• We use ultradeep SCUBA-2 850um observations (~0.37 mJy rms) of the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N) and 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) X-ray fields to examine the amount of dusty star formation taking place in the host galaxies of high-redshift X-ray AGNs. Supplementing with COSMOS, we measure the submillimeter fluxes of the 4-8 keV sources at z>1, finding little flux at the highest X-ray luminosities but significant flux at intermediate luminosities. We determine gray body and MIR luminosities by fitting spectral energy distributions to each X-ray source and to each radio source in an ultradeep Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) 1.4 GHz (11.5uJy at 5-sigma) image of the CDF-N. We confirm the FIR-radio and MIR-radio correlations to z=4 using the non-X-ray detected radio sources. Both correlations are also obeyed by the X-ray less luminous AGNs but not by the X-ray quasars. We interpret the low FIR luminosities relative to the MIR for the X-ray quasars as being due to a lack of star formation, while the MIR stays high due to the AGN contribution. We find that the FIR luminosity distributions are highly skewed and the means are dominated by a small number of high-luminosity galaxies. Thus, stacking or averaging analyses will overestimate the level of star formation taking place in the bulk of the X-ray sample. We conclude that most of the host galaxies of X-ray quasars are not strong star formers, perhaps because their star formation is suppressed by AGN feedback.
  • We use the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope's SCUBA-2 camera to image a 400 arcmin^2 area surrounding the GOODS-N field. The 850 micron rms noise ranges from a value of 0.49 mJy in the central region to 3.5 mJy at the outside edge. From these data, we construct an 850 micron source catalog to 2 mJy containing 49 sources detected above the 4-sigma level. We use an ultradeep (11.5 uJy at 5-sigma) 1.4 GHz image obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array together with observations made with the Submillimeter Array to identify counterparts to the submillimeter galaxies. For most cases of multiple radio counterparts, we can identify the correct counterpart from new and existing Submillimeter Array data. We have spectroscopic redshifts for 62% of the radio sources in the 9 arcmin radius highest sensitivity region (556/894) and 67% of the radio sources in the GOODS-N region (367/543). We supplement these with a modest number of additional photometric redshifts in the GOODS-N region (30). We measure millimetric redshifts from the radio to submillimeter flux ratios for the unidentified submillimeter sample, assuming an Arp 220 spectral energy distribution. We find a radio flux dependent K-z relation for the radio sources, which we use to estimate redshifts for the remaining radio sources. We determine the star formation rates (SFRs) of the submillimeter sources based on their radio powers and their submillimeter and find that they agree well. The radio data are deep enough to detect star-forming galaxies with SFRs >2000 solar masses per year to z~6. We find galaxies with SFRs up to ~6,000 solar masses per year over the redshift range z=1.5-6, but we see evidence for a turn-down in the SFR distribution function above 2000 solar masses per year.
  • The redshift distribution of the short-duration GRBs is a crucial, but currently fragmentary, clue to the nature of their progenitors. Here we present optical observations of nine short GRBs obtained with Gemini, Magellan, and the Hubble Space Telescope. We detect the afterglows and host galaxies of two short bursts, and host galaxies for two additional bursts with known optical afterglow positions, and five with X-ray positions (<6'' radius). In eight of the nine cases we find that the most probable host galaxies are faint, R~23-26.5 mag, and are therefore starkly different from the first few short GRB hosts with R~17-22 mag and z<0.5. Indeed, we measure spectroscopic redshifts of z~0.4-1.1 for the four brightest hosts. A comparison to large field galaxy samples, as well as the hosts of long GRBs and previous short GRBs, indicates that the fainter hosts likely reside at z>1. Our most conservative limit is that at least half of the five hosts without a known redshift reside at z>0.7 (97% confidence level), suggesting that about 1/3-2/3 of all short GRBs originate at higher redshifts than previously determined. This has two important implications: (i) We constrain the acceptable age distributions to a wide lognormal (sigma>1) with tau~4-8 Gyr, or to a power law, P(tau)~tau^n, with -1<n<0; and (ii) the inferred isotropic energies, E_{gamma,iso}~10^50-10^52 erg, are significantly larger than ~10^48-10^49 erg for the low redshift short GRBs, indicating a large spread in energy release or jet opening angles. Finally, we re-iterate the importance of short GRBs as potential gravitational wave sources and find a conservative Advanced LIGO detection rate of ~2-6 yr^-1.
