• The characteristic properties of the hot nuclear matter existing at the time of fragment formation in the multifragmentation events produced in the reaction $^{64}$Zn + $^{112}$Sn at 40 MeV/nucleon are studied. A kinematical focusing method is employed to determine the multiplicities of evaporated light particles, associated with isotopically identified detected fragments. From these data the primary isotopic yield distributions are reconstructed using a Monte Carlo method. The reconstructed yield distributions are in good agreement with the primary isotope distributions obtained from AMD transport model simulations. Utilizing the reconstructed yields, power distribution, Landau free energy, characteristic properties of the emitting source are examined. The primary mass distributions exhibit a power law distribution with the critical exponent, $A^{-2.3}$, for $A \geq 15$ isotopes, but significantly deviates from that for the lighter isotopes. Landau free energy plots show no strong signature of the first order phase transition. Based on the Modified Fisher Model, the ratios of the Coulomb and symmetry energy coefficients relative to the temperature, $a_{c}/T$ and $a_{sym}/T$, are extracted as a function of A. The extracted $a_{sym}/T$ values are compared with results of the AMD simulations using Gogny interactions with different density dependencies of the symmetry energy term. The calculated $a_{sym}/T$ values show a close relation to the symmetry energy at the density at the time of the fragment formation. From this relation the density of the fragmenting source is determined to be $\rho /\rho_{0} = (0.63 \pm 0.03 )$. Using this density, the symmetry energy coefficient and the temperature of fragmenting source are determined in a self-consistent manner as $a_{sym} = (24.7 \pm 3.4) MeV$ and $T=(4.9 \pm 0.2)$ MeV.
  • For the first time primary hot isotope distributions are experimentally reconstructed in intermediate heavy ion collisions and used with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) calculations to determine density, temperature and symmetry energy coefficient in a self-consistent manner. A kinematical focusing method is employed to reconstruct the primary hot fragment yield distributions for multifragmentation events observed in the reaction system $^{64}$Zn + $^{112}$Sn at 40 MeV/nucleon. The reconstructed yield distributions are in good agreement with the primary isotope distributions of AMD simulations. The experimentally extracted values of the symmetry energy coefficient relative to the temperature, $a_{sym}/T$, are compared with those of the AMD simulations with different density dependence of the symmetry energy term. The calculated $a_{sym}/T$ values changes according to the different interactions. By comparison of the experimental values of $a_{sym}/T$ with those of calculations, the density of the source at fragment formation was determined to be $\rho /\rho_{0} = (0.63 \pm 0.03 )$. Using this density, the symmetry energy coefficient and the temperature are determined in a self-consistent manner as $a_{sym} = (24.7 \pm 1.9) MeV$ and $T=(4.9 \pm 0.2)$ MeV
  • The experimental determination of freeze-out temperatures and densities from the yields of light elements emitted in heavy ion collisions is discussed. Results from different experimental approaches are compared with those of model calculations carried out with and without the inclusion of medium effects. Medium effects become of relevance for baryon densities above $\approx 5 \times 10^{-4}$ fm$^{-3}$. A quantum statistical (QS) model incorporating medium effects is in good agreement with the experimentally derived results at higher densities. A densitometer based on calculated chemical equilibrium constants is proposed.
  • Measurements of the density dependence of the free symmetry energy in low density clustered matter have been extended using the NIMROD multi-detector at Texas A&M University. Thermal coalescence models were employed to extract densities, $\rho$, and temperatures, $T$, for evolving systems formed in collisions of 47 $A$ MeV $^{40}$Ar + $^{112}$Sn,$^{124}$Sn and $^{64}$Zn + $^{112}$Sn, $^{124}$Sn. Densities of $0.03 \leq \rho/\rho_0 \leq 0.2$ and temperatures in the range 5 to 10 MeV have been sampled. The free symmetry energy coefficients are found to be in good agreement with values calculated using a quantum statistical model. Values of the corresponding symmetry energy coefficient are derived from the data using entropies derived from the model.
  • In medium binding energies and Mott points for $d$, $t$, $^3$He and $\alpha$ clusters in low density nuclear matter have been determined at specific combinations of temperature and density in low density nuclear matter produced in collisions of 47$A$ MeV $^{40}$Ar and $^{64}$Zn projectiles with $^{112}$Sn and $^{124}$Sn target nuclei. The experimentally derived values of the in medium modified binding energies are in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions based upon the implementation of Pauli blocking effects in a quantum statistical approach.
