• If the boundary conditions of the quantum vacuum are changed in time, quantum field theory predicts that real, observable particles can be created in the initially empty modes. Here, we realize this effect by changing the boundary conditions of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate, which yields a population of initially unoccupied spatial and spin excitations. We prove that the excitations are created as entangled excitation pairs by certifying continuous-variable entanglement within the many-particle output state.
  • We analyze the static and dynamical properties of a one-dimensional topological lattice, the fermionic Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model, in the presence of on-site interactions. Based on a study of charge and spin correlation functions, we elucidate the nature of the topological edge modes, which depending on the sign of the interactions, either display particles of opposite spin on opposite edges, or a pair and a holon. This study of correlation functions also highlights the strong entanglement that exists between the opposite edges of the system. This last feature has remarkable consequences upon subjecting the system to a quench, where an instantaneous edge-to-edge signal appears in the correlation functions characterizing the edge modes. Besides, other correlation functions are shown to propagate in the bulk according to the light-cone imposed by the Lieb-Robinson bound. Our study reveals how one-dimensional lattices exhibiting entangled topological edge modes allow for a non-trivial correlation spreading, while providing an accessible platform to detect spin-charge separation using state-of-the-art experimental techniques.
  • The transport of excitations between pinned particles in many physical systems may be mapped to single-particle models with power-law hopping, $1/r^a$. For randomly spaced particles, these models present an effective peculiar disorder that leads to surprising localization properties. We show that in one-dimensional systems almost all eigenstates (except for a few states close to the ground state) are power-law localized for any value of $a>0$. Moreover, we show that our model is an example of a new universality class of models with power-law hopping, characterized by a duality between systems with long-range hops ($a<1$) and short-range hops ($a>1$) in which the wave function amplitude falls off algebraically with the same power $\gamma$ from the localization center.
  • Strongly interacting one-dimensional (1D) Bose-Fermi mixtures form a tunable XXZ spin chain. Within the spin-chain model developed here, all properties of these systems can be calculated from states representing the ordering of the bosons and fermions within the atom chain and from the ground-state wave function of spinless noninteracting fermions. We validate the model by means of an exact diagonalization of the full few-body Hamiltonian in the strongly interacting regime. Using the model, we explore the phase diagram of the atom chain as a function of the boson-boson (BB) and boson-fermion (BF) interaction strengths and calculate the densities, momentum distributions, and trap-level occupancies for up to 17 particles. In particular, we find antiferromagnetic (AFM) and ferromagnetic (FM) order and a demixing of the bosons and fermions in certain interaction regimes. We find, however, no demixing for equally strong BB and BF interactions in agreement with earlier calculations that combined the Bethe ansatz with a local-density approximation.
  • Ultra-cold bosons in zig-zag optical lattices present a rich physics due to the interplay between frustration, induced by lattice geometry, two-body interaction and three-body constraint. Unconstrained bosons may develop chiral superfluidity and a Mott-insulator even at vanishingly small interactions. Bosons with a three-body constraint allow for a Haldane-insulator phase in non-polar gases, as well as pair-superfluidity and density wave phases for attractive interactions. These phases may be created and detected within the current state of the art techniques.
  • In a joint experimental and theoretical effort, we report on the formation of a macro-droplet state in an ultracold bosonic gas of erbium atoms with strong dipolar interactions. By precise tuning of the s-wave scattering length below the so-called dipolar length, we observe a smooth crossover of the ground state from a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) to a dense macro-droplet state of more than $10^4$ atoms. Based on the study of collective excitations and loss features, we quantitative prove that quantum fluctuations stabilize the ultracold gas far beyond the instability threshold imposed by mean-field interactions. Finally, we perform expansion measurements, showing the evolution of the normal BEC towards a three-dimensional self-bound state and show that the interplay between quantum stabilization and three-body losses gives rise to a minimal expansion velocity at a finite scattering length.
