• A liquid argon time projection chamber, constructed for the Argon Response to Ionization and Scintillation (ARIS) experiment, has been exposed to the highly collimated and quasi-monoenergetic LICORNE neutron beam at the Institute de Physique Nuclaire Orsay in order to study the scintillation response to nuclear and electronic recoils. An array of liquid scintillator detectors, arranged around the apparatus, tag scattered neutrons and select nuclear recoil energies in the [7, 120] keV energy range. The relative scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils was measured to high precision at null field, and the ion-electron recombination probability was extracted for a range of applied electric fields. Single Compton scattered electrons, produced by gammas emitted from the de-excitation of $^7$Li* in coincidence with the beam pulse, along with calibration gamma sources, are used to extract the recombination probability as a function of energy and electron drift field. The ARIS results have been compared with three recombination probability parameterizations (Thomas-Imel, Doke-Birks, and PARIS), allowing for the definition of a fully comprehensive model of the liquid argon response to nuclear and electronic recoils down to a few keV range. The constraints provided by ARIS to the liquid argon response at low energy allow the reduction of systematics affecting the sensitivity of dark matter search experiments based on liquid argon
  • In a recent publication, we have highlighted the potential of phosphonic acid terminated PEG oligomers to functionalize strong UV absorption cerium oxide nanoparticles[1], which yield suspensions that are stable in aqueous or organic solvents and are redispersible in different solvent after freeze-drying. In the present work, we highlight the interfacial activity of the functional ceria nanoparticles and their potential to modify hydrophobic surfaces. We first investigated Phosphonated-PEG amphiphilic oligomers behavior as strong surface active species forming irreversibly adsorbed layers. We then show that the oligomers interfacial properties translate to the functional nanoparticles. In particular, the addition of a small fraction of phosphonated-PEG oligomers with an extra C16 aliphatic chain (stickers) into the formulation enabled the tuning of i) the nanoparticles adsorption at the air/water, polystyrene/water, oil/water interfaces and ii) the particle/particle interaction in aqueous solutions. We also found that dense and closely packed two dimensional monolayers of nanoceria can be formed by spontaneous adsorption or surface compression using a Langmuir trough. A hexagonal organization controlled by reversible and repulsive repulsion has been characterized by GISAXS. Mono- or multilayers can also be stably formed or transferred on solid surfaces. Our results are key features in the field of polymer surface modification, solid stabilized emulsions (Pickering) or supracolloidal assemblies.
  • Water-soluble clusters made from 7 nm inorganic nanoparticles have been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering. The internal structure factor of the clusters was derived and exhibited a universal behavior as evidenced by a correlation hole at intermediate wave-vectors. Reverse Monte-Carlo calculations were performed to adjust the data and provided an accurate description of the clusters in terms of interparticle distance and volume fraction. Additional parameters influencing the microstructure were also investigated, including the nature and thickness of the nanoparticle adlayer.
  • Rare earth cerium oxide (ceria) nanoparticles are stabilized using end-functional phosphonated-PEG oligomers. The complexation process and structure of the resulting hybrid core-shell singlet nanocolloids are described, characterized and modeled using light and neutron scattering data. The adsorption mechanism is non-stoichiometric, yielding the number of adsorbed chains per particle Nads = 270 at saturation. Adsorption isotherms show a high affinity of the phosphonate head for the ceria surface (adsorption energy ~ -16 kT) suggesting an electrostatic driving force for the complexation. The ease, efficiency and integrity of the complexation is highlighted by the formation of nanometric sized cerium oxide particles covered with a well anchored PEG layer, maintaining the characteristics of the original sol. This solvating brush-like layer is sufficient to solubilize the particles and greatly expand the stability range of the original sol up to pH = 9. We underscore two key attributes of the tailored sol: i) strong UV absorption capability after functionalization and ii) ability to re-disperse after freeze-drying as powder in aqueous or organic solvents in varying concentrations as singlet nanocolloids. This robust platform enables translation of intrinsic properties of mineral oxide nanoparticles to critical end use.