  • Clustering in low density nuclear matter has been investigated using the NIMROD multi-detector at Texas A&M University. Thermal coalescence modes were employed to extract densities, $\rho$, and temperatures, $T$, for evolving systems formed in collisions of 47 $A$ MeV $^{40}$Ar + $^{112}$Sn,$^{124}$Sn and $^{64}$Zn + $^{112}$Sn, $^{124}$Sn. The yields of $d$, $t$, $^{3}$He, and $^{4}$He have been determined at $\rho$ = 0.002 to 0.032 nucleons/fm$^{3}$ and $T$= 5 to 10 MeV. The experimentally derived equilibrium constants for $\alpha$ particle production are compared with those predicted by a number of astrophysical equations of state. The data provide important new constraints on the model calculations.
  • Isotope yields have been analyzed within the framework of a Modified Fisher Model to study the power law yield distribution of isotopes in the multifragmentation regime. Using the ratio of the mass dependent symmetry energy coefficient relative to the temperature, $a_{sym}/T$, extracted in previous work and that of the pairing term, $a_{p}/T$, extracted from this work, and assuming that both reflect secondary decay processes, the experimentally observed isotope yields have been corrected for these effects. For a given I = N - Z value, the corrected yields of isotopes relative to the yield of $^{12}C$ show a power law distribution, $Y(N,Z)/Y(^{12}C) \sim A^{-\tau}$, in the mass range of $1 \le A \le 30$ and the distributions are almost identical for the different reactions studied. The observed power law distributions change systematically when I of the isotopes changes and the extracted $\tau$ value decreases from 3.9 to 1.0 as I increases from -1 to 3. These observations are well reproduced by a simple de-excitation model, which the power law distribution of the primary isotopes is determined to $\tau^{prim} = 2.4 \pm 0.2$, suggesting that the disassembling system at the time of the fragment formation is indeed at or very near the critical point.
  • The symmetry energy of nuclear matter is a fundamental ingredient in the investigation of exotic nuclei, heavy-ion collisions and astrophysical phenomena. New data from heavy-ion collisions can be used to extract the free symmetry energy and the internal symmetry energy at subsaturation densities and temperatures below 10 MeV. Conventional theoretical calculations of the symmetry energy based on mean-field approaches fail to give the correct low-temperature, low-density limit that is governed by correlations, in particular by the appearance of bound states. A recently developed quantum statistical (QS) approach that takes the formation of clusters into account predicts symmetry energies that are in very good agreement with the experimental data. A consistent description of the symmetry energy is given that joins the correct low-density limit with quasiparticle approaches valid near the saturation density.
  • We discuss experimental evidence for a nuclear phase transition driven by the different concentration of neutrons to protons. Different ratios of the neutron to proton concentrations lead to different critical points for the phase transition. This is analogous to the phase transitions occurring in 4He-3He liquid mixtures. We present experimental results which reveal the N/A (or Z/A) dependence of the phase transition and discuss possible implications of these observations in terms of the Landau Free Energy description of critical phenomena.
  • Isoscaling is derived within a recently proposed modified Fisher model where the free energy near the critical point is described by the Landau O(m^6) theory. In this model m = (N-Z)/A is the order parameter, a consequence of (one of) the symmetries of the nuclear Hamiltonian. Within this framework we show that isoscaling depends mainly on this order parameter through the 'external (conjugate) field' H. The external field is just given by the difference in chemical potentials of the neutrons and protons of the two sources. To distinguish from previously employed isoscaling relationships, this approach is dubbed: m - scaling. We discuss the relationship between this framework and the standard isoscaling formalism and point out some substantial differences in interpretation of experimental results which might result. These should be investigated further both theoretically and experimentally.
  • The ratio of the symmetry energy coefficient to temperature, $a_sym/T$, in Fermi energy heavy ion collisions, has been experimentally extracted as a function of the fragment atomic number using isoscaling parameters and the variance of the isotope distributions. The extracted values have been compared to the results of calculations made with an Antisymmetrized Molecular Dynamics (AMD) model employing a statistical decay code to account for deexcitation of excited primary fragments. The experimental values are in good agreement with the values calculated but are significantly different from those characterizing the yields of the primary AMD fragments.
  • The relative isobaric yields of fragments produced in a series of heavy ion induced multifragmentation reactions have been analyzed in the framework of a Modified Fisher Model, primarily to determine the ratio of the symmetry energy coefficient to the temperature, $a_a/T$, as a function of fragment mass A. The extracted values increase from 5 to ~16 as A increases from 9 to 37. These values have been compared to the results of calculations using the Antisymmetrized Molecular Dynamics (AMD) model together with the statistical decay code Gemini. The calculated ratios are in good agreement with those extracted from the experiment. In contrast, the ratios determined from fitting the primary fragment distributions from the AMD model calculation are ~ 4 and show little variation with A. This observation indicates that the value of the symmetry energy coefficient derived from final fragment observables may be significantly different than the actual value at the time of fragment formation. The experimentally observed pairing effect is also studied within the same simulations. The Coulomb coefficient is also discussed.
