• We present the results of prompt optical follow-up of the electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational-wave event GW170817 by the Transient Optical Robotic Observatory of the South Collaboration (TOROS). We detected highly significant dimming in the light curves of the counterpart (Delta g=0.17+-0.03 mag, Delta r=0.14+-0.02 mag, Delta i=0.10 +- 0.03 mag) over the course of only 80 minutes of observations obtained ~35 hr after the trigger with the T80-South telescope. A second epoch of observations, obtained ~59 hr after the event with the EABA 1.5m telescope, confirms the fast fading nature of the transient. The observed colors of the counterpart suggest that this event was a "blue kilonova" relatively free of lanthanides.
  • The evolution of massive stars surviving the red supergiant (RSG) stage remains unexplored due to the rarity of such objects. The yellow hypergiants (YHGs) appear to be the warm counterparts of post-RSG classes located near the Humphreys-Davidson upper luminosity limit, which are characterized by atmospheric instability and high mass-loss rates. We aim to increase the number of YHGs in M33 and thus to contribute to a better understanding of the pre-supernova evolution of massive stars. Optical spectroscopy of five dust-enshrouded YSGs selected from mid-IR criteria was obtained with the goal of detecting evidence of extensive atmospheres. We also analyzed BVI photometry for 21 of the most luminous YSGs in M33 to identify changes in the spectral type. To explore the properties of circumstellar dust, we performed SED-fitting of multi-band photometry of the 21 YSGs. We find three luminous YSGs in our sample to be YHG candidates, as they are surrounded by hot dust and are enshrouded within extended, cold dusty envelopes. Our spectroscopy of star 2 shows emission of more than one H$\alpha$ component, as well as emission of CaII, implying an extended atmospheric structure. In addition, the long-term monitoring of the star reveals a dimming in the visual light curve of amplitude larger than 0.5 mag that caused an apparent drop in the temperature that exceeded 500 K. We suggest the observed variability to be analogous to that of the Galactic YHG $\rho$ Cas. Five less luminous YSGs are suggested as post-RSG candidates showing evidence of hot or/and cool dust emission. We demonstrate that mid-IR photometry, combined with optical spectroscopy and time-series photometry, provide a robust method for identifying candidate YHGs. Future discovery of YHGs in Local Group galaxies is critical for the study of the late evolution of intermediate-mass massive stars.
  • We present the first direct distance determination to a detached eclipsing binary in M33, which was found by the DIRECT Project. Located in the OB 66 association at coordinates (alpha, delta)=(01:33:46.17,+30:44:39.9) for J2000.0, it was one of the most suitable detached eclipsing binaries found by DIRECT for distance determination, given its apparent magnitude and orbital period. We obtained follow-up BV time series photometry, JHKs photometry and optical spectroscopy from which we determined the parameters of the system. It contains two O7 main sequence stars with masses of 33.4+/-3.5 Mo and 30.0+/-3.3 Mo and radii of 12.3+/-0.4 Ro and 8.8+/-0.3 Ro, respectively. We derive temperatures of 37000+/-1500 K and 35600+/-1500 K. Using BVRJHKs photometry for the flux calibration, we obtain a distance modulus of 24.92+/-0.12 mag (964+/-54 kpc), which is ~0.3 mag longer than the Key Project distance to M33. We discuss the implications of our result and the importance of establishing M33 as an independent rung on the cosmological distance ladder.
  • We report on the discovery of Cepheids in the spiral galaxy NGC 2841, based on observations made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. NGC 2841 was observed over 12 epochs using the F555W filter, and over 5 epochs using the F814W filter. Photometry was performed using the DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME package. We discovered a total of 29 variables, including 18 high-quality Cepheids with periods ranging from 15 to 40 days. Period-luminosity relations in the V and I bands, based on the high-quality Cepheids, yield an extinction-corrected distance modulus of 30.74 +/- 0.23 mag, which corresponds to a distance of 14.1 +/- 1.5 Mpc. Our distance is based on an assumed LMC distance modulus of 18.50 +/- 0.10 mag (D = 50+/- 2.5 kpc) and a metallicity dependence of the Cepheid P-L relation of gamma (VI) = -0.2 +/- 0.2 mag/dex.
