• Detecting and characterizing the Epoch of Reionization and Cosmic Dawn via the redshifted 21-cm hyperfine line of neutral hydrogen will revolutionize the study of the formation of the first stars, galaxies, black holes and intergalactic gas in the infant Universe. The wealth of information encoded in this signal is, however, buried under foregrounds that are many orders of magnitude brighter. These must be removed accurately and precisely in order to reveal the feeble 21-cm signal. This requires not only the modeling of the Galactic and extra-galactic emission, but also of the often stochastic residuals due to imperfect calibration of the data caused by ionospheric and instrumental distortions. To stochastically model these effects, we introduce a new method based on `Gaussian Process Regression' (GPR) which is able to statistically separate the 21-cm signal from most of the foregrounds and other contaminants. Using simulated LOFAR-EoR data that include strong instrumental mode-mixing, we show that this method is capable of recovering the 21-cm signal power spectrum across the entire range $k = 0.07 - 0.3 \ \rm{h\, cMpc^{-1}}$. The GPR method is most optimal, having minimal and controllable impact on the 21-cm signal, when the foregrounds are correlated on frequency scales $\gtrsim 3$\,MHz and the rms of the signal has $\sigma_{\mathrm{21cm}} \gtrsim 0.1\,\sigma_{\mathrm{noise}}$. This signal separation improves the 21-cm power-spectrum sensitivity by a factor $\gtrsim 3$ compared to foreground avoidance strategies and enables the sensitivity of current and future 21-cm instruments such as the {\sl Square Kilometre Array} to be fully exploited.
  • For subspace estimation with an unknown colored noise, Factor Analysis (FA) is a good candidate for replacing the popular eigenvalue decomposition (EVD). Finding the unknowns in factor analysis can be done by solving a non-linear least square problem. For this type of optimization problems, the Gauss-Newton (GN) algorithm is a powerful and simple method. The most expensive part of the GN algorithm is finding the direction of descent by solving a system of equations at each iteration. In this paper we show that for FA, the matrices involved in solving these systems of equations can be diagonalized in a closed form fashion and the solution can be found in a computationally efficient way. We show how the unknown parameters can be updated without actually constructing these matrices. The convergence performance of the algorithm is studied via numerical simulations.
  • Direct detection of the Epoch of Reionization via the redshifted 21-cm line will have unprecedented implications on the study of structure formation in the early Universe. To fulfill this promise current and future 21-cm experiments will need to detect the weak 21-cm signal over foregrounds several order of magnitude greater. This requires accurate modeling of the galactic and extragalactic emission and of its contaminants due to instrument chromaticity, ionosphere and imperfect calibration. To solve for this complex modeling, we propose a new method based on Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) which is able to cleanly separate the cosmological signal from most of the foregrounds contaminants. We also propose a new imaging method based on a maximum likelihood framework which solves for the interferometric equation directly on the sphere. Using this method, chromatic effects causing the so-called "wedge" are effectively eliminated (i.e. deconvolved) in the cylindrical ($k_{\perp}, k_{\parallel}$) power spectrum.
  • New and upcoming radio interferometers will produce unprecedented amounts of data that demand extremely powerful computers for processing. This is a limiting factor due to the large computational power and energy costs involved. Such limitations restrict several key data processing steps in radio interferometry. One such step is calibration where systematic errors in the data are determined and corrected. Accurate calibration is an essential component in reaching many scientific goals in radio astronomy and the use of consensus optimization that exploits the continuity of systematic errors across frequency significantly improves calibration accuracy. In order to reach full consensus, data at all frequencies need to be calibrated simultaneously. In the SKA regime, this can become intractable if the available compute agents do not have the resources to process data from all frequency channels simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a multiplexing scheme that is based on the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) with cyclic updates. With this scheme, it is possible to simultaneously calibrate the full dataset using far fewer compute agents than the number of frequencies at which data are available. We give simulation results to show the feasibility of the proposed multiplexing scheme in simultaneously calibrating a full dataset when a limited number of compute agents are available.
  • We present the first limits on the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) 21-cm HI power spectra, in the redshift range $z=7.9-10.6$, using the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) High-Band Antenna (HBA). In total 13\,h of data were used from observations centred on the North Celestial Pole (NCP). After subtraction of the sky model and the noise bias, we detect a non-zero $\Delta^2_{\rm I} = (56 \pm 13 {\rm mK})^2$ (1-$\sigma$) excess variance and a best 2-$\sigma$ upper limit of $\Delta^2_{\rm 21} < (79.6 {\rm mK})^2$ at $k=0.053$$h$cMpc$^{-1}$ in the range $z=$9.6-10.6. The excess variance decreases when optimizing the smoothness of the direction- and frequency-dependent gain calibration, and with increasing the completeness of the sky model. It is likely caused by (i) residual side-lobe noise on calibration baselines, (ii) leverage due to non-linear effects, (iii) noise and ionosphere-induced gain errors, or a combination thereof. Further analyses of the excess variance will be discussed in forthcoming publications.