  • We explore the abundance of light clusters in asymmetric nuclear matter at subsaturation density. With increasing density, binding energies and wave functions are modified due to medium effects. The method of Albergo, Costa, Costanzo and Rubbino (ACCR) for determining the temperature and free nucleon density of a disassembling hot nuclear source from fragment yields is modified to include, in addition to Coulomb effects and flow, also effects of medium modifications of cluster properties, which become of importance when the nuclear matter density is above 10$^{-3}$ fm$^{-3}$. We show how the analysis of cluster yields, to infer temperature and nucleon densities, is modified if the shifts in binding energies of in medium clusters are included. While, at low densities, the temperature calculated from given yields changes only modestly if medium effects are taken into account, larger discrepancies are observed when the nucleon densities are determined from measured yields.
  • In their ground states, atomic nuclei are quantum Fermi liquids. At finite temperatures and low densities, these nuclei may undergo a phase change similar to, but substantially different from, a classical liquid gas phase transition. As in the classical case, temperature is the control parameter while density and pressure are the conjugate variables. At variance with the classical case, in the nucleus the difference between the proton and neutron concentrations acts as an additional order parameter, for which the symmetry potential is the conjugate variable. Different ratios of the neutron to proton concentrations lead to different critical points for the phase transition. This is analogous to the phase transitions occurring in $^{4}$He-$^{3}$He liquid mixtures. We present experimental results which reveal the N/Z dependence of the phase transition and discuss possible implications of these observations in terms of the Landau Free Energy description of critical phenomena.
  • Experimental analyses of moderate temperature nuclear gases produced in the violent collisions of 35 MeV/nucleon$^{64}$Zn projectiles with $^{92}$Mo and $^{197}$Au target nuclei reveal a large degree of alpha particle clustering at low densities. For these gases, temperature and density dependent symmetry energy coefficients have been derived from isoscaling analyses of the yields of nuclei with A $\leq 4$. At densities of 0.01 to 0.05 times the ground state density of symmetric nuclear matter, the temperature and density dependent symmetry energies are 10.7 to 13.5 MeV. These values are much larger than those obtained in mean field calculations. They are in quite good agreement with results of a recently proposed Virial Equation of State calculation.
  • The sizes, temperatures and free neutron to proton ratios of the initial interaction zones produced in the collisions of 40 MeV/nucleon $^{40}$Ar + $^{112}$Sn and 55 MeV/nucleon$^{27}$Al + $^{124}$Sn are derived using total detected neutron plus charged particle multiplicity as a measure of the impact parameter range and number of participant nucleons. The size of the initial interaction zone, determined from a coalescence model analysis, increases significantly with decreasing impact parameter. The temperatures and free neutron to proton ratios in the interaction zones are relatively similar for different impact parameter ranges and evolve in a similar fashion.
  • An extensive experimental survey of the features of the disassembly of a small quasi-projectile system with $A \sim$ 36, produced in the reactions of 47 MeV/nucleon $^{40}$Ar + $^{27}$Al, $^{48}$Ti and $^{58}$Ni, has been carried out. Nuclei in the excitation energy range of 1-9 MeV/u have been investigated employing a new method to reconstruct the quasi-projectile source. At an excitation energy $\sim$ 5.6 MeV/nucleon many observables indicate the presence of maximal fluctuations in the de-excitation processes. The fragment topological structure shows that the rank sorted fragments obey Zipf's law at the point of largest fluctuations providing another indication of a liquid gas phase transition. The caloric curve for this system shows a monotonic increase of temperature with excitation energy and no apparent plateau. The temperature at the point of maximal fluctuations is $8.3 \pm 0.5$ MeV. Taking this temperature as the critical temperature and employing the caloric curve information we have extracted the critical exponents $\beta$, $\gamma$ and $\sigma$ from the data. Their values are also consistent with the values of the universality class of the liquid gas phase transition. Taken together, this body of evidence strongly suggests a phase change in an equilibrated mesoscopic system at, or extremely close to, the critical point.
  • The kinetic energy variation of emitted light clusters has been employed as a clock to explore the time evolution of the temperature for thermalizing composite systems produced in the reactions of 26A, 35A and 47A MeV $^{64}$Zn with $^{58}$Ni, $^{92}$Mo and $^{197}$Au. For each system investigated, the double isotope ratio temperature curve exhibits a high maximum apparent temperature, in the range of 10-25 MeV, at high ejectile velocity. These maximum values increase with increasing projectile energy and decrease with increasing target mass. The time at which the maximum in the temperature curve is reached ranges from 80 to 130 fm/c after contact. For each different target, the subsequent cooling curves for all three projectile energies are quite similar. Temperatures comparable to those of limiting temperature systematics are reached 30 to 40 fm/c after the times corresponding to the maxima, at a time when AMD-V transport model calculations predict entry into the final evaporative or fragmentation stage of de-excitation of the hot composite systems. Evidence for the establishment of thermal and chemical equilibrium is discussed.
