• Crystal electric field states in rare earth intermetallics show an intricate entanglement with the many-body physics that occurs in these systems and that is known to lead to a plethora of electronic phases. Here, we attempt to trace different contributions to the crystal electric field (CEF) splittings in CeIrIn$_5$, a heavy-fermion compound and member of the Ce$M$In$_5$ ($M$= Co, Rh, Ir) family. To this end, we utilize high-resolution resonant angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and present a spectroscopic study of the electronic structure of this unconventional superconductor over a wide temperature range. As a result, we show how ARPES can be used in combination with thermodynamic measurements or neutron scattering to disentangle different contributions to the CEF splitting in rare earth intermetallics. We also find that the hybridization is stronger in CeIrIn$_5$ than CeCoIn$_5$ and the effects of the hybridization on the Fermi volume increase is much smaller than predicted. By providing the first experimental evidence for $4f_{7/2}^{1}$ splittings which, in CeIrIn$_5$, split the octet into four doublets, we clearly demonstrate the many-body origin of the so-called $4f_{7/2}^{1}$ state.
  • A key issue in heavy fermion research is how subtle changes in the hybridization between the 4$f$ (5$f$) and conduction electrons can result in fundamentally different ground states. CeRhIn$_5$ stands out as a particularly notable example: replacing Rh by either Co or Ir, located above or below Rh in the periodic table, antiferromagnetism gives way to superconductivity. In this photoemission study of CeRhIn$_5$, we demonstrate that the use of resonant ARPES with polarized light allows to extract detailed information on the 4$f$ crystal field states and details on the 4$f$ and conduction electron hybridization which together determine the ground state. We directly observe weakly dispersive Kondo resonances of $f$-electrons and identify two of the three Ce $4f_{5/2}^{1}$ crystal-electric-field levels and band-dependent hybridization, which signals that the hybridization occurs primarily between the Ce $4f$ states in the CeIn$_3$ layer and two more three-dimensional bands composed of the Rh $4d$ and In $5p$ orbitals in the RhIn$_2$ layer. Our results allow to connect the properties observed at elevated temperatures with the unusual low-temperature properties of this enigmatic heavy fermion compound.
  • Bulk FeSe is superconducting with a critical temperature $T_c$ $\cong$ 8 K and SrTiO$_3$ is insulating in nature, yet high-temperature superconductivity has been reported at the interface between a single-layer FeSe and SrTiO$_3$. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements observe a gap opening at the Fermi surface below $\approx$ 60 K. Elucidating the microscopic properties and understanding the pairing mechanism of single-layer FeSe is of utmost importance as it is a basic building block of iron-based superconductors. Here, we use the low-energy muon spin rotation/relaxation technique (LE-$\mu$SR) to detect and quantify the supercarrier density and determine the gap symmetry in FeSe grown on SrTiO$_3$ (100). Measurements in applied field show a temperature dependent broadening of the field distribution below $\sim$ 60 K, reflecting the superconducting transition and formation of a vortex state. Zero field measurements rule out the presence of magnetism of static or fluctuating origin. From the inhomogeneous field distribution, we determine an effective sheet supercarrier density $n_s^{2D} \simeq 6 \times 10^{14}$ cm$^{-2}$ at $T \rightarrow 0$ K, which is a factor of 4 larger than expected from ARPES measurements of the excess electron count per Fe of 1 monolayer (ML) FeSe. The temperature dependence of the superfluid density $n_s(T)$ can be well described down to $\sim$ 10 K by simple s-wave BCS, indicating a rather clean superconducting phase with a gap of 10.2(1.1) meV. The result is a clear indication of the gradual formation of a two dimensional vortex lattice existing over the entire large FeSe/STO interface and provides unambiguous evidence for robust superconductivity below 60 K in ultrathin FeSe.
  • Heavy fermion materials gain high electronic masses and expand Fermi surfaces when the high-temperature localized f electrons become itinerant and hybridize with the conduction band at low temperatures. However, despite the common application of this model, direct microscopic verification remains lacking. Here we report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on CeCoIn5, a prototypical heavy fermion compound, and reveal the long-sought band hybridization and Fermi surface expansion. Unexpectedly, the localized-to-itinerant transition occurs at surprisingly high temperatures, yet f electrons are still largely localized at the lowest temperature. Moreover, crystal field excitations likely play an important role in the anomalous temperature dependence. Our results paint an comprehensive unanticipated experimental picture of the heavy fermion formation in a periodic multi-level Anderson/Kondo lattice, and set the stage for understanding the emergent properties in related materials.