  • We use new deep near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) observations to analyze the 850$~\mu$m image of the GOODS HDF-N region. We show that much of the submillimeter background at this wavelength is picked out by sources with $H(AB)$ or 3.6um (AB)<23.25 (1.8 uJy). These sources contribute an 850um background of 24\pm2 Jy deg^-2. This is a much higher fraction of the measured background (31-45 Jy deg^-2) than is found with current 20cm or 24um samples. Roughly one-half of these NIR-selected sources have spectroscopic identifications, and we can assign robust photometric redshifts to nearly all of the remaining sources using their UV to MIR spectral energy distributions. We use the redshift and spectral type information to show that a large fraction of the 850um background light comes from sources with z=0-1.5 and that the sources responsible have intermediate spectral types. Neither the elliptical galaxies, which have no star formation, nor the bluest galaxies, which have little dust, contribute a significant amount of 850um light, despite the fact that together they comprise approximately half of the galaxies in the sample. The galaxies with intermediate spectral types have a mean flux of 0.40\pm0.03 mJy at 850um and 9.1\pm0.3 uJy at 20cm. The redshift distribution of the NIR-selected 850um light lies well below that of the much smaller amount of light traced by the more luminous, radio- selected submillimeter sources. We therefore require a revised star-formation history with a lower star-formation rate at high redshifts. We use a stacking analysis of the 20cm light in the NIR sample to show that the star-formation history of the total 850um sample is relatively flat down to z~1 and that half of the total star formation occurs at redshifts z<1.4.
  • We report near simultaneous multi-color (RIYJHK) observations made with the MAGNUM 2m telescope of the gamma ray burst GRB 050904 detected by the SWIFT satellite. The spectral energy distribution shows a very large break between the I and J bands. Using intergalactic transmissions measured from high redshift quasars we show that the observations place a 95% confidence lower limit of z=6.18 on the object, consistent with a later measured spectroscopic redshift of 6.29 obtained by Kawai et al. (2005) with the Subaru telescope. We show that the break strength in the R and I bands is consistent with that measured in the quasars. Finally we consider the implications for the star formation history at high redshift.
  • Despite a rich phenomenology, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are divided into two classes based on their duration and spectral hardness -- the long-soft and the short-hard bursts. The discovery of afterglow emission from long GRBs was a watershed event, pinpointing their origin to star forming galaxies, and hence the death of massive stars, and indicating an energy release of about 10^51 erg. While theoretical arguments suggest that short GRBs are produced in the coalescence of binary compact objects (neutron stars or black holes), the progenitors, energetics, and environments of these events remain elusive despite recent localizations. Here we report the discovery of the first radio afterglow from a short burst, GRB 050724, which unambiguously associates it with an elliptical galaxy at a redshift, z=0.257. We show that the burst is powered by the same relativistic fireball mechanism as long GRBs, with the ejecta possibly collimated in jets, but that the total energy release is 10-1000 times smaller. More importantly, the nature of the host galaxy demonstrates that short GRBs arise from an old (>1 Gyr) stellar population, strengthening earlier suggestions, and providing support for coalescing compact object binaries as the progenitors.
  • We use the combination of the 2 Ms Chandra X-ray image, new J and H band images, and the Spitzer IRAC and MIPS images of the Chandra Deep Field-North to obtain high spectroscopic and photometric redshift completeness of high and intermediate X-ray luminosity sources in the redshift interval z=2-3. We measure the number densities of z=2-3 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and broad-line AGNs in the rest-frame 2-8 keV luminosity intervals 10^44-10^45 and 10^43-10^44 ergs/s and compare with previous lower redshift results. We confirm a decline in the number densities of intermediate-luminosity sources at z>1. We also measure the number density of z=2-3 AGNs in the luminosity interval 10^43-10^44.5 ergs/s and compare with previous low and high-redshift results. Again, we find a decline in the number densities at z>1. In both cases, we can rule out the hypothesis that the number densities remain flat to z=2-3 at above the 5-sigma level.