  • Recent experiments have revealed the formation of stable droplets in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates. This surprising result has been explained by the stabilization given by quantum fluctuations. We study in detail the properties of a BEC in the presence of quantum stabilization. The ground-state phase diagram presents three main regimes: mean-field regime, in which the quantum correction is perturbative, droplet regime, in which quantum stabilization is crucial, and a multi-stable regime. In the absence of a multi-stable region, the condensate undergoes a crossover from the mean-field to the droplet solution marked by a characteristic growth of the peak density that may be employed to clearly distinguish quantum stabilization from other stabilization mechanisms. Interestingly quantum stabilization allows for three-dimensionally self-bound condensates. We characterized these self-bound solutions, and discuss their realization in experiments. We conclude with a discussion of the lowest-lying excitations both for trapped condensates, and for self-bound solutions.
  • Since the pioneering work of Ramsey, atom interferometers are employed for precision metrology, in particular to measure time and to realize the second. In a classical interferometer, an ensemble of atoms is prepared in one of the two input states, whereas the second one is left empty. In this case, the vacuum noise restricts the precision of the interferometer to the standard quantum limit (SQL). Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel clock configuration that surpasses the SQL by squeezing the vacuum in the empty input state. We create a squeezed vacuum state containing an average of 0.75 atoms to improve the clock sensitivity of 10,000 atoms by 2.05 dB. The SQL poses a significant limitation for today's microwave fountain clocks, which serve as the main time reference. We evaluate the major technical limitations and challenges for devising a next generation of fountain clocks based on atomic squeezed vacuum.
  • We consider dipolar excitations propagating via dipole-induced exchange among immobile molecules randomly spaced in a lattice. The character of the propagation is determined by long-range hops (Levy flights). We analyze the eigen-energy spectra and the multifractal structure of the wavefunctions. In 1D and 2D all states are localized, although in 2D the localization length can be extremely large leading to an effective localization-delocalization crossover in realistic systems. In 3D all eigenstates are extended but not always ergodic, and we identify the energy intervals of ergodic and non-ergodic states. The reduction of the lattice filling induces an ergodic to non-ergodic transition, and the excitations are mostly non-ergodic at low filling.
  • Collapse in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates may be arrested by quantum fluctuations. Due to the anisotropy of the dipole-dipole interactions, the dipole-driven collapse induced by soft excitations is compensated by the repulsive Lee-Huang-Yang contribution resulting from quantum fluctuations of hard excitations, in a similar mechanism as that recently proposed for Bose-Bose mixtures. The arrested collapse results in self-bound filament-like droplets, providing an explanation to recent dysprosium experiments. Arrested instability and droplet formation are novel general features directly linked to the nature of the dipole-dipole interactions, and should hence play an important role in all future experiments with strongly dipolar gases.
  • In 1935, Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) questioned the completeness of quantum mechanics by devising a quantum state of two massive particles with maximally correlated space and momentum coordinates. The EPR criterion qualifies such continuous-variable entangled states, where a measurement of one subsystem seemingly allows for a prediction of the second subsystem beyond the Heisenberg uncertainty relation. Up to now, continuous-variable EPR correlations have only been created with photons, while the demonstration of such strongly correlated states with massive particles is still outstanding. Here, we report on the creation of an EPR-correlated two-mode squeezed state in an ultracold atomic ensemble. The state shows an EPR entanglement parameter of 0.18(3), which is 2.4 standard deviations below the threshold 1/4 of the EPR criterion. We also present a full tomographic reconstruction of the underlying many-particle quantum state. The state presents a resource for tests of quantum nonlocality and a wide variety of applications in the field of continuous-variable quantum information and metrology.
  • The absence of energy dissipation leads to an intriguing out-of-equilibrium dynamics for ultracold polar gases in optical lattices, characterized by the formation of dynamically-bound on-site and inter-site clusters of two or more particles, and by an effective blockade repulsion. These effects combined with the controlled preparation of initial states available in cold gases experiments can be employed to create interesting out-of-equilibrium states. These include quasi-equilibrated effectively repulsive 1D gases for attractive dipolar interactions and dynamically-bound crystals. Furthermore, non-equilibrium polar lattice gases can offer a promising scenario for the study of many-body localization in the absence of quenched disorder. This fascinating out-of-equilibrium dynamics for ultra-cold polar gases in optical lattices may be accessible in on-going experiments.