  • We present an exploration of the mass structure of a sample of 12 strongly lensed massive, compact early-type galaxies at redshifts $z\sim0.6$ to provide further possible evidence for their inside-out growth. We obtain new ESI/Keck spectroscopy and infer the kinematics of both lens and source galaxies, and combine these with existing photometry to construct (a) the fundamental plane (FP) of the source galaxies and (b) physical models for their dark and luminous mass structure. We find their FP to be tilted towards the virial plane relative to the local FP, and attribute this to their unusual compactness, which causes their kinematics to be totally dominated by the stellar mass as opposed to their dark matter; that their FP is nevertheless still inconsistent with the virial plane implies that both the stellar and dark structure of early-type galaxies is non-homologous. We also find the intrinsic scatter of their FP to be comparable to the local value, indicating that variations in the stellar mass structure outweight variations in the dark halo in the central regions of early-type galaxies. Finally, we show that inference on the dark halo structure -- and, in turn, the underlying physics -- is sensitive to assumptions about the stellar initial mass function (IMF), but that physically-motivated assumptions about the IMF imply haloes with sub-NFW inner density slopes, and may present further evidence for the inside-out growth of compact early-type galaxies via minor mergers and accretion.
  • We present a new sample of strong gravitational lens systems where both the foreground lenses and background sources are early-type galaxies. Using imaging from HST/ACS and Keck/NIRC2, we model the surface brightness distributions and show that the sources form a distinct population of massive, compact galaxies at redshifts $0.4 \lesssim z \lesssim 0.7$, lying systematically below the size-mass relation of the global elliptical galaxy population at those redshifts. These may therefore represent relics of high-redshift red nuggets or their partly-evolved descendants. We exploit the magnifying effect of lensing to investigate the structural properties, stellar masses and stellar populations of these objects with a view to understanding their evolution. We model these objects parametrically and find that they generally require two S\'ersic components to properly describe their light profiles, with one more spheroidal component alongside a more envelope-like component, which is slightly more extended though still compact. This is consistent with the hypothesis of the inside-out growth of these objects via minor mergers. We also find that the sources can be characterised by red-to-blue colour gradients as a function of radius which are stronger at low redshift -- indicative of ongoing accretion -- but that their environments generally appear consistent with that of the general elliptical galaxy population, contrary to recent suggestions that these objects are predominantly associated with clusters.
  • Recent studies based on the integrated light of distant galaxies suggest that the initial mass function (IMF) might not be universal. Variations of the IMF with galaxy type and/or formation time may have important consequences for our understanding of galaxy evolution. We have developed a new stellar population synthesis (SPS) code specifically designed to reconstruct the IMF. We implement a novel approach combining regularization with hierarchical Bayesian inference. Within this approach we use a parametrized IMF prior to regulate a direct inference of the IMF. This direct inference gives more freedom to the IMF and allows the model to deviate from parametrized models when demanded by the data. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling techniques to reconstruct the best parameters for the IMF prior, the age, and the metallicity of a single stellar population. We present our code and apply our model to a number of mock single stellar populations with different ages, metallicities, and IMFs. When systematic uncertainties are not significant, we are able to reconstruct the input parameters that were used to create the mock populations. Our results show that if systematic uncertainties do play a role, this may introduce a bias on the results. Therefore, it is important to objectively compare different ingredients of SPS models. Through its Bayesian framework, our model is well-suited for this.
  • Visibility scintillation resulting from wave propagation through the turbulent ionosphere can be an important sources of noise at low radio frequencies ($\nu\lesssim 200$ MHz). Many low frequency experiments are underway to detect the power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations of the neutral-hydrogen $21$-cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EOR: $12\gtrsim z\gtrsim 7$, $100\lesssim \nu \lesssim 175$ MHz). In this paper, we derive scintillation noise power-spectra in such experiments while taking into account the effects of typical data processing operations such as self-calibration and Fourier synthesis. We find that for minimally redundant arrays such as LOFAR and MWA, scintillation noise is of the same order of magnitude as thermal noise, has a spectral coherence dictated by stretching of the snapshot $uv$-coverage with frequency, and thus is confined to the well known wedge-like structure in the cylindrical ($2$-dimensional) power spectrum space. Compact, fully redundant ($d_{\rm core}\lesssim r_{\rm F} \approx 300$ m at $150$ MHz) arrays such as HERA and SKA-LOW (core) will be scintillation noise dominated at all baselines, but the spatial and frequency coherence of this noise will allow it to be removed along with spectrally smooth foregrounds.