  • By exploiting the far-infrared(FIR) and radio correlation, we have performed the Likelihood-Ratio analysis to identify optical counterparts to the far-infrared sources in the Lockman Hole. Using the likelihood ratio analysis and the associated reliability, 44 FIR sources have been identified with radio sources. Redshifts have been obtained for 29 out of 44 identified sources. One hyper-luminous infrared galaxy (HyLIRG) with and four ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) are identified in our sample. The space density of the FIR sources at z = 0.3-0.6 is 4.6\times 10^{-5}Mpc^{-3}, implying a rapid evolution of the ULIRG population. Most of \ISO FIR sources have their FIR-radio ratios similar to star-forming galaxies ARP 220 and M82. At least seven of our FIR sources show evidence for the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) in optical emission lines, radio continuum excess, or X-ray activity. Three out of five (60%) of the ULIRG/HyLIRGs are AGN galaxies. Five of the seven AGN galaxies are within the ROSAT X-ray survey field, and two are within the XMM-Newton survey fields. X-ray emission has been detected in only one source, 1EX030, which is optically classified as a quasar. The non-detection in the XMM-Newton 2-10 keV band suggests a very thick absorption obscuring the central source of the two AGN galaxies. Several sources have an extreme FIR luminosity relative to the optical R-band, L(90\mu\mathrm{m})/L(R) > 500, which is rare even among the local ULIRG population. While source confusion or blending might offer an explanation in some cases, they may represent a new population of galaxies with an extreme activity of star formation in an undeveloped stellar system -- i.e., formation of bulges or young ellipticals.
  • We use highly spectroscopically complete deep and wide-area Chandra surveys to determine the cosmic evolution of hard X-ray-selected AGNs. We determine hard X-ray luminosity functions (HXLFs) for all spectral types and for broad-line AGNs (BLAGNs) alone. At z<1.2, both are well described by pure luminosity evolution. Thus, all AGNs drop in luminosity by almost an order of magnitude over this redshift range. We show that this observed drop is due to AGN downsizing. We directly compare our BLAGN HXLFs with the optical QSO LFs and find that the optical QSO LFs do not probe faint enough to see the downturn in the BLAGN HXLFs. We rule out galaxy dilution as a partial explanation for the observation that BLAGNs dominate the number densities at the higher X-ray luminosities, while optically-narrow AGNs (FWHM<2000 km/s) dominate at the lower X-ray luminosities by measuring the nuclear UV/optical properties of the Chandra sources using the HST ACS GOODS-North data. The UV/optical nuclei of the optically-narrow AGNs are much weaker than expected if they were similar to the BLAGNs. We therefore postulate the need for a luminosity dependent unified model. Alternatively, the BLAGNs and the optically-narrow AGNs could be intrinsically different source populations. We cover both interpretations by constructing composite spectral energy distributions--including long-wavelength data from the MIR to the submillimeter--by spectral type and by X-ray luminosity. We use these to infer the bolometric corrections (from hard X-ray luminosities to bolometric luminosities) needed to map the accretion history. We determine the accreted supermassive black hole mass density for all spectral types and for BLAGNs alone using the observed evolution of the hard X-ray energy density production rate and our inferred bolometric corrections.
  • We use redshift observations of two deep 1.4GHz fields to probe the evolution of the bright end of the radio galaxy luminosity function to z=1.5. We show that the number of galaxies with radio power that would correspond locally to an ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIG) evolves rapidly over this redshift range. The optical spectra and X-ray luminosities are used to refine this result by separating the sources with clear active galactic nucleus (AGN) signatures from those that may be dominated by star formation. Both populations show extremely rapid evolution over this redshift range. We find that the number of sources with ULIG radio power and no clear AGN signatures evolves as (1+z)^(7).
  • We report the results of an extensive spectroscopic survey of galaxies in the roughly 160 square arcminute ACS-GOODS region surrounding the HDF-N. We have identified 787 galaxies or stars with z'<24, R<24.5, or B<25 lying in the region. The spectra were obtained with either the DEIMOS or LRIS spectrographs on the Keck 10m telescopes. The results are compared with photometric redshift estimates and with redshifts from the literature, as well as with the redshifts of a parallel effort led by a group at Keck. Our sample, when combined with the literature data, provides identifications for 1180 sources. We use our results to determine the redshift distributions with magnitude, to analyze the rest-frame color distributions with redshift and spectral type, and to investigate the dependence of the X-ray galaxy properties on the local galaxy density in the redshift interval z=0-1.5. We find the rather surprising result that the galaxy X-ray properties are not strongly dependent on the local galaxy density for galaxies in the same luminosity range.