  • The neutron spin resonance is a collective magnetic excitation that appears in copper oxide, iron pnictide, and heavy fermion unconventional superconductors. Although the resonance is commonly associated with a spin-exciton due to the $d$($s^{\pm}$)-wave symmetry of the superconducting order parameter, it has also been proposed to be a magnon-like excitation appearing in the superconducting state. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to demonstrate that the resonance in the heavy fermion superconductor Ce$_{1-x}$Yb$_{x}$CoIn$_5$ with $x=0,0.05,0.3$ has a ring-like upward dispersion that is robust against Yb-doping. By comparing our experimental data with random phase approximation calculation using the electronic structure and the momentum dependence of the $d_{x^2-y^2}$-wave superconducting gap determined from scanning tunneling microscopy for CeCoIn$_5$, we conclude the robust upward dispersing resonance mode in Ce$_{1-x}$Yb$_{x}$CoIn$_5$ is inconsistent with the downward dispersion predicted within the spin-exciton scenario.
  • In heavy-fermion superconductor Ce$_{1-x}$Yb$_x$CoIn$_5$ system, Yb doping was reported to cause a possible change from nodal $d$-wave superconductivity to a fully gapped $d$-wave molecular superfluid of composite pairs near $x \approx$ 0.07 (nominal value $x_{nom}$ = 0.2). Here we present systematic thermal conductivity measurements on Ce$_{1-x}$Yb$_x$CoIn$_5$ ($x$ = 0.013, 0.084, and 0.163) single crystals. The observed finite residual linear term $\kappa_0/T$ is insensitive to Yb doping, verifying the universal heat conduction of nodal $d$-wave superconducting gap in Ce$_{1-x}$Yb$_x$CoIn$_5$. Similar universal heat conduction is also observed in CeCo(In$_{1-y}$Cd$_y$)$_5$ system. These results reveal robust nodal $d$-wave gap in CeCoIn$_5$ upon Yb or Cd doping.
  • Measurements of physical properties show that Yb enters the single crystals systematically and in registry with the nominal Yb concentration x of the starting material dissolved in the molten indium flux.
  • A method for deterministic control of the magnetic order parameter using an electrical stimulus is highly desired for the new generation of spintronic and magnetoelectronic devices. Much effort has been focused on magnetic domain-wall motion manipulated by a successive injection of spin-polarized current into a magnetic nanostructure. However, an integrant high-threshold current density of 107~108 A/cm2 inhibits the integration of those nanostructures with low-energy-cost technology. In addition, a precise determination of the location of domain walls at nanoscale seems difficult in artificially manufactured nanostructures. Here we report an approach to manipulate a single magnetic domain wall with a perpendicular anisotropy in a manganite/dielectric/metal capacitor using a probe-induced spin displacement. A spin angular momentum transfer torque occurs in the strongly correlated manganite film during the spin injection into the capacitor from the nanoscale magnetized tip with an ultralow voltage of 0.1 V, where the threshold spin-polarized current density is ~104 A/cm2 at the tip/manganite interface. The probe-voltage-controlled domain wall motion in the capacitor demonstrates a critical framework for the fundamental understanding of the manipulation of the nano-magnet systems with low energy consumption.
  • We report measurements of electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, and thermoelectric power on the system Pr1-xCexPt4Ge12. Superconductivity is suppressed with increasing Ce concentration up to x = 0.5, above which there is no evidence for superconductivity down to 1.1 K. The Sommerfeld coefficient {\gamma} increases with increasing x from 48 mJ/mol K^2 up to 120 mJ/mol K^2 at x = 0.5, indicating an increase in strength of electronic correlations. The temperature dependence of the specific heat at low temperatures evolves from roughly T^3 for x = 0 to e^(-\Delta /T) behavior for x = 0.05 and above, suggesting a crossover from a nodal to a nodeless superconducting energy gap or a transition from multiband to single-band superconductivity. Fermi-liquid behavior is observed throughout the series in low-temperature magnetization, specific heat, and electrical resistivity measurements.
