• We present adaptive optics-assisted integral field spectroscopy around the Ha or Hb lines of 12 gravitationally lensed galaxies obtained with VLT/SINFONI, Keck/OSIRIS and Gemini/NIFS. We combine these data with previous observations and investigate the dynamics and star formation properties of 17 lensed galaxies at z = 1-4. Thanks to gravitational magnification of 1.4 - 90x by foreground clusters, effective spatial resolutions of 40 - 700 pc are achieved. The magnification also allows us to probe lower star formation rates and stellar masses than unlensed samples; our target galaxies feature dust-corrected SFRs derived from Ha or Hb emission of 0.8 - 40Msol/yr, and stellar masses M* ~ 4e8 - 6e10 Msol. All of the galaxies have velocity gradients, with 59% consistent with being rotating discs and a likely merger fraction of 29%, with the remaining 12% classed as 'undetermined.' We extract 50 star-forming clumps with sizes in the range 60pc - 1kpc from the Ha (or Hb) maps, and find that their surface brightnesses and their characteristic luminosities evolve to higher luminosities with redshift. We show that this evolution can be described by fragmentation on larger scales in gas-rich discs, and is likely to be driven by evolving gas fractions.
  • We investigate the relationships between stellar mass, gas-phase oxygen abundance (metallicity), star formation rate, and dust content of star-forming galaxies at z$\sim$1.6 using Subaru/FMOS spectroscopy in the COSMOS field. The mass-metallicity relation at $z\sim1.6$ is steeper than the relation observed in the local Universe. The steeper MZ relation at $z\sim1.6$ is mainly due to evolution in the stellar mass where the MZ relation begins to turnover and flatten. This turnover mass is 1.2 dex larger at $z\sim1.6$. The most massive galaxies at $z\sim1.6$ ($\sim 10^{11}M_\odot$) are enriched to the level observed in massive galaxies in the local Universe. The mass-metallicity relation we measure at $z\sim1.6$ supports the suggestion of an empirical upper metallicity limit that does not significantly evolve with redshift. We find an anti-correlation between metallicity and star formation rate for galaxies at a fixed stellar mass at $z\sim1.6$ which is similar to trends observed in the local Universe. We do not find a relation between stellar mass, metallicity and star formation rate that is independent of redshift; our data suggest that there is redshift evolution in this relation. We examine the relation between stellar mass, metallicity and dust extinction. We find that at a fixed stellar mass dustier galaxies tend to be more metal rich. From examination of the stellar masses, metallicities, SFRs and dust extinctions we conclude that stellar mass is most closely related to dust extinction.
  • The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is a multiwavelength study of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the local universe. Here we present low resolution Spitzer spectra covering 5-38um and provide a basic analysis of the mid-IR spectral properties for nearby LIRGs. In a companion paper, we discuss detailed fits to the spectra. The GOALS sample of 244 nuclei in 180 luminous and 22 ultraluminous IR galaxies represents a complete subset of the IRAS RBGS and covers a range of merger stages, morphologies and spectral types. The majority (>60%) of GOALS LIRGs have high 6.2um PAH equivalent widths (EQW > 0.4um) and low levels of silicate absorption (s_9.7um >-1.0). There is a general trend among the U/LIRGs for silicate depth and MIR slope to increase with LIR. U/LIRGs in the late stages of a merger also have on average steeper MIR slopes and higher levels of dust obscuration. Together these trends suggest that as gas & dust is funneled towards the center of a coalescing merger, the nuclei become more compact and obscured. The sources that depart from these correlations have very low PAH EQW (EQW < 0.1um) consistent with their MIR emission being dominated by an AGN. The most heavily dust obscured sources are the most compact in their MIR emission, suggesting that the obscuring (cool) dust is associated with the outer regions of the starburst. As the merger progresses a marked decline is seen for the fraction of high EQW (star formation dominated) sources while the fraction of composite sources increases but the fraction of AGN-dominated sources remains low. When compared to the MIR spectra of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z~2, the average GOALS LIRG is more absorbed at 9.7um and has more PAH emission. However, when the AGN contributions to both the local LIRGs and the high-z SMGs are removed, the average local starbursting LIRG closely resembles the starbursting SMGs.