  • We have conducted a deep multi-color imaging survey of 0.2 degrees^2 centered on the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N). We shall refer to this region as the Hawaii-HDF-N. Deep data were collected in U, B, V, R, I, and z' bands over the central 0.2 degrees^2 and in HK' over a smaller region covering the Chandra Deep Field North (CDF-N). The data were reduced to have accurate relative photometry and astrometry across the entire field to facilitate photometric redshifts and spectroscopic followup. We have compiled a catalog of 48,858 objects in the central 0.2 degrees^2 detected at 5 sigma significance in a 3" aperture in either R or z' band. Number counts and color-magnitude diagrams are presented and shown to be consistent with previous observations. Using color selection we have measured the density of objects at 3<z<7. Our multi-color data indicates that samples selected at z>5.5 using the Lyman break technique suffer from more contamination by low redshift objects than suggested by previous studies.
  • We investigate how the fraction of broad-line sources in the AGN population changes with X-ray luminosity and redshift. We first construct the rest-frame hard-energy (2-8 keV) X-ray luminosity function (HXLF) at z=0.1-1 using Chandra Lockman Hole-Northwest wide-area data, Chandra Deep Field-North 2 Ms data, other Chandra deep field data, and the ASCA Large Sky Survey data. We find that broad-line AGNs dominate above 3e43 ergs/s and have a mean luminosity of 1.3e44 ergs/s. Type II AGNs can only become an important component of the X-ray population at Seyfert-like X-ray luminosities. We then construct z=0.1-0.5 and z=0.5-1 HXLFs and compare them with both the local HXLF measured from HEAO-1 A2 survey data and the z=1.5-3 HXLF measured from soft-energy (0.5-2 keV) Chandra and ROSAT data. We find that the number density of >1e44 ergs/s sources (quasars) steadily declines with decreasing redshift, while the number density of 1e43-1e44 ergs/s sources peaks at z=0.5-1. Strikingly, however, the number density of broad-line AGNs remains roughly constant with redshift while their average luminosities decline at the lower redshifts, showing another example of cosmic downsizing.
  • We present an optical and NIR catalog for the X-ray sources in the 2 Ms Chandra observation of the Hubble Deep Field-North region. We have high-quality multicolor images of all 503 X-ray point sources and reliable spectroscopic redshifts for 284. We spectroscopically identify six z>1 type II quasars. Our spectroscopic completeness for the R<24 sources is 87%. The spectroscopic redshift distribution shows two broad redshift spikes that have clearly grown over those originally seen in the 1 Ms exposure. The spectroscopically identified extragalactic sources already comprise 75% of the measured 2-8 keV light. Redshift slices versus 2-8 keV flux show that an impressive 54% of the measured 2-8 keV light arises from sources at z<1 and 68% from sources at z<2. We use seven broadband colors and a Bayesian photometric redshift estimation code to obtain photometric redshifts. The photometric redshifts are within 25% of the spectroscopic redshifts for 94% of the non-broad-line sources with both photometric and spectroscopic measurements. We use our wide wavelength coverage to determine rest-frame colors for the X-ray sources with spectroscopic or photometric redshifts. Many of the X-ray sources have the rest-frame colors of evolved red galaxies and there is very little evolution in these colors with redshift. We also determine absolute magnitudes and find that many of the non-broad-line sources are more luminous than Mstar, even at high redshifts. We therefore infer that deep X-ray observations may provide an effective way of locating Mstar galaxies with colors similar to present-day early-type galaxies to high redshifts. (Abridged)
  • We present catalogs for the ~2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North, currently the deepest X-ray observation of the Universe in the 0.5-8.0 keV band. Five hundred and three (503) X-ray sources are detected over an ~448 sq.arcmin area in up to seven bands; 20 of these X-ray sources lie in the Hubble Deep Field-North. Source positions are determined using matched-filter and centroiding techniques; the median positional uncertainty is ~0.3 arcsecs. The X-ray colors of the detected sources indicate a broad variety of source types, although absorbed AGNs (including some possible Compton-thick sources) are clearly the dominant type. We also match lower significance X-ray sources to optical counterparts and provide a list of 79 optically bright R<~23) lower significance Chandra sources. The majority of these sources appear to be starburst and normal galaxies. We investigate the source-free background, determine the maximum photon-limited exposures, and investigate source confusion. These analyses directly show that Chandra can achieve significantly higher sensitivities in an efficient nearly photon-limited manner and be largely free of source confusion. To allow consistent comparisons, we have also produced point-source catalogs for the ~1 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S). Three hundred and twenty-six (326) X-ray sources are included in the main Chandra catalog, and an additional 42 optically bright X-ray sources are included in a lower significance Chandra catalog. We find good agreement with the photometry of the previously published CDF-S catalogs; however, we provide significantly improved positional accuracy (ABRIDGED).