  • The electronic structure of (Ce,Yb)CoIn5 has been studied by a combination of photoemission, x-ray absorption and bulk property measurements. Previous findings of a Ce valence near 3+ for all x and of an Yb valence near 2.3+ for x>0.3 were confirmed. One new result of this study is that the Yb valence for x<0.2 increases rapidly with decreasing x from 2.3+ toward 3+, which correlates well with de Haas van Alphen results showing a change of Fermi surface around x=0.2. Another new result is the direct observation by angle resolved photoemission Fermi surface maps of about 50% cross sectional area reductions of the \alpha- and \beta-sheets for x=1 compared to x=0, and a smaller, essentially proportionate, size change of the \alpha-sheet for x=0.2. These changes are found to be in good general agreement with expectations from simple electron counting. The implications of these results for the unusual robustness of superconductivity and Kondo coherence with increasing x in this alloy system are discussed.
  • One of the greatest challenges to Landau's Fermi liquid theory - the standard theory of metals - is presented by complex materials with strong electronic correlations. In these materials, non-Fermi liquid transport and thermodynamic properties are often explained by the presence of a continuous quantum phase transition which happens at a quantum critical point (QCP). A QCP can be revealed by applying pressure, magnetic field, or changing the chemical composition. In the heavy-fermion compound CeCoIn$_5$, the QCP is assumed to play a decisive role in defining the microscopic structure of both normal and superconducting states. However, the question of whether QCP must be present in the material's phase diagram to induce non-Fermi liquid behavior and trigger superconductivity remains open. Here we show that the full suppression of the field-induced QCP in CeCoIn$_5$ by doping with Yb has surprisingly little impact on both unconventional superconductivity and non-Fermi liquid behavior. This implies that the non-Fermi liquid metallic behavior could be a new state of matter in its own right rather then a consequence of the underlying quantum phase transition.
  • Single crystals of the compounds LaFePO, PrFePO, and NdFePO have been prepared by means of a flux growth technique and studied by electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements. We have found that PrFePO and NdFePO display superconductivity with values of the superconducting critical temperature T_c of 3.2 K and 3.1 K, respectively. The effect of annealing on the properties of LaFePO, PrFePO, and NdFePO is also reported. The LnFePO (Ln = lanthanide) compounds are isostructural with the LnFeAsO_{1-x}F_x compounds that become superconducting with T_c values as high as 55 K for Ln = Sm. A systematic comparison of the occurrence of superconductivity in the series LnFePO and LnFeAsO_{1-x}F_x points to a possible difference in the origin of the superconductivity in these two series of compounds.
  • We have measured the temperature dependence and magnitude of the superfluid density $\rho_{\rm s}(T)$ via the magnetic field penetration depth $\lambda(T)$ in PuCoGa$_5$ (nominal critical temperature $T_{c0} = 18.5$ K) using the muon spin rotation technique in order to investigate the symmetry of the order parameter, and to study the effects of aging on the superconducting properties of a radioactive material. The same single crystals were measured after 25 days ($T_c = 18.25$ K) and 400 days ($T_c = 15.0$ K) of aging at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the superfluid density is well described in both materials by a model using d-wave gap symmetry. The magnitude of the muon spin relaxation rate $\sigma$ in the aged sample, $\sigma\propto 1/\lambda^2\propto\rho_s/m^*$, where $m^*$ is the effective mass, is reduced by about 70% compared to fresh sample. This indicates that the scattering from self-irradiation induced defects is not in the limit of the conventional Abrikosov-Gor'kov pair-breaking theory, but rather in the limit of short coherence length (about 2 nm in PuCoGa$_5$) superconductivity.
  • We present the first muon spin relaxation measurements ever performed on elemental Pu, and set the most stringent upper limits to date on the magnitude of the ordered moment in alpha-Pu and delta-stabilized Pu (alloyed with 4.3 at. % Ga). Assuming a nominal hyperfine coupling field of 1 kOe per Bohr magneton we set an upper limit of 0.001 Bohr magnetons for both materials at T = 4 K.
  • We report muon spin rotation Knight shift and susceptibility studies for 1 T applied field along the crystalline c- and a-axes of the heavy fermion compound Ce2IrIn8. Below a characteristic temperature T* one observes a `Knight-shift anomaly' in which the Knight shift constant K no longer scales linearly with susceptibility chi. This anomaly is consistent with a scaling law in which chi is composed of a high-temperature component corresponding to non-interacting local moments and a low-temperature component chi_cf proportional to (1-T/T*)\ln(T*/T) which characterizes the heavy-electron state below T*. We find that T* is anisotropic, with T_a* = 59(3)K and T_c* = 24(1)K, and derive the magnitudes of chi_cf for H along the a- and c-axes.