  • Quantum mechanics predicts that our physical reality is influenced by events that can potentially happen but factually do not occur. Interaction-free measurements (IFMs) exploit this counterintuitive influence to detect the presence of an object without requiring any interaction with it. Here we propose and realize an IFM concept based on an unstable many-particle system. In our experiments, we employ an ultracold gas in an unstable spin configuration which can undergo a rapid decay. The object - realized by a laser beam - prevents this decay due to the indirect quantum Zeno effect and thus, its presence can be detected without interacting with a single atom. Contrary to existing proposals, our IFM does not require single-particle sources and is only weakly affected by losses and decoherence. We demonstrate confidence levels of 90%, well beyond previous optical experiments.
  • Optimal control theory has been employed to populate separately two dark states of the acetylene polyad $N_s=1$, $N_r=5$ by indirect coupling via the ground state. Relevant level energies and transition dipole moments are extracted from the experimental literature. The optimal pulses are rather simple. The evolution of the populations is shown for the duration of the control process and also for the field free-evolution that follows the control. One of the dark states appears to be a potential target for realistic experimental investigation because the average population of the Rabi oscillation remains high and decoherence is expected to be weak.
  • The measured CMB angular distribution shows a great consistency with the LCDM model. However, isotropy violations were reported in CMB temperature maps of both WMAP and Planck data. We investigate the influence of different masks employed in the analysis of CMB angular distribution, in particular in the excess of power in the Southeastern quadrant (SEQ) and the lack of power in the Northeastern quadrant (NEQ). We compare the two-point correlation function (TPCF) computed for each quadrant of the CMB foreground-cleaned temperature maps to 1000 simulations generated assuming the LCDM best-fit power spectrum using four different masks. In addition to the quadrants, we computed the TPCF for circular regions in the map where the excess and lack of power are present. We also compare the effect of Galactic cuts in the TPCF calculations as compared to the simulations. We found consistent results for three masks, namely mask-rulerminimal, U73 and U66. The results indicate that the excess of power in the SEQ tends to vanish as the portion of the sky covered by the mask increases and the lack of power in the NEQ remains virtually unchanged. When UT78 mask is applied, the NEQ becomes no longer anomalous and the excess of power in the SEQ becomes the most significant one among the masks. Nevertheless, the asymmetry between the SEQ and NEQ is independent of the mask and it is in disagreement with the isotropic model with at least 95% C.L. We find that UT78 is in disagreement with the other analysed masks, specially considering the SEQ and the NEQ individual analysis. Most importantly, the use of UT78 washes out the anomaly in the NEQ. Furthermore, we found excess of kurtosis, compared with simulations, in the NEQ for the regions not masked by UT78 but masked by the other masks, indicating that the previous result could be due to non-removed residual foregrounds by UT78.
  • We theoretically explore atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) subject to position-dependent spin-orbit coupling (SOC). This SOC can be produced by cyclically laser coupling four internal atomic ground (or metastable) states in an environment where the detuning from resonance depends on position. The resulting spin-orbit coupled BEC phase-separates into domains, each of which contain density modulations - stripes - aligned either along the x or y direction. In each domain, the stripe orientation is determined by the sign of the local detuning. When these stripes have mismatched spatial periods along domain boundaries, non-trivial topological spin textures form at the interface, including skyrmions-like spin vortices and anti-vortices. In contrast to vortices present in conventional rotating BECs, these spin-vortices are stable topological defects that are not present in the corresponding homogenous stripe-phase spin-orbit coupled BECs.
  • We show that density-dependent synthetic gauge fields may be engineered by combining periodically modu- lated interactions and Raman-assisted hopping in spin-dependent optical lattices. These fields lead to a density- dependent shift of the momentum distribution, may induce superfluid-to-Mott insulator transitions, and strongly modify correlations in the superfluid regime. We show that the interplay between the created gauge field and the broken sublattice symmetry results, as well, in an intriguing behavior at vanishing interactions, characterized by the appearance of a fractional Mott insulator.
  • We show that strongly interacting multicomponent gases in one dimension realize an effective spin chain, offering an alternative simple scenario for the study of one-dimensional quantum magnetism in cold gases in the absence of an optical lattice. The spin-chain model allows for an intuitive understanding of recent experiments and for a simple calculation of relevant observables. We analyze the adiabatic preparation of antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ground states, and show that many-body spin states may be efficiently probed in tunneling experiments. The spin-chain model is valid for more than two components, opening the possibility of realizing SU(N) quantum magnetism in strongly interacting one-dimensional alkaline-earth-metal or ytterbium Fermi gases.