  • The high angular resolution and sensitivity of the Chandra X-ray Observatory has yielded large numbers of faint X-ray sources with measured redshifts in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-8 keV) energy bands. Many of these sources show few obvious optical signatures of active galactic nuclei (AGN). We use Chandra observations of the Hubble Deep Field North region, A370, and the Hawaii Survey Fields SSA13 and SSA22, together with the ROSAT Ultra Deep Survey soft sample and the ASCA Large Sky Survey hard sample, to construct rest-frame 2-8 keV luminosity functions versus redshift for all the X-ray sources, regardless of their optical AGN characteristics. At z=0.1-1 most of the 2-8 keV light density arises in sources with luminosities in the 10^42 erg/s to 10^44 erg/s range. We show that the number density of sources in this luminosity range is rising, or is at least constant, with decreasing redshift. Broad-line AGN are the dominant population at higher luminosities, and these sources show the well-known rapid positive evolution with increasing redshift to z~3. We argue that the dominant supermassive black hole formation has occurred at recent times in objects with low accretion mass flow rates rather than at earlier times in more X-ray luminous objects with high accretion mass flow rates.
  • Deep Chandra X-ray exposures provide an efficient route for locating optically faint active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts. We use deep multicolor optical data to search for z>5 AGN in the 2 Ms X-ray exposure of the Chandra Deep Field-North. Of the 423 X-ray sources bright enough (z'<25.2) for a color-color analysis, at most one lies at z=5-6 and none at z>6. The z>5 object is spectroscopically confirmed at z=5.19. Only 31 of the 77 sources with z'>25.2 are undetected in the B or V bands at the 2-sigma level and could lie at z>5. There are too few moderate luminosity AGN at z=5-6.5 to ionize the intergalactic medium.
  • (abridged) We present multiwavelength observations for a large sample of microjansky radio sources detected in ultradeep 1.4GHz maps centered on the Hubble Deep Field-North (HDF-N) and the Hawaii Survey Fields SSA13 and SSA22. Our spectroscopic redshifts for 169 radio sources reveal a flat median redshift distribution, and these sources are hosted by similarly luminous optical L* galaxies, regardless of redshift. This is a serious concern for radio estimates of the local star formation rate density, as a substantial fraction of the ultraviolet luminosity density is generated by sub-L* galaxies at low redshifts. From our submillimeter measurements for 278 radio sources, we find error-weighted mean 850micron fluxes of 1.72$\pm$0.09 mJy for the total sample, 2.37$\pm$0.13 mJy for the optically-faint (I>23.5) subsample, and 1.04$\pm$0.13 mJy for the optically-bright (I<23.5) subsample. We significantly (>3\sigma) detect in the submillimeter 50 of the radio sources, 38 with I>23.5. Spectroscopic redshifts for three of the I<23.5 submillimeter-detected radio sources are in the range z=1.0-3.4, and all show AGN signatures. Using only the submillimeter mapped regions we find that 69\pm9% of the submillimeter-detected radio population are at I>23.5. We also find that 66\pm7% of the S850>5 mJy (>4\sigma) sources are radio-identified. We find that millimetric redshift estimates at low redshifts are best made with a FIR template intermediate between a Milky Way type galaxy and a starburst galaxy, and at high redshifts with an Arp220 template.
