• Two classes of topological superconductors and Majorana modes in condensed matter systems are known to date: one, in which impurity disorder strongly suppresses topological superconducting gap and is detrimental to Majorana modes, and the other, where Majorana fermions are protected by disorder-robust superconductor gap. In this work we predict a third class of topological superconductivity and Majorana modes, in which they appear exclusively in the presence of impurity disorder. Observation and control of Majorana fermions and other non-Abelions often requires a symmetry leading to a gap in a single-particle spectra. Disorder introduces states into the gap and enables conductance and proximity-induced superconductivity via the in-gap states. We show that disorder-enabled topological superconductivity can be realized in a quantum Hall ferromagnet, when helical domain walls are coupled to an s-wave superconductor. Solving a general quantum mechanical problem of impurity bound states in a system of spin-orbit coupled Landau levels, we show that disorder-induced Majorana modes emerge in a setting of the quantum Hall ferromagnetic transition in a CdMnTe quantum wells at a filling factor $\nu=2$. Recent experiments on transport through electrostatically controlled single domain wall in this system indicated the vital role of disorder in conductance, but left an unresolved question whether this could intrinsically preclude generation of Majorana fermions. The proposed resolution of the problem, demonstrating emergence of Majorana fermions exclusively due to impurity disorder, opens a path forward. We show that electrostatic control of domain walls in an integer quantum Hall ferromagnet allows manipulation of Majorana modes. Similar physics can emerge for ferromagnetic transitions in the fractional quantum Hall regime leading to the formation and control of higher order non-Abelian excitations.
  • We report drastically different onset temperatures of the reentrant integer quantum Hall states in the second and third Landau level. This finding is in quantitative disagreement with the Hartree-Fock theory of the bubble phases which is thought to describe these reentrant states. Our results indicate that the number of electrons per bubble in either the second or the third Landau level is likely different than predicted.
  • We use spatial spin separation by a magnetic focusing technique to probe the polarization of quantum point contacts. The point contacts are fabricated from p-type GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. A finite polarization is measured in the low-density regime, when the conductance of a point contact is tuned to <2e^2/h. Polarization is stronger in samples with a well defined ``0.7 structure''
  • Charged carriers with different spin states are spatially separated in a two-dimensional hole gas. Due to strong spin-orbit interaction holes at the Fermi energy have different momenta for two possible spin states travelling in the same direction and, correspondingly, different cyclotron orbits in a weak magnetic field. Two point contacts, acting as a monochromatic source of ballistic holes and a narrow detector in the magnetic focusing geometry are demonstrated to work as a tunable spin filter.
  • Recently developed AFM local anodic oxidation (LAO) technique offers a convenient way of patterning nanodevices, but imposes even more stringent requirements on the underlying quantum well structure. We developed a new very shallow quantum well design which allows the depth and density of the 2D gas to be independently controlled during the growth. A high mobility (0.5 10^6 cm^2/Vs at 4.2 K) 2D hole gas just 350A below the surface is demonstrated. A quantum point contact, fabricated by AFM LAO nanopatterning from this wafer, shows 9 quantum steps at 50 mK.
  • We show that the coherence of charge transfer through a weakly coupled double-dot dimer can be determined by analyzing the statistics of the conductance pattern, and does not require large phase coherence length in the host material. We present an experimental study of the charge transport through a small Si nanostructure, which contains two quantum dots. The transport through the dimer is shown to be coherent. At the same time, one of the dots is strongly coupled to the leads, and the overall transport is dominated by inelastic co-tunneling processes.
  • We report unexpected fluctuations in the positions of Coulomb blockade peaks at high magnetic fields in a small Si quantum dot. The fluctuations have a distinctive saw-tooth pattern: as a function of magnetic field, linear shifts of peak positions are compensated by abrupt jumps in the opposite direction. The linear shifts have large slopes, suggesting formation of the ground state with a non-zero angular momentum. The value of the momentum is found to be well defined, despite the absence of the rotational symmetry in the dot.
  • We have studied the magnetic field dependence of the ground state energies in a small Si quantum dot. At low fields the first five electrons are added in a spin-up -- spin-down sequence minimizing the total spin. This sequence does not hold for larger number of electrons in the dot. At high fields the dot undergoes transitions between states with different spins driven entirely by Zeeman energy. We identify some features that can be attributed to transitions between different spin configurations preserving the total spin of the dot. For a few peaks we observed large linear shifts that correspond to the change of the spin of the dot by 3/2. Such a change requires that an electron in the dot flips its spin during every tunneling event.
  • We studied transport through ultra-small Si quantum dot transistors fabricated from silicon-on-insulator wafers. At high temperatures, 4K<T<100K, the devices show single-electron or single-hole transport through the lithographically defined dot. At T<4K, current through the devices is characterized by multidot transport. From the analysis of the transport in samples with double-dot characteristics, we conclude that extra dots are formed inside the thermally grown gate oxide which surrounds the lithographically defined dot.
  • We have studied low-temperature single electron transport through ultra-small Si quantum dots. We find that at low temperatures Coulomb blockade is partially lifted at certain gate voltages. Furthermore, we observed an enhancement of differential conductance at zero bias. The magnetic field dependence of this zero bias anomaly is very different from the one reported in GaAs quantum dots, inconsistent with predictions for the Kondo effect.