  • We report on the remarkable evolution in the light curve of a variable star discovered by Hubble (1926) in M33 and classified by him as a Cepheid. Early in the 20th century, the variable, designated as V19, exhibited a 54.7 day period, an intensity-weighted mean B magnitude of 19.59+/-0.23 mag, and a B amplitude of 1.1 mag. Its position in the P-L plane was consistent with the relation derived by Hubble from a total of 35 variables. Modern observations by the DIRECT project show a dramatic change in the properties of V19: its mean B magnitude has risen to 19.08 +/- 0.05 mag and its B amplitude has decreased to less than 0.1 mag. V19 does not appear to be a classical (Population I) Cepheid variable at present, and its nature remains a mystery. It is not clear how frequent such objects are nor how often they could be mistaken for classical Cepheids.
  • The DIRECT project aims to determine direct distances to two important galaxies in the cosmological distance ladder - M31 and M33 - using detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) and Cepheids. We present the results of the first large-scale CCD-based search for variables in M33. We have observed two fields located in the central region of M33 for a total of 95 nights on the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.2-m telescope and 36 nights on the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 1.3-m telescope. We have found a total of 544 variables, including 251 Cepheids and 47 eclipsing binaries. The catalog of variables is available online, along with finding charts and BVI light curve data (consisting of 8.2x10^4 individual measurements). The complete set of CCD frames is available upon request.
  • We present the results of near-infrared observations of extragalactic Cepheids made with the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The variables are located in the galaxies IC 1613, IC 4182, M 31, M 81, M 101, NGC 925, NGC 1365, NGC 2090, NGC 3198, NGC 3621, NGC 4496A and NGC 4536. All fields were observed in the F160W bandpass; additional images were obtained in the F110W and F205W filters. Photometry was performed using the DAOPHOT II/ALLSTAR package. Self-consistent distance moduli and color excesses were obtained by fitting Period-Luminosity relations in the H, I and V bands. Our results support the assumption of a standard reddening law adopted by the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. A companion paper will determine true distance moduli and explore the effects of metallicity on the Cepheid distance scale.
  • The DIRECT project aims to determine direct distances to two important galaxies in the cosmological distance ladder -- M31 and M33 -- using detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) and Cepheids. The search for these variables requires time-series photometry of large areas of the target galaxies and yields magnitudes and positions for tens of thousands of stellar objects, which may be of use to the astronomical community at large. During the first phase of the project, between September 1996 and October 1997, we were awarded 95 nights on the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.2 m telescope and 36 nights on the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT 1.3 m telescope to search for DEBs and Cepheids in the M31 and M33 galaxies. This paper, the first in our series of stellar catalogs, lists the positions, three-color photometry, and variability indices of 57,581 stars with 14.4 < V < 23.6 in the central part of M33. The catalog is available from our FTP site at ftp://cfa-ftp.harvard.edu/pub/kstanek/DIRECT/star_catalog/M33ABC/
  • We report on the discovery of Cepheids in the Virgo spiral galaxy NGC 4535, based on observations made with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. NGC 4535 is one of 18 galaxies observed as a part of The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale which aims to measure the Hubble constant to 10% accuracy. NGC 4535 was observed over 13 epochs using the F555W filter, and over 9 epochs using the F814W filter. The HST F555W and F814W data were transformed to the Johnson V and Kron-Cousins I magnitude systems, respectively. Photometry was performed using two independent programs, DoPHOT and DAOPHOT II/ALLFRAME. Period-luminosity relations in the V and I bands were constructed using 39 high-quality Cepheids present in our set of 50 variable candidates. We obtain a distance modulus of 31.02+/-0.26 mag, corresponding to a distance of 16.0+/-1.9 Mpc. Our distance estimate is based on values of mu = 18.50 +/- 0.10 mag and E(V-I) = 0.13 mag for the distance modulus and reddening of the LMC, respectively.