  • Calorimetric and coalescence techniques have been employed to probe equilibration for hot nuclei produced in heavy ion collisions of 35 to 55 MeV/u projectiles with medium mass targets. Entrance channel mass asymmetries and energies were selected in order that very hot composite nuclei of similar mass and excitation would remain after early stage pre-equilibrium particle emission. Inter-comparison of the properties and de-excitation patterns for these different systems provides evidence for the production of hot nuclei with decay patterns relatively independent of the specific entrance channel.
  • The critical behavior for the light nuclei with A$\sim 36$ has been investigated experimentally by the NIMROD multi-detectors. The wide variety of observables indicate the critical point has been reached in the disassembly of hot nuclei at an excitation energy of 5.6$\pm$0.5 MeV/u.
  • The reaction systems, 64Zn + 58Ni, 64Zn + 92Mo, 64Zn + 197Au, at 26A, 35A and 47A MeV, have been studied both in experiments with a 4$\pi$ detector array, NIMROD, and with Antisymmetrized Molecular Dynamics model calculations employing effective interactions corresponding to soft and stiff equations of state (EOS). Direct experimental observables, such as multiplicity distributions, charge distributions, energy spectra and velocity spectra, have been compared in detail with those of the calculations and a reasonable agreement is obtained. The velocity distributions of $\alpha$ particles and fragments with Z >= 3 show distinct differences in calculations with the soft EOS and the stiff EOS. The velocity distributions of $\alpha$ particle and Intermediate Mass Fragments (IMF's) are best described by the stiff EOS. Neither of the above direct observables nor the strength of the elliptic flow are sensitive to changes in the in-medium nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections. A detailed analysis of the central collision events calculated with the stiff EOS revealed that multifragmentation with cold fragment emission is a common feature predicted for all reactions studied here. A possible multifragmentation scenario is presented; after the preequilibrium emission ceases in the composite system, cold light fragments are formed in a hotter gas of nucleons and stay cold until the composite system underdoes multifragmentation. For reaction with 197Au at 47A MeV a significant radial expansion takes place. For reactions with 58Ni and 92Mo at 47A MeV semi-transparency becomes prominent. The differing reaction dynamics drastically change the kinematic characteristics of emitted fragments. This scenario gives consistent explanations for many existing experimental results in the Fermi energy domain.
  • A wide variety of observables indicate that maximal fluctuations in the disassembly of hot nuclei with A ~ 36 occur at an excitation energy of 5.6 +- 0.5 MeV/u and temperature of 8.3 +- 0.5 MeV. Associated with this point of maximal fluctuations are a number of quantitative indicators of apparent critical behavior. The associated caloric curve does not appear to show a flattening such as that seen for heavier systems. This suggests that, in contrast to similar signals seen for liquid-gas transitions in heavier nuclei, the observed behavior in these very light nuclei is associated with a transition much closer to the critical point.
  • For nuclei in five different mass regions the critical temperatures, at which the surface tension vanishes, are derived from information on the liquid branch of the coexistence curve. These critical temperatures increase with increasing mass and, for higher masses are well above recently reported critical temperatures obtained from Fisher Droplet model and percolation model analyses. However, for the lowest mass region nuclei, with 30<A<60, this analysis indicates that nucleonic matter has been produced essentially at the critical point, characterized by Tc and rho_c.
  • Nuclear caloric curves have been analyzed using an expanding Fermi gas hypothesis to extract average nuclear densities. In this approach the observed flattening of the caloric curves reflects progressively increasing expansion with increasing excitation energy. This expansion results in a corresponding decrease in the density and Fermi energy of the excited system. For nuclei of medium to heavy mass apparent densities ~ 0.4 rho_0 are reached at the higher excitation energies.
  • From experimental observations of limiting temperatures in heavy ion collisions we derive Tc, the critical temperature of infinite nuclear matter. The critical temperature is 16.6 +- 0.86 MeV. Theoretical model correlations between Tc, the compressibility modulus, K the effective mass, $m^*$ and the saturation density, rho_s, are exploited to derive the quantity (K/m^*)**1/2*rho_s^{-1/3}$. This quantity together with calculations employing Skyrme and Gogny interactions indicates a nuclear matter incompressibility in moderately excited nuclei that is in excellent agreement with the value determined from Giant Monopole Resonance data. This technique of extraction of K may prove particularly useful in investigations of very neutron rich systems using radioactive beams.