PACS instrument at 70, 100, and 160 micron. These were taken at two epochs in January and March 2013 during a close Earth encounter. These first thermal measurements of Apophis were taken at similar phase angles before and after opposition. We performed a detailed thermophysical model analysis by using the spin and shape model recently derived from applying a 2-period Fourier series method to a large sample of well-calibrated photometric observations. We find that the tumbling asteroid Apophis has an elongated shape with a mean diameter of 375$^{+14}_{-10}$ m (of an equal volume sphere) and a geometric V-band albedo of 0.30$^{+0.05}_{-0.06}$. We find a thermal inertia in the range 250-800 Jm$^{-2}$s$^{-0.5}$K$^{-1}$ (best solution at 600 Jm$^{-2}$s$^{-0.5}$K$^{-1}$), which can be explained by a mixture of low conductivity fine regolith with larger rocks and boulders of high thermal inertia on the surface. The thermal inertia, and other similarities with (25143) Itokawa indicate that Apophis might also have a rubble-pile structure. If we combine the new size value with the assumption of an Itokawa-like density and porosity we estimate a mass between 4.4 and 6.2 10$^{10}$ kg which is more than 2-3 times larger than previous estimates. We expect that the newly derived properties will influence impact scenario studies and influence the long-term orbit predictions of Apophis.
  • Our goal was to characterize the distant gaseous and dust activity of comet C\2012 S1 (ISON), inbound, from observations of H2O, CO and the dust coma in the far-infrared and submillimeter domains. In this paper, we report observations undertaken with the Herschel Space Observatory on 8 & 13 March 2013 (rh = 4.54 - 4.47AU) and with the 30m telescope of Institut de Radioastronomie Millim\'etrique (IRAM) in March and April 2013 (rh = 4.45 - 4.18 AU). The HIFI instrument aboard Herschel was used to observe the H$_{2}$O $1_{10}-1_{01}$ line at 557 GHz, whereas images of the dust coma at 70 and 160 {\mu}m were acquired with the PACS instrument. Spectra acquired at the IRAM 30m telescope cover the CO J(2-1) line at 230.5 GHz. The spectral observations were analysed with excitation and radiative transfer models. A model of dust thermal emission taking into account a range of dust sizes is used to analyse the PACS maps. While H$_{2}$O was not detected in our 8 March 2013 observation, we derive a sensitive 3 $\sigma$ upper limit of QH$_{2}$O < 3.5 x 10$^{26}$ molecules/s for this date. A marginal 3.2 $\sigma$ detection of CO is found, corresponding to a CO production rate of QCO = 3.5 x 10$^{27}$ molecules/s. The Herschel PACS measurements show a clear detection of the coma and tail in both the 70 {\mu}m and 160 {\mu}m maps. Under the assumption of a 2 km radius nucleus, we infer dust production rates in the range 10 - 13 kg/s or 40 - 70 kg/s depending on whether a low or high gaseous activity from the nucleus surface is assumed. We constrain the size distribution of the emitted dust by comparing PACS 70 and 160 {\mu}m data, and considering optical data. Size indices between -4 and -3.6 are suggested. The morphology of the tail observed on 70 {\mu}m images can be explained by the presence of grains with ages older than 60 days.