  • We present the optical, near-infrared, submillimeter, and radio follow-up catalog of the X-ray selected sources from the 1 Ms Chandra observation of the Hubble Deep Field North region. We have B, V, R, I, and z' magnitudes for the 370 X-ray point sources, HK' magnitudes for 276, and spectroscopic redshifts for 182. We present high-quality spectra for 175 of these. The redshift distribution shows indications of structures at z=0.843 and z=1.0175 (also detected in optical surveys) which could account for a part of the field-to-field variation seen in the X-ray number counts. The flux contributions separated into unit bins of redshift show that the z<1 spectroscopically identified sources already contribute about one-third of the total flux in both the hard and soft bands. We find from ratios of the X-ray counts that the X-ray spectra are well-described by absorption of an intrinsic Gamma=1.8 power-law, with log NH values ranging from 21 to 23.7. We estimate that the Chandra sources that produce 87% of the HEAO-A X-ray background (XRB) at 3 keV produce 57% at 20 keV, provided that at high energies the spectral shape of the sources continues to be well-described by a Gamma=1.8 power-law. However, when the Chandra contributions are renormalized to the BeppoSAX XRB at 3 keV, the shape matches fairly well the observed XRB at both energies. Thus, whether a substantial population of as-yet undetected Compton-thick sources is required to completely resolve the XRB above 10 keV depends critically on how the currently discrepant XRB measurements in the 1-10 keV energy range tie together with the higher energy XRB. (Abridged)
  • We present deep 850 micron maps of three massive lensing clusters, A370, A851, and A2390, with well-constrained mass models. Our cluster exposure times are more than 2 to 5 times longer than any other published cluster field observations. We catalog the sources and determine the submillimeter number counts. The counts are best determined in the 0.3 to 2 mJy range where the areas are large enough to provide a significant sample. At 0.3 mJy the cumulative counts are 3.3 (1.3,6.3) 10^4 per square degree, where the upper and lower bounds in the brackets are the 90% confidence range. The surface density at these faint count limits enters the realm of significant overlap with other galaxy populations.The corresponding percentage of the extragalactic background light (EBL) residing in this flux range is about 45-65%, depending on the EBL measurement used. Given that 20-30% of the EBL is resolved at flux densities between 2 and 10 mJy, most of the submillimeter EBL is arising in sources above 0.3 mJy. We also performed a noise analysis to obtain an independent estimate of the counts. The upper bounds on the counts determined from the noise analysis closely match the upper limits obtained from the direct counts. The differential counts from this and other surveys can reasonably be described by the parameterization n(S)=3 10^4/(0.7 + S^3) per square degree per mJy with S in mJy, which also integrates to match the EBL.
  • An extremely deep X-ray survey (about 1 Ms) of the Hubble Deep Field North and its environs (about 450 arcmin^2) has been performed with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This is one of the two deepest X-ray surveys ever performed; for point sources near the aim point it reaches 0.5-2.0 keV and 2-8 keV flux limits of 3 x 10^{-17} erg/cm^2/s and 2 x 10^{-16} erg/cm^2/s, respectively. Here we provide source catalogs along with details of the observations, data reduction, and technical analysis. Observing conditions, such as background, were excellent for almost all of the exposure. We have detected 370 distinct point sources: 360 in the 0.5-8.0 keV band, 325 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band, 265 in the 2-8 keV band, and 145 in the 4-8 keV band. Two new Chandra sources in the HDF-N itself are reported and discussed. Source positions are accurate to within 0.6-1.7 arcsec (at 90% confidence) depending mainly on the off-axis angle. We also detect two highly significant extended X-ray sources and several other likely extended X-ray sources. We present basic number count results for sources located near the center of the field. Source densities of 7100^{+1100}_{-940} deg^{-2} (at 4.2 x 10^{-17} erg/cm^2/s) and 4200^{+670}_{-580} deg^{-2} (at 3.8 x 10^{-16} erg/cm^2/s) are observed in the soft and hard bands, respectively.
  • We present submillimeter observations for 136 of the 370 X-ray sources detected in the 1 Ms exposure of the Chandra Deep Field North. Ten of the X-ray sources are significantly detected in the submillimeter. The average X-ray source in the sample has a significant 850 micron flux of 1.69+/-0.27 mJy. This value shows little dependence on the 2-8 keV flux from 5e-16 erg/cm^2/s to 1e-14 erg/cm^2/s. The ensemble of X-ray sources contribute about 10% of the extragalactic background light at 850 microns. The submillimeter excess is found to be strongest in the optically faint X-ray sources that are also seen at 20 cm, which is consistent with these X-ray sources being obscured and at high redshift (z>1).