  • Using a combination of results from exact mappings and from mean-field theory we explore the phase diagram of quasi-one-dimensional systems of identical fermions with attractive dipolar interactions. We demonstrate that at low density these systems provide a realization of a single-component one-dimensional Fermi gas with a generalized contact interaction. Using an exact duality between one-dimensional Fermi and Bose gases, we show that when the dipole moment is strong enough, bound many-body states exist, and we calculate the critical coupling strength for the emergence of these states. At higher densities, the Hartree-Fock approximation is accurate, and by combining the two approaches we determine the structure of the phase diagram. The many-body bound states should be accessible in future experiments with ultracold polar molecules.
  • Dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates may present a rotonlike dispersion minimum, which has yet to be observed in experiments. We discuss a simple method to reveal roton excitations, based on the response of quasi-two-dimensional dipolar condensates against a weak lattice potential. By employing numerical simulations for realistic scenarios, we analyze the response of the system as a function of both the lattice spacing and the s-wave scattering length, showing that the roton minimum may be readily revealed in current experiments by the resonant population of Bragg peaks in time-of-flight measurements.
  • We present an analytical model for the theoretical analysis of spin dynamics and spontaneous symmetry breaking in a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). This allows for an excellent intuitive understanding of the processes and provides good quantitative agreement with experimental results in Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 135302 (2010). It is shown that the dynamics of a spinor BEC initially prepared in an unstable Zeeman state mF=0 (|0>) can be understood by approximating the effective trapping potential for the state |+-1> with a cylindrical box potential. The resonances in the creation efficiency of these atom pairs can be traced back to excitation modes of this confinement. The understanding of these excitation modes allows for a detailed characterization of the symmetry breaking mechanism, showing how a twofold spontaneous breaking of spatial and spin symmetry can occur. In addition a detailed account of the experimental methods for the preparation and analysis of spinor quantum gases is given.
  • Two-component dipolar fermions in zigzag optical lattices allow for the engineering of spin-orbital models. We show that dipolar lattice fermions permit the exploration of a regime typically unavailable in solid-state compounds that is characterized by a novel spin-liquid phase with a finite magnetization and spontaneously broken SU(2) symmetry. This peculiar spin liquid may be understood as a Luttinger liquid of composite particles consisting of bound states of spin waves and orbital domain walls moving in an unsaturated ferromagnetic background. In addition, we show that the system exhibits a boundary phase transitions involving non-local entanglement of edge spins.
  • Roton excitations constitute a key feature of dipolar gases, connecting these gases with superfluid helium. We show that the density dependence of the roton minimum results in a spatial roton confinement, particularly relevant in pancake dipolar condensates with large aspect ratios. We show that roton confinement plays a crucial role in the dynamics after roton instability, and that arresting the instability may create a trapped roton gas revealed by confined density modulations. We discuss the local susceptibility against density perturbations, which we illustrate for the case of vortices. Roton confinement is expected to play a key role in experiments.
  • We study the ground-state phase diagram of two-component fermions loaded in a ladder-like lattice at half filling in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. For repulsive fermions with unidirectional spin-orbit coupling along the legs we identify a N\'{e}el state which is separated from rung-singlet and ferromagnetic states by Ising phase transition lines. These lines cross for maximal spin-orbit coupling and a direct Gaussian phase transition between rung-singlet and ferro phases is realized. For the case of Rashba-like spin-orbit coupling, besides the rung singlet phases two distinct striped ferromagnetic phases are formed. In case of attractive fermions with spin-orbit coupling at half-filling for decoupled chains we identify a dimerized state that separates a singlet superconductor and a ferromagnetic states.
  • The extended Bose-Hubbard model subjected to a disordered potential is predicted to display a rich phase diagram. In the case of uniform random disorder one finds two insulating quantum phases -- the Mott-insulator and the Haldane insulator -- in addition to a superfluid and a Bose glass phase. In the case of a quasiperiodic potential further phases are found, eg the incommensurate density wave, adiabatically connected to the Haldane insulator. For the case of weak random disorder we determine the phase boundaries using a perturbative bosonization approach. We then calculate the entanglement spectrum for both types of disorder, showing that it provides a good indication of the various phases.