  • The near-Earth asteroid (308635) 2005 YU55 is a potentially hazardous asteroid which was discovered in 2005 and passed Earth on November 8th 2011 at 0.85 lunar distances. This was the closest known approach by an asteroid of several hundred metre diameter since 1976 when a similar size object passed at 0.5 lunar distances. We observed 2005 YU55 from ground with a recently developed mid-IR camera (miniTAO/MAX38) in N- and Q-band and with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 1.3 mm. In addition, we obtained space observations with Herschel/PACS at 70, 100, and 160 micron. Our thermal measurements cover a wide range of wavelengths from 8.9 micron to 1.3 mm and were taken after opposition at phase angles between -97 deg and -18 deg. We performed a radiometric analysis via a thermophysical model and combined our derived properties with results from radar, adaptive optics, lightcurve observations, speckle and auxiliary thermal data. We find that (308635) 2005 YU55 has an almost spherical shape with an effective diameter of 300 to 312 m and a geometric albedo pV of 0.055 to 0.075. Its spin-axis is oriented towards celestial directions (lam_ecl, beta_ecl) = (60 deg +/- 30deg, -60 deg +/- 15 deg), which means it has a retrograde sense of rotation. The analysis of all available data combined revealed a discrepancy with the radar-derived size. Our radiometric analysis of the thermal data together with the problem to find a unique rotation period might be connected to a non-principal axis rotation. A low to intermediate level of surface roughness (r.m.s. of surface slopes in the range 0.1 - 0.3) is required to explain the available thermal measurements. We found a thermal inertia in the range 350-800 Jm^-2s^-0.5K^-1, very similar to the rubble-pile asteroid (25143) Itokawa and indicating a mixture of low conductivity fine regolith with larger rocks and boulders of high thermal inertia on the surface.
  • In September 2011, the Herschel Space Observatory performed an observation campaign with the PACS photometer observing the asteroid (101955) 1999 RQ36 in the far infrared. The Herschel observations were analysed, together with ESO VLT-VISIR and Spitzer-IRS data, by means of a thermophysical model in order to derive the physical properties of 1999 RQ36. We find the asteroid has an effective diameter in the range 480 to 511 m, a slightly elongated shape with a semi-major axis ratio of a/b=1.04, a geometric albedo of 0.045 +0.015/-0.012, and a retrograde rotation with a spin vector between -70 and -90 deg ecliptic latitude. The thermal emission at wavelengths below 12 micron -originating in the hot sub-solar region- shows that there may be large variations in roughness on the surface along the equatorial zone of 1999 RQ36, but further measurements are required for final proof. We determine that the asteroid has a disk-averaged thermal inertia of Gamma = 650 Jm-2s-0.5K-1 with a 3-sigma confidence range of 350 to 950 Jm-2s-0.5K-1, equivalent to what is observed for 25143 Itokawa and suggestive that 1999 RQ36 has a similar surface texture and may also be a rubble-pile in nature. The low albedo indicates that 1999 RQ36 very likely contains primitive volatile-rich material, consistent with its spectral type, and that it is an ideal target for the OSIRIS-REx sample return mission.
  • We present a comparison of our results from ground-based observations of asteroid (21) Lutetia with imaging data acquired during the flyby of the asteroid by the ESA Rosetta mission. This flyby provided a unique opportunity to evaluate and calibrate our method of determination of size, 3-D shape, and spin of an asteroid from ground-based observations. We present our 3-D shape-modeling technique KOALA which is based on multi-dataset inversion. We compare the results we obtained with KOALA, prior to the flyby, on asteroid (21) Lutetia with the high-spatial resolution images of the asteroid taken with the OSIRIS camera on-board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft, during its encounter with Lutetia. The spin axis determined with KOALA was found to be accurate to within two degrees, while the KOALA diameter determinations were within 2% of the Rosetta-derived values. The 3-D shape of the KOALA model is also confirmed by the spectacular visual agreement between both 3-D shape models (KOALA pre- and OSIRIS post-flyby). We found a typical deviation of only 2 km at local scales between the profiles from KOALA predictions and OSIRIS images, resulting in a volume uncertainty provided by KOALA better than 10%. Radiometric techniques for the interpretation of thermal infrared data also benefit greatly from the KOALA shape model: the absolute size and geometric albedo can be derived with high accuracy, and thermal properties, for example the thermal inertia, can be determined unambiguously. We consider this to be a validation of the KOALA method. Because space exploration will remain limited to only a few objects, KOALA stands as a powerful technique to study a much larger set of small bodies using Earth-based observations.