  • With recent Chandra observations, at least 60% of the 2-10 keV background is now resolved into discrete sources. Here we present deep optical, NIR, submm, and 20 cm (radio) images, as well as high-quality optical spectra, of a complete sample of 20 hard X-ray sources in a deep Chandra observation of the SSA13 field. The thirteen I<23.5 galaxies have redshifts in the range 0.1 to 2.6. Two are quasars, five show AGN signatures, and six are z<1.5 luminous bulge-dominated galaxies whose spectra show no obvious optical AGN signatures. The seven spectroscopically unidentified sources have colors that are consistent with evolved early galaxies at z=1.5-3. Only one hard X-ray source is significantly detected in an ultradeep submm map; its millimetric redshift is in the range z=1.2-2.4. None of the remaining 19 sources is detected in the submm. These results probably reflect the fact that the 850-micron flux limits obtainable with SCUBA are quite close to the expected fluxes from obscured AGN. The hard X-ray sources have an average L(FIR)/L(2-10 keV)~60, similar to that of local obscured AGN. The same ratio for a sample of submm selected sources is in excess of 1100, suggesting that their FIR light is primarily produced by star formation. Our data show that luminous hard X-ray sources are common in bulge-dominated optically luminous galaxies. We use our measured bolometric corrections with the 2-10 keV EBL to infer the growth of supermassive black holes. Even with a high radiative efficiency of accretion (e=0.1), the black hole mass density required to account for the observed light is comparable to the local black hole mass density. (Abridged)
  • Direct submm imaging has recently revealed the 850-micron background to be mostly composed of a population of distant ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but identifying the optical/NIR counterparts to these sources has proved difficult due to the poor submm spatial resolution. However, the proportionality of both cm and submm data to the star formation rate suggests that high resolution radio continuum maps with subarcsecond positional accuracy can be exploited to locate submm sources. In this paper we present results from a targeted SCUBA survey of micro-Jansky radio sources in the flanking fields of the Hubble Deep Field. Even with relatively shallow 850-micron SCUBA observations (>6 mJy at 3-sigma), we were successful at making submm detections of optical/NIR-faint (I>24 and K~21-22) radio sources, and our counts closely match the bright counts from submm surveys. Redshift estimates can be made from the ratio of the submm flux to the radio flux across the 100 GHz break in the spectral energy distribution. This millimetric redshift estimation places the bright submm population at z=1-3 where it forms the high redshift tail of the faint radio population. The star formation rate density (SFRD) due to ultraluminous infrared galaxies increases by more than two orders of magnitude from z~0 to z~1-3. The SFRD at high redshift inferred from our >6 mJy submm observations is comparable to that observed in the UV/optical. (Abridged)
  • We use deep ground-based imaging in the near-IR to search for counterparts to the luminous submm sources in the catalog of Smail et al (1998). For the majority of the submm sources the near-IR imaging supports the counterparts originally selected from deep optical images. However, in two cases (10% of the sample) we find a relatively bright near-IR source close to the submm position, sources that were unidentified in the deep HST and ground-based R-band images used in Smail et al (1998). We place limits on colours of these sources from deep high-resolution Keck II imaging and find they have 2-sigma limits of (I-K)>6.8 and (I-K)>6.0 respectively. Both sources thus class as EROs. Using the spectral properties of the submm source in the radio and submm we argue that these EROs are probably the source of the submm emission, rather than the bright spiral galaxies previously identified by Smail et al. (1998). From the surface density of these submm-bright EROs we suggest that this class accounts for the majority of the reddest members of the ERO population, in good agreement with the preliminary conclusions of pointed submm observations of individual EROs. We conclude that the most extreme EROs represent a population of dusty, ultraluminous galaxies at high redshifts; further study of these will provide insights into the nature of star formation in obscured galaxies in the early Universe. The identification of similar counterparts in blank field submm surveys will be extremely difficult owing to their faintness (K~20.5, I>26.5). Finally, we discuss the radio and submm properties of the two submm-bright EROs discovered here and suggest that both galaxies lie at z>2.