  • In this investigation we quantify the metallicities of low mass galaxies by constructing the most comprehensive census to date. We use galaxies from the SDSS and DEEP2 survey and estimate metallicities from their optical emission lines. We also use two smaller samples from the literature which have metallicities determined by the direct method using the temperature sensitive [OIII]4363 line. We examine the scatter in the local mass-metallicity (MZ) relation determined from ~20,000 star-forming galaxies in the SDSS and show that it is larger at lower stellar masses, consistent with the theoretical scatter in the MZ relation determined from hydrodynamical simulations. We determine a lower limit for the scatter in metallicities of galaxies down to stellar masses of ~10^7 M_solar that is only slightly smaller than the expected scatter inferred from the SDSS MZ relation and significantly larger than what is previously established in the literature. The average metallicity of star-forming galaxies increases with stellar mass. By examining the scatter in the SDSS MZ relation, we show that this is mostly due to the lowest metallicity galaxies. The population of low mass, metal-rich galaxies have properties which are consistent with previously identified galaxies that may be transitional objects between gas-rich dwarf irregulars and gas-poor dwarf spheroidals and ellipticals.
  • We present the mass-metallicity (MZ) and luminosity-metallicity (LZ) relations at z ~ 0.8 from ~1350 galaxies in the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) survey. We determine stellar masses by fitting the spectral energy distribution inferred from photometry with current stellar population synthesis models. This work raises the number of galaxies with metallicities at z ~ 0.8 by more than an order of magnitude. We investigate the evolution in the MZ and LZ relations in comparison with local MZ and LZ relations determined in a consistent manner using ~21,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We show that high stellar mass galaxies (log(M/M_solar)~10.6) at z ~ 0.8 have attained the chemical enrichment seen in the local universe, while lower stellar mass galaxies (log(M/M_solar)~9.2) at z ~ 0.8 have lower metallicities (Delta log(O/H)~0.15 dex) than galaxies at the same stellar mass in the local universe. We find that the LZ relation evolves in both metallicity and B-band luminosity between z ~ 0.8 and z~ 0, with the B-band luminosity evolving as a function of stellar mass. We emphasize that the B-band luminosity should not be used as a proxy for stellar mass in chemical evolution studies of star-forming galaxies. Our study shows that both the metallicity evolution and the B-band luminosity evolution for emission-line galaxies between the epochs are a function of stellar mass, consistent with the cosmic downsizing scenario of galaxy evolution.
  • An analysis of data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite is presented for the z=0.036 merging galaxy system II Zw 096 (CGCG 448-020). Because II Zw 096 has an infrared luminosity of log(L_IR/L_sun) = 11.94, it is classified as a Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG), and was observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). The Spitzer data suggest that 80% of the total infrared luminosity comes from an extremely compact, red source not associated with the nuclei of the merging galaxies. The Spitzer mid-infrared spectra indicate no high-ionization lines from a buried active galactic nucleus in this source. The strong detection of the 3.3 micron and 6.2 micron PAH emission features in the AKARI and Spitzer spectra also implies that the energy source of II Zw 096 is a starburst. Based on Spitzer infrared imaging and AKARI near-infrared spectroscopy, the star formation rate is estimated to be 120 M_sun/yr and > 45 M_sun/yr, respectively. Finally, the high-resolution B, I, and H-band images show many star clusters in the interacting system. The colors of these clusters suggest at least two populations - one with an age of 1-5 Myr and one with an age of 20-500 Myr, reddened by 0-2 magnitudes of visual extinction. The masses of these clusters span a range between 10^6-10^8 M_sun. This starburst source is reminiscent of the extra-nuclear starburst seen in NGC 4038/9 (the Antennae Galaxies) and Arp 299 but approximately an order of magnitude more luminous than the Antennae. The source is remarkable in that the off-nuclear infrared luminosity dominates the enitre system.
  • The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) combines data from NASA's Spitzer, Chandra, Hubble and GALEX observatories, together with ground-based data into a comprehensive imaging and spectroscopic survey of over 200 low redshift Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset of the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The LIRGs targeted in GOALS span the full range of nuclear spectral types defined via traditional optical line-ratio diagrams as well as interaction stages. They provide an unbiased picture of the processes responsible for enhanced infrared emission in galaxies in the local Universe. As an example of the analytic power of the multi-wavelength GOALS dataset, we present data for the interacting system VV 340 (IRAS F14547+2449). Between 80-95% of the total far-infrared emission (or about 5E11 solar luminosities) originates in VV 340 North. While the IRAC colors of VV 340 North and South are consistent with star-forming galaxies, both the Spitzer IRS and Chandra ACIS data indicate the presence of a buried AGN in VV 340 North. The GALEX far and near-UV fluxes imply a extremely large infrared "excess" (IRX) for the system (IR/FUV = 81) which is well above the correlation seen in starburst galaxies. Most of this excess is driven by VV 340 N, which alone has an IR excess of nearly 400. The VV 340 system seems to be comprised of two very different galaxies - an infrared luminous edge-on galaxy (VV 340 North) that dominates the long-wavelength emission from the system and which hosts a buried AGN, and a face-on starburst (VV 340 South) that dominates the short-wavelength emission.