  • In this paper, we consider random phase fluctuations imposed during wave propagation through a turbulent plasma (e.g. ionosphere) as a source of additional noise in interferometric visibilities. We derive expressions for visibility variance for the wide field of view case (FOV$\sim10$ deg) by computing the statistics of Fresnel diffraction from a stochastic plasma, and provide an intuitive understanding. For typical ionospheric conditions (diffractive scale $\sim 5-20$ km at $150$ MHz), we show that the resulting ionospheric `scintillation noise' can be a dominant source of uncertainty at low frequencies ($\nu \lesssim 200$ MHz). Consequently, low frequency widefield radio interferometers must take this source of uncertainty into account in their sensitivity analysis. We also discuss the spatial, temporal, and spectral coherence properties of scintillation noise that determine its magnitude in deep integrations, and influence prospects for its mitigation via calibration or filtering.
  • G.H. Heald, R.F. Pizzo, E. Orrú, R.P. Breton, D. Carbone, C. Ferrari, M.J. Hardcastle, W. Jurusik, G. Macario, D. Mulcahy, D. Rafferty, A. Asgekar, M. Brentjens, R.A. Fallows, W. Frieswijk, M.C. Toribio, B. Adebahr, M. Arts, M.R. Bell, A. Bonafede, J. Bray, J. Broderick, T. Cantwell, P. Carroll, Y. Cendes, A.O. Clarke, J. Croston, S. Daiboo, F. de Gasperin, J. Gregson, J. Harwood, T. Hassall, V. Heesen, A. Horneffer, A.J. van der Horst, M. Iacobelli, V. Jelić, D. Jones, D. Kant, G. Kokotanekov, P. Martin, J.P. McKean, L.K. Morabito, B. Nikiel-Wroczyński, A. Offringa, V.N. Pandey, M. Pandey-Pommier, M. Pietka, L. Pratley, C. Riseley, A. Rowlinson, J. Sabater, A.M.M. Scaife, L.H.A. Scheers, K. Sendlinger, A. Shulevski, M. Sipior, C. Sobey, A.J. Stewart, A. Stroe, J. Swinbank, C. Tasse, J. Trüstedt, E. Varenius, S. van Velzen, N. Vilchez, R.J. van Weeren, S. Wijnholds, W.L. Williams, A.G. de Bruyn, R. Nijboer, M. Wise, A. Alexov, J. Anderson, I.M. Avruch, R. Beck, M.E. Bell, I. van Bemmel, M.J. Bentum, G. Bernardi, P. Best, F. Breitling, W.N. Brouw, M. Brüggen, H.R. Butcher, B. Ciardi, J.E. Conway, E. de Geus, A. de Jong, M. de Vos, A. Deller, R.J. Dettmar, S. Duscha, J. Eislöffel, D. Engels, H. Falcke, R. Fender, M.A. Garrett, J. Grießmeier, A.W. Gunst, J.P. Hamaker, J.W.T. Hessels, M. Hoeft, J. Hörandel, H.A. Holties, H. Intema, N.J. Jackson, E. Jütte, A. Karastergiou, W.F.A. Klijn, V.I. Kondratiev, L.V.E. Koopmans, M. Kuniyoshi, G. Kuper, C. Law, J. van Leeuwen, M. Loose, P. Maat, S. Markoff, R. McFadden, D. McKay-Bukowski, M. Mevius, J.C.A. Miller-Jones, R. Morganti, H. Munk, A. Nelles, J.E. Noordam, M.J. Norden, H. Paas, A.G. Polatidis, W. Reich, A. Renting, H. Röttgering, A. Schoenmakers, D. Schwarz, J. Sluman, O. Smirnov, B.W. Stappers, M. Steinmetz, M. Tagger, Y. Tang, S. ter Veen, S. Thoudam, R. Vermeulen, C. Vocks, C. Vogt, R.A.M.J. Wijers, O. Wucknitz, S. Yatawatta, P. Zarka
    Sept. 3, 2015 astro-ph.IM
    We present the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS), the first northern-sky LOFAR imaging survey. In this introductory paper, we first describe in detail the motivation and design of the survey. Compared to previous radio surveys, MSSS is exceptional due to its intrinsic multifrequency nature providing information about the spectral properties of the detected sources over more than two octaves (from 30 to 160 MHz). The broadband frequency coverage, together with the fast survey speed generated by LOFAR's multibeaming capabilities, make MSSS the first survey of the sort anticipated to be carried out with the forthcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Two of the sixteen frequency bands included in the survey were chosen to exactly overlap the frequency coverage of large-area Very Large Array (VLA) and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) surveys at 74 MHz and 151 MHz respectively. The survey performance is illustrated within the "MSSS Verification Field" (MVF), a region of 100 square degrees centered at J2000 (RA,Dec)=(15h,69deg). The MSSS results from the MVF are compared with previous radio survey catalogs. We assess the flux and astrometric uncertainties in the catalog, as well as the completeness and reliability considering our source finding strategy. We determine the 90% completeness levels within the MVF to be 100 mJy at 135 MHz with 108" resolution, and 550 mJy at 50 MHz with 166" resolution. Images and catalogs for the full survey, expected to contain 150,000-200,000 sources, will be released to a public web server. We outline the plans for the ongoing production of the final survey products, and the ultimate public release of images and source catalogs.
