• In this paper we present visible range light curves of the irregular Uranian satellites Sycorax, Caliban, Prospero, Ferdinand and Setebos taken with Kepler Space Telescope in the course of the K2 mission. Thermal emission measurements obtained with the Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS instruments of Sycorax and Caliban were also analysed and used to determine size, albedo and surface characteristics of these bodies. We compare these properties with the rotational and surface characteristics of irregular satellites in other giant planet systems and also with those of main belt and Trojan asteroids and trans-Neptunian objects. Our results indicate that the Uranian irregular satellite system likely went through a more intense collisional evolution than the irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Surface characteristics of Uranian irregular satellites seems to resemble the Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects more than irregular satellites around other giant planets, suggesting the existence of a compositional discontinuity in the young Solar system inside the orbit of Uranus.
  • The RV Tauri stars constitute a small group of classical pulsating stars with some dozen known members in the Milky Way. The light variation is caused predominantly by pulsations, but these alone do not explain the full complexity of the light curves. High quality photometry of RV Tau-type stars is very rare. DF Cygni is the only member of this class of stars in the original Kepler field, hence allowing the most accurate photometric investigation of an RV Tauri star to date. The main goal is to analyse the periodicities of the RV Tauri-type star DF Cygni by combining four years of high-quality Kepler photometry with almost half a century of visual data collected by the American Association of Variable Star Observers. Kepler quarters of data have been stitched together to minimize the systematic effects of the space data. The mean levels have been matched with the AAVSO visual data. Both datasets have been submitted to Fourier and wavelet analyses, while the stability of the main pulsations has been studied with the O-C method and the analysis of the time-dependent amplitudes. DF Cygni shows a very rich behaviour on all time-scales. The slow variation has a period of 779.606 d and it has been remarkably coherent during the whole time-span of the combined data. On top of the long-term cycles the pulsations appear with a period of 24.925 d. Both types of light variation significantly fluctuate in time, with a constantly changing interplay of amplitude and phase modulations. The long-period change (i.e. the RVb signature) somewhat resembles the Long Secondary Period (LSP) phenomenon of the pulsating red giants, whereas the short-period pulsations are very similar to those of the Cepheid variables. Comparing the pulsation patterns with the latest models of Type-II Cepheids, we found evidence of strong non-linear effects directly observable in the Kepler light curve.
  • Remote investigations of the ancient solar system matter has been traditionally carried out through the observations of long-period (LP) comets that are less affected by solar irradiation than the short-period counterparts orbiting much closer to the Sun. Here we summarize the results of our decade-long survey of the distant activity of LP comets. We found that the most important separation in the dataset is based on the dynamical nature of the objects. Dynamically new comets are characterized by a higher level of activity on average: the most active new comets in our sample can be characterized by afrho values >3--4 higher than that of our most active returning comets. New comets develop more symmetric comae, suggesting a generally isotropic outflow. Contrary to this, the coma of recurrent comets can be less symmetrical, ocassionally exhibiting negative slope parameters, suggesting sudden variations in matter production. The morphological appearance of the observed comets is rather diverse. A surprisingly large fraction of the comets have long, teniouos tails, but the presence of impressive tails does not show a clear correlation with the brightness of the comets.
  • Many attempts have already been made for detecting exomoons around transiting exoplanets but the first confirmed discovery is still pending. The experience that have been gathered so far allow us to better optimize future space telescopes for this challenge, already during the development phase. In this paper we focus on the forthcoming CHaraterising ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS),describing an optimized decision algorithm with step-by-step evaluation, and calculating the number of required transits for an exomoon detection for various planet-moon configurations that can be observable by CHEOPS. We explore the most efficient way for such an observation which minimizes the cost in observing time. Our study is based on PTV observations (photocentric transit timing variation, Szab\'o et al. 2006) in simulated CHEOPS data, but the recipe does not depend on the actual detection method, and it can be substituted with e.g. the photodynamical method for later applications. Using the current state-of-the-art level simulation of CHEOPS data we analyzed transit observation sets for different star-planet-moon configurations and performed a bootstrap analysis to determine their detection statistics. We have found that the detection limit is around an Earth-sized moon. In the case of favorable spatial configurations, systems with at least such a large moon and with at least Neptune-sized planet, 80\% detection chance requires at least 5-6 transit observations on average. There is also non-zero chance in the case of smaller moons, but the detection statistics deteriorates rapidly, while the necessary transit measurements increase fast. (abridged)
  • Two red supergiants of the Per OB1 association, RS Per and T Per, have been observed in H band using the MIRC instrument at the CHARA array. The data show clear evidence of departure from circular symmetry. We present here new techniques specially developed to analyze such cases, based on state-of-the-art statistical frameworks. The stellar surfaces are first modeled as limb-darkened discs based on SATLAS models that fit both MIRC interferometric data and publicly available spectrophotometric data. Bayesian model selection is then used to determine the most probable number of spots. The effective surface temperatures are also determined and give further support to the recently derived hotter temperature scales of red su- pergiants. The stellar surfaces are reconstructed by our model-independent imaging code SQUEEZE, making use of its novel regularizer based on Compressed Sensing theory. We find excellent agreement between the model-selection results and the reconstructions. Our results provide evidence for the presence of near-infrared spots representing about 3-5% of the stellar flux.
  • Doppler observations of exoplanet systems have been a very expensive technique, mainly due to the high costs of high-resolution stable spectrographs. Recent advances in instrumentation enable affordable Doppler planet detections with surprisingly small optical telescopes. We investigate the possibility of measuring Doppler reflex motion of planet hosting stars with small-aperture telescopes that have traditionally been neglected for this kind of studies. After thoroughly testing the recently developed and commercially available Shelyak eShel echelle spectrograph, we demonstrated that it is routinely possible to achieve velocity precision at the $100 \mathrm{m\,s}^{-1}$ level, reaching down to $\pm 50~\mathrm{m\,s}^{-1}$ for the best cases. We describe our off-the-shelf instrumentation, including a new 0.5m RC telescope at the Gothard Astrophysical Observatory of Lor\'and E\"otv\"os University equipped with an intermediate resolution fiber-fed echelle spectrograph. We present some follow-up radial velocity measurements of planet hosting stars and point out that updating the orbital solution of Doppler-planets is a very important task that can be fulfilled with sub-meter sized optical telescopes without requesting very expensive telescope times on 2--4~m (or larger) class telescopes.
  • 2012 DR30 is a recently discovered Solar System object on a unique orbit, with a high eccentricity of 0.9867, a perihelion distance of 14.54 AU and a semi-major axis of 1109 AU, in this respect outscoring the vast majority of trans-Neptunian objects. We performed Herschel/PACS and optical photometry to uncover the size and albedo of 2012 DR30, together with its thermal and surface properties. The body is 185 km in diameter and has a relatively low V-band geometric albedo of ~8%. Although the colours of the object indicate that 2012 DR30 is an RI taxonomy class TNO or Centaur, we detected an absorption feature in the Z-band that is uncommon among these bodies. A dynamical analysis of the target's orbit shows that 2012 DR30 moves on a relatively unstable orbit and was most likely only recently placed on its current orbit from the most distant and still highly unexplored regions of the Solar System. If categorised on dynamical grounds 2012 DR30 is the largest Damocloid and/or high inclination Centaur observed so far.
  • The increasing number of transiting exoplanets sparked a significant interest in discovering their moons. Most of the methods in the literature utilize timing analysis of the raw light curves. Here we propose a new approach for the direct detection of a moon in the transit light curves via the so called Scatter Peak. The essence of the method is the valuation of the local scatter in the folded light curves of many transits. We test the ability of this method with different simulations: Kepler "short cadence", Kepler "long cadence", ground-based millimagnitude photometry with 3-min cadence, and the expected data quality of the planned ESA mission of PLATO. The method requires ~100 transit observations, therefore applicable for moons of 10-20 day period planets, assuming 3-4-5 year long observing campaigns with space observatories. The success rate for finding a 1 R_Earth moon around a 1 R_Jupiter exoplanet turned out to be quite promising even for the simulated ground-based observations, while the detection limit of the expected PLATO data is around 0.4 R_Earth. We give practical suggestions for observations and data reduction to improve the chance of such a detection: (i) transit observations must include out-of-transit phases before and after a transit, spanning at least the same duration as the transit itself; (ii) any trend filtering must be done in such a way that the preceding and following out-of-transit phases remain unaffected.
  • The Kepler spacecraft is providing time series of photometric data with micromagnitude precision for hundreds of A-F type stars. We present a first general characterization of the pulsational behaviour of A-F type stars as observed in the Kepler light curves of a sample of 750 candidate A-F type stars. We propose three main groups to describe the observed variety in pulsating A-F type stars: gamma Dor, delta Sct, and hybrid stars. We assign 63% of our sample to one of the three groups, and identify the remaining part as rotationally modulated/active stars, binaries, stars of different spectral type, or stars that show no clear periodic variability. 23% of the stars (171 stars) are hybrid stars, which is a much larger fraction than what has been observed before. We characterize for the first time a large number of A-F type stars (475 stars) in terms of number of detected frequencies, frequency range, and typical pulsation amplitudes. The majority of hybrid stars show frequencies with all kinds of periodicities within the gamma Dor and delta Sct range, also between 5 and 10 c/d, which is a challenge for the current models. We find indications for the existence of delta Sct and gamma Dor stars beyond the edges of the current observational instability strips. The hybrid stars occupy the entire region within the delta Sct and gamma Dor instability strips, and beyond. Non-variable stars seem to exist within the instability strips. The location of gamma Dor and delta Sct classes in the (Teff,logg)-diagram has been extended. We investigate two newly constructed variables 'efficiency' and 'energy' as a means to explore the relation between gamma Dor and delta Sct stars. Our results suggest a revision of the current observational instability strips, and imply an investigation of other pulsation mechanisms to supplement the kappa mechanism and convective blocking effect to drive hybrid pulsations.
  • The number of known transiting exoplanets is rapidly increasing, which has recently inspired significant interest as to whether they can host a detectable moon. Although there has been no such example where the presence of a satellite was proven, several methods have already been investigated for such a detection in the future. All these methods utilize post-processing of the measured light curves, and the presence of the moon is decided by the distribution of a timing parameter. Here we propose a method for the detection of the moon directly in the raw transit light curves. When the moon is in transit, it puts its own fingerprint on the intensity variation. In realistic cases, this distortion is too little to be detected in the individual light curves, and must be amplified. Averaging the folded light curve of several transits helps decrease the scatter, but it is not the best approach because it also reduces the signal. The relative position of the moon varies from transit to transit, the moon's wing will appear in different positions on different sides of the planet's transit. Here we show that a careful analysis of the scatter curve of the folded light curves enhances the chance of detecting the exomoons directly.
  • We report on the discovery of new members of nearby young moving groups, exploiting the full power of combining the RAVE survey with several stellar age diagnostic methods and follow-up high-resolution optical spectroscopy. The results include the identification of one new and five likely members of the beta Pictoris moving group, ranging from spectral types F9 to M4 with the majority being M dwarfs, one K7 likely member of the epsilon Cha group and two stars in the Tuc-Hor association. Based on the positive identifications we foreshadow a great potential of the RAVE database in progressing toward a full census of young moving groups in the solar neighbourhood.
  • We analyse the results of a 5.5-yr photometric campaign that monitored 247 southern, semi-regular variables with relatively precise Hipparcos parallaxes to demonstrate an unambiguous detection of Red Giant Branch (RGB) pulsations in the solar neighbourhood. We show that Sequence A' contains a mixture of AGB and RGB stars, as indicated by a temperature related shift at the TRGB. Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Galactic sequences are compared in several ways to show that the P-L sequence zero-points have a negligible metallicity dependence. We describe a new method to determine absolute magnitudes from pulsation periods and calibrate the LMC distance modulus using Hipparcos parallaxes to find \mu (LMC) = 18.54 +- 0.03 mag. Several sources of systematic error are discussed to explain discrepancies between the MACHO and OGLE sequences in the LMC. We derive a relative distance modulus of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) relative to the LMC of \Delta \mu = 0.41 +- 0.02 mag. A comparison of other pulsation properties, including period-amplitude and luminosity-amplitude relations, confirms that RGB pulsation properties are consistent and universal, indicating that the RGB sequences are suitable as high-precision distance indicators. The M giants with the shortest periods bridge the gap between G and K giant solar-like oscillations and M-giant pulsation, revealing a smooth continuity as we ascend the giant branch.
  • It has been suggested that moons around transiting exoplanets may cause observable signal in transit photometry or in the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect. In this paper a detailed analysis of parameter reconstruction from the RM effect is presented for various planet-moon configurations, described with 20 parameters. We also demonstrate the benefits of combining photometry with the RM effect. We simulated 2.7x10^9 configurations of a generic transiting system to map the confidence region of the parameters of the moon, find the correlated parameters and determine the validity of reconstructions. The main conclusion is that the strictest constraints from the RM effect are expected for the radius of the moon. In some cases there is also meaningful information on its orbital period. When the transit time of the moon is exactly known, for example, from transit photometry, the angle parameters of the moon's orbit will also be constrained from the RM effect. From transit light curves the mass can be determined, and combining this result with the radius from the RM effect, the experimental determination of the density of the moon is also possible.
  • We present the results of a 5.5-year CCD photometric campaign that monitored 261 bright, southern, semi-regular variables with relatively precise Hipparcos parallaxes. The data are supplemented with independent photoelectric observations of 34 of the brightest stars, including 11 that were not part of the CCD survey, and a previously unpublished long time-series of VZ Cam. Pulsation periods and amplitudes are established for 247 of these stars, the majority of which have not been determined before. All M giants with sufficient observations for period determination are found to be variable, with 87% of the sample (at S/N >= 7.5) exhibiting multi-periodic behaviour. The period ratios of local SRVs are in excellent agreement with those in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Apparent K-band magnitudes are extracted from multiple NIR catalogues and analysed to determine the most reliable values. We review the effects of interstellar and circumstellar extinction and calculate absolute K-band magnitudes using revised Hipparcos parallaxes.
  • We have obtained H-band interferometric observations of three galactic red supergiant stars using the MIRC instrument on the CHARA array. The targets include AZ Cyg, a field RSG and two members of the Per OB1 association, RS Per and T Per. We find evidence of departures from circular symmetry in all cases, which can be modelled with the presence of hotspots. This is the first detection of these features in the $H$-band. The measured mean diameters and the spectral energy distributions were combined to determine effective temperatures. The results give further support to the recently derived hotter temperature scale of red supergiant stars by Levesque et al. (2005), which has been evoked to reconcile the empirically determined physical parameters and stellar evolutionary theories. We see a possible correlation between spottedness and mid-IR emission of the circumstellar dust, suggesting a connection between mass-loss and the mechanism that generates the spots.
  • We have carried out a photometric and spectroscopic survey of bright high-amplitude delta Scuti (HADS) stars. The aim was to detect binarity and multiperiodicity (or both) in order to explore the possibility of combining binary star astrophysics with stellar oscillations. Here we present the first results for ten, predominantly southern, HADS variables. We detected the orbital motion of RS Gru with a semi-amplitude of ~6.5 km/s and 11.5 days period. The companion is inferred to be a low-mass dwarf star in a close orbit around RS Gru. We found multiperiodicity in RY Lep both from photometric and radial velocity data and detected orbital motion in the radial velocities with hints of a possible period of 500--700 days. The data also revealed that the amplitude of the secondary frequency is variable on the time-scale of a few years, whereas the dominant mode is stable. Radial velocities of AD CMi revealed cycle-to-cycle variations which might be due to non-radial pulsations. We confirmed the multiperiodic nature of BQ Ind, while we obtained the first radial velocity curves of ZZ Mic and BE Lyn. The radial velocity curve and the O-C diagram of CY Aqr are consistent with the long-period binary hypothesis. We took new time series photometry on XX Cyg, DY Her and DY Peg, with which we updated their O-C diagrams.
  • The high-resolution setup of the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope makes it a beautiful radial velocity machine, with which one can measure velocities of up to 350-360 stars per exposure to +/-1--2 km/s in a 2-degree field of view. Here we present three case studies of star cluster kinematics, each based on data obtained on three nights in February 2008. The specific aims included: (i) cluster membership determination for NGC 2451A and B, two nearby open clusters in the same line-of-sight; (ii) a study of possible membership of the planetary nebula NGC 2438 in the open cluster M46; and (iii) the radial velocity dispersion of M4 and NGC 6144, a pair of two globular clusters near Antares. The results which came out of only three nights of AAT time illustrate very nicely the potential of the instrument and, for example, how quickly one can resolve decades of contradiction in less than two hours of net observing time.
  • We present new radial velocity measurements of 586 stars in a one-degree field centered on the open cluster M46, and the planetary nebula NGC 2438 located within a nuclear radius of the cluster. The data are based on medium-resolution optical and near-infrared spectra taken with the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. We find a velocity difference of about 30 km/s between the cluster and the nebula, thus removing all ambiguities about the cluster membership of the planetary nebula caused by contradicting results in the literature. The line-of-sight velocity dispersion of the cluster is 3.9+/-0.3 km/s, likely to be affected by a significant population of binary stars.
  • We present a new catalogue of variable stars compiled from data taken for the University of New South Wales Extrasolar Planet Search. From 2004 October to 2007 May, 25 target fields were each observed for 1-4 months, resulting in ~87000 high precision light curves with 1600-4400 data points. We have extracted a total of 850 variable light curves, 659 of which do not have a counterpart in either the General Catalog of Variable Stars, the New Suspected Variables catalogue or the All Sky Automated Survey southern variable star catalogue. The catalogue is detailed here, and includes 142 Algol-type eclipsing binaries, 23 beta Lyrae-type eclipsing binaries, 218 contact eclipsing binaries, 53 RR Lyrae stars, 26 Cepheid stars, 13 rotationally variable active stars, 153 uncategorised pulsating stars with periods <10 d, including delta Scuti stars, and 222 long period variableswith variability on timescales of >10 d. As a general application of variable stars discovered by extrasolar planet transit search projects, we discuss several astrophysical problems which could benefit from carefully selected samples of bright variables. These include: (i) the quest for contact binaries with the smallest mass ratio, which could be used to test theories of binary mergers; (ii) detached eclipsing binaries with pre-main-sequence components, which are important test objects for calibrating stellar evolutionary models; and (iii) RR Lyrae-type pulsating stars exhibiting the Blazhko-effect, which is one of the last great mysteries of pulsating star research.
  • Context: We investigate the distribution of optically high and low states of the system AM Herculis (AM Her). Aims: We determine the state duty cycles, and their relationships with the mass transfer process and binary orbital evolution of the system. Methods: We make use of the photographic plate archive of the Harvard College Observatory between 1890 and 1953 and visual observations collected by the American Association of Variable Star Observers between 1978 and 2005. We determine the statistical probability of the two states, their distribution and recurrence behaviors. Results: We find that the fractional high state duty cycle of the system AM Her is 63%. The data show no preference of timescales on which high or low states occur. However, there appears to be a pattern of long and short duty cycle alternation, suggesting that the state transitions retain memories. We assess models for the high/low states for polars (AM Her type systems). We propose that the white-dwarf magnetic field plays a key role in regulating the mass transfer rate and hence the high/low brightness states, due to variations in the magnetic-field configuration in the system.
  • Combining visual observations of SR variables with measurements of them using a photoelectric photometer is discussed then demonstrated using data obtained for the bright, southern SR variable theta Aps. Combining such observations is useful in that it can provide a more comprehensive set of data by extending the temporal coverage of the light curve. Typically there are systematic differences in the visual and photometric datasets that must be corrected for.
  • Using the AAOmega instrument of the Anglo-Australian Telescope, we have obtained medium-resolution near-infrared spectra of 10,500 stars in two-degree fields centered on the galactic globular clusters 47 Tuc, NGC 288, M12, M30 and M55. Radial velocities and equivalent widths of the infrared Ca II triplet lines have been determined to constrain cluster membership, which in turn has been used to study the angular extent of the clusters. From the analysis of 140-1000 member stars in each cluster, we do not find extended structures that go beyond the tidal radii. For three cluster we estimate a 1% upper limit of extra-tidal red giant branch stars. We detect systemic rotation in 47 Tuc and M55.
  • Eclipsing binaries offer a unique opportunity to determine fundamental physical parameters of stars using the constraints on the geometry of the systems. Here we present a reanalysis of publicly available two-color observations of about 6800 stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, obtained by the MACHO project between 1992 and 2000 and classified as eclipsing variable stars. Of these, less than half are genuine eclipsing binaries. We determined new periods and classified the stars, 3031 in total, using the Fourier parameters of the phased light curves. The period distribution is clearly bimodal, reflecting refer to the separate groups of more massive blue main sequence objects and low mass red giants. The latter resemble contact binaries and obey a period-luminosity relation. Using evolutionary models, we identified foreground stars. The presented database has been cleaned of artifacts and misclassified variables, thus allowing searches for apsidal motion, tertiary components, pulsating stars in binary systems and secular variations with time-scales of several years.
  • (Abridged) We studied the brightness and spectral evolution of the young eruptive star V1647 Ori during its recent outburst in the period 2004 February - 2006 Sep. We performed a photometric follow-up in the bands V, R_C, I_C, J, H, K_s as well as visible and near-IR spectroscopy. The main results are as follows: The brightness of V1647 Ori stayed more than 4 mag above the pre-outburst level until 2005 October when it started a rapid fading. In the high state we found a periodic component in the optical light curves with a period of 56 days. The delay between variations of the star and variations in the brightness of clump of nearby nebulosity corresponds to an angle of 61+/-14 degrees between the axis of the nebula and the line of sight. A steady decrease of HI emission line fluxes could be observed. In 2006 May, in the quiescent phase, the HeI 1.083 line was observed in emission, contrary to its deep blueshifted absorption observed during the outburst. The J-H and H-K_s color maps of the infrared nebula reveal an envelope around the star. The color distribution of the infrared nebula suggests reddening of the scattered light inside a thick circumstellar disk. We show that the observed properties of V1647 Ori could be interpreted in the framework of the thermal instability models of Bell et al. (1995). V1647 Ori might belong to a new class of young eruptive stars, defined by relatively short timescales, recurrent outbursts, modest increase in bolometric luminosity and accretion rate, and an evolutionary state earlier than that of typical EXors.
  • Aims: Detect tertiary components of close binaries from spectroscopy and light curve modelling; investigate light-travel time effect and the possibility of magnetic activity cycles; measure mass-ratios for unstudied systems and derive absolute parameters. Methods: We carried out new photometric and spectroscopic observations of five bright (V<10.5 mag) close eclipsing binaries, predominantly in the southern skies. We obtained full Johnson BV light curves, which were modelled with the Wilson-Devinney code. Radial velocities were measured with the cross-correlation method using IAU radial velocity standards as spectral templates. Period changes were studied with the O-C method, utilising published epochs of minimum light (XY Leo) and ASAS photometry (VZ Lib). Results: For three objects (DX Tuc, QY Hya, V870 Ara), absolute parameters have been determined for the first time. We detect spectroscopically the tertiary components in XY Leo, VZ Lib and discover one in QY Hya. For XY Leo we update the light-time effect parameters and detect a secondary periodicity of about 5100 d in the O$-$C diagram that may hint about the existence of short-period magnetic cycles. A combination of recent photometric data shows that the orbital period of the tertiary star in VZ Lib is likely to be over 1500 d. QY Hya is a semi-detached X-ray active binary in a triple system with K and M-type components, while V870 Ara is a contact binary with the third smallest spectroscopic mass-ratio for a W UMa star to date (q=0.082+/-0.030). This small mass-ratio, being close to the theoretical minimum for contact binaries, suggests that V870 Ara has the potential of constraining evolutionary scenarios of binary mergers. The inferred distances to these systems are compatible with the Hipparcos parallaxes.