  • Mid-infrared diagnostics are presented for a large portion of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) sample plus archival data from the Infrared Space Observatory and the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our main result is that these mid-infrared diagnostics effectively constrain a target's dominant power source. The combination of a high ionization line index and PAH strength serves as an efficient discriminant between AGN and star-forming nuclei, confirming progress made with ISO spectroscopy on starbursting and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The sensitivity of Spitzer allows us to probe fainter nuclei and star-forming regions within galaxy disks. We find that both star-forming nuclei and extranuclear regions stand apart from nuclei that are powered by Seyfert or LINER activity. In fact, we identify areas within four diagnostic diagrams containing >90% Seyfert/LINER nuclei or >90% HII regions/HII nuclei. We also find that, compared to starbursting nuclei, extranuclear regions typically separate even further from AGN, especially for low-metallicity extranuclear environments. In addition, instead of the traditional mid-infrared approach to differentiating between AGN and star-forming sources that utilizes relatively weak high-ionization lines, we show that strong low-ionization cooling lines of X-ray dominated regions like [SiII] 34.82 micron can alternatively be used as excellent discrimants. Finally, the typical target in this sample shows relatively modest interstellar electron density (~400 cm^{-3}) and obscuration (A_V ~ 1.0 mag for a foreground screen), consistent with a lack of dense clumps of highly obscured gas and dust residing in the emitting regions. [Abridged]
  • (Abridged) We present an initial look at the far infrared-radio correlation within the star-forming disks of four nearby, nearly face-on galaxies (NGC 2403, NGC 3031, NGC 5194, and NGC 6946). Using Spitzer MIPS imaging and WSRT radio continuum data, observed as part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), we are able to probe variations in the logarithmic 24mu/22cm (q_24) and 70mu/22cm (q_70) surface brightness ratios across each disk at sub-kpc scales. We find general trends of decreasing q_24 and q_70 with declining surface brightness and with increasing radius. The residual dispersion around the trend of q_24 and q_70 versus surface brightness is smaller than the residual dispersion around the trend of q_24 and q_70 versus radius, on average by ~0.1 dex, indicating that the distribution of star formation sites is more important in determining the infrared/radio disk appearance than the exponential profiles of disks. We have also performed preliminary phenomenological modeling of cosmic ray electron (CRe^-) diffusion using an image-smearing technique, and find that smoothing the infrared maps improves their correlation with the radio maps. Exponential kernels tend to work better than Gaussian kernels which suggests that additional processes besides simple random-walk diffusion in three dimensions must affect the evolution of CRe^-s. The best fit smoothing kernels for the two less active star-forming galaxies (NGC 2403 and NGC 3031) have much larger scale-lengths than those of the more active star-forming galaxies (NGC 5194 and NGC 6946). This difference may be due to the relative deficit of recent CRe^- injection into the interstellar medium (ISM) for the galaxies having largely quiescent disks.
  • The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) is carrying out a comprehensive multi-wavelength survey on a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. The 1-850um spectral energy distributions are presented using broadband imaging data from Spitzer, 2MASS, ISO, IRAS, and SCUBA. The infrared colors derived from the globally-integrated Spitzer data are generally consistent with the previous generation of models that were developed based on global data for normal star-forming galaxies, though significant deviations are observed. Spitzer's excellent sensitivity and resolution also allow a detailed investigation of the infrared spectral energy distributions for various locations within the three large, nearby galaxies NGC3031 (M81), NGC5194 (M51), and NGC7331. Strong correlations exist between the local star formation rate and the infrared colors f_nu(70um)/f_nu(160um) and f_nu(24um)/f_nu(160um), suggesting that the 24 and 70um emission are useful tracers of the local star formation activity level. Preliminary evidence indicates that variations in the 24um emission, and not variations in the emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 8um, drive the variations in the f_nu(8.0um)/f_nu(24um) colors within NGC3031, NGC5194, and NGC7331. If the galaxy-to-galaxy variations in spectral energy distributions seen in our sample are representative of the range present at high redshift then extrapolations of total infrared luminosities and star formation rates from the observed 24um flux will be uncertain at the factor-of-five level (total range). The corresponding uncertainties using the redshifted 8.0um flux (e.g. observed 24um flux for a z=2 source) are factors of 10-20. Considerable caution should be used when interpreting such extrapolated infrared luminosities.