  • We present the X-shooter Lens Survey (XLENS) data. The main goal of XLENS is to disentangle the stellar and dark matter content of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs), through combined strong gravitational lensing, dynamics and spectroscopic stellar population studies. The sample consists of 11 lens galaxies covering the redshift range from $0.1$ to $0.45$ and having stellar velocity dispersions between $250$ and $380\,\mathrm{km}\,\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. All galaxies have multi-band, high-quality HST imaging. We have obtained long-slit spectra of the lens galaxies with X-shooter on the VLT. We are able to disentangle the dark and luminous mass components by combining lensing and extended kinematics data-sets, and we are also able to precisely constrain stellar mass-to-light ratios and infer the value of the low-mass cut-off of the IMF, by adding spectroscopic stellar population information. Our goal is to correlate these IMF parameters with ETG masses and investigate the relation between baryonic and non-baryonic matter during the mass assembly and structure formation processes. In this paper we provide an overview of the survey, highlighting its scientific motivations, main goals and techniques. We present the current sample, briefly describing the data reduction and analysis process, and we present the first results on spatially resolved kinematics.
  • We have started a systematic search of strong lens candidates in the ESO public survey KiDS based on the visual inspection of massive galaxies in the redshift range $0.1<z<0.5$. As a pilot program we have inspected 100 sq. deg., which overlap with SDSS and where there are known lenses to use as a control sample. Taking advantage of the superb image quality of VST/OmegaCAM, the colour information and accurate model subtracted images, we have found 18 new lens candidates, for which spectroscopic confirmation will be needed to confirm their lensing nature and study the mass profile of the lensing galaxies.
  • Observations of the EoR with the 21-cm hyperfine emission of neutral hydrogen (HI) promise to open an entirely new window onto the formation of the first stars, galaxies and accreting black holes. In order to characterize the weak 21-cm signal, we need to develop imaging techniques which can reconstruct the extended emission very precisely. Here, we present an inversion technique for LOFAR baselines at NCP, based on a Bayesian formalism with optimal spatial regularization, which is used to reconstruct the diffuse foreground map directly from the simulated visibility data. We notice the spatial regularization de-noises the images to a large extent, allowing one to recover the 21-cm power-spectrum over a considerable $k_{\perp}-k_{\para}$ space in the range of $0.03\,{\rm Mpc^{-1}}<k_{\perp}<0.19\,{\rm Mpc^{-1}}$ and $0.14\,{\rm Mpc^{-1}}<k_{\para}<0.35\,{\rm Mpc^{-1}}$ without subtracting the noise power-spectrum. We find that, in combination with using the GMCA, a non-parametric foreground removal technique, we can mostly recover the spherically average power-spectrum within $2\sigma$ statistical fluctuations for an input Gaussian random rms noise level of $60 \, {\rm mK}$ in the maps after 600 hrs of integration over a $10 \, {\rm MHz}$ bandwidth.
  • We conduct a detailed lensing, dynamics and stellar population analysis of nine massive lens early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the X-Shooter Lens Survey (XLENS). Combining gravitational lensing constraints from HST imaging with spatially-resolved kinematics and line-indices constraints from VLT X-Shooter (XSH) spectra, we infer the low-mass slope and the low cut-off mass of the stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF): $x_{250}=2.37^{+0.12}_{-0.12}$ and $M_{{\rm low}, 250}= 0.131^{+0.023}_{-0.026}\, M_{\odot}$, respectively, for a reference point with $\sigma \equiv 250\, {{\rm kms}}^{-1}$ and R$_{{\rm eff}} \equiv 10$ kpc. All the XLENS systems are consistent with an IMF slope steeper than Milky Way-like. We find no significant correlations between IMF slope and any other quantity, except for an anti-correlation between total dynamical mass density and low-mass IMF slope at the 87% CL [$dx/d\log(\rho)$ = $ -0.19^{+0.15}_{-0.15}$]. This anti-correlation is consistent with the low redshift lenses found by Smith et al. (2015) that have high velocity dispersions and high stellar mass densities but surprisingly shallow IMF slopes.
  • We present the results of a search for galaxy substructures in a sample of 11 gravitational lens galaxies from the Sloan Lens ACS Survey. We find no significant detection of mass clumps, except for a luminous satellite in the system SDSS J0956+5110. We use these non-detections, in combination with a previous detection in the system SDSS J0946+1006, to derive constraints on the substructure mass function in massive early-type host galaxies with an average redshift z ~ 0.2 and an average velocity dispersion of 270 km/s. We perform a Bayesian inference on the substructure mass function, within a median region of about 32 kpc squared around the Einstein radius (~4.2 kpc). We infer a mean projected substructure mass fraction $f = 0.0076^{+0.0208}_{-0.0052}$ at the 68 percent confidence level and a substructure mass function slope $\alpha$ < 2.93 at the 95 percent confidence level for a uniform prior probability density on alpha. For a Gaussian prior based on Cold Dark Matter (CDM) simulations, we infer $f = 0 .0064^{+0.0080}_{-0.0042}$ and a slope of $\alpha$ = 1.90$^{+0.098}_{-0.098}$ at the 68 percent confidence level. Since only one substructure was detected in the full sample, we have little information on the mass function slope, which is therefore poorly constrained (i.e. the Bayes factor shows no positive preference for any of the two models).The inferred fraction is consistent with the expectations from CDM simulations and with inference from flux ratio anomalies at the 68 percent confidence level.
  • Galaxy masses play a fundamental role in our understanding of structure formation models. This review addresses the variety and reliability of mass estimators that pertain to stars, gas, and dark matter. The different sections on masses from stellar populations, dynamical masses of gas-rich and gas-poor galaxies, with some attention paid to our Milky Way, and masses from weak and strong lensing methods, all provide review material on galaxy masses in a self-consistent manner.
  • Obtaining lensing time delay measurements requires long-term monitoring campaigns with a high enough resolution (< 1 arcsec) to separate the multiple images. In the radio, a limited number of high-resolution interferometer arrays make these observations difficult to schedule. To overcome this problem, we propose a technique for measuring gravitational time delays which relies on monitoring the total flux density with low-resolution but high-sensitivity radio telescopes to follow the variation of the brighter image. This is then used to trigger high-resolution observations in optimal numbers which then reveal the variation in the fainter image. We present simulations to assess the efficiency of this method together with a pilot project observing radio lens systems with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) to trigger Very Large Array (VLA) observations. This new method is promising for measuring time delays because it uses relatively small amounts of time on high-resolution telescopes. This will be important because instruments that have high sensitivity but limited resolution, together with an optimum usage of followup high-resolution observations from appropriate radio telescopes may in the future be useful for gravitational lensing time delay measurements by means of this new method.
  • The redshifted 21 cm brightness distribution from neutral hydrogen is a promising probe into the cosmic dark ages, cosmic dawn, and re-ionization. LOFAR's Low Band Antennas (LBA) may be used in the frequency range 45 MHz to 85 MHz (30>z>16) to measure the sky averaged redshifted 21 cm brightness temperature as a function of frequency, or equivalently, cosmic redshift. These low frequencies are affected by strong Galactic foreground emission that is observed through frequency dependent ionospheric and antenna beam distortions which lead to chromatic mixing of spatial structure into spectral structure. Using simple models, we show that (i) the additional antenna temperature due to ionospheric refraction and absorption are at a \sim 1% level--- 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than the expected 21 cm signal, and have an approximate \nu^{-2} dependence, (ii) ionospheric refraction leads to a knee-like modulation on the sky spectrum at \nu\approx 4\times plasma frequency. Using more realistic simulations, we show that in the measured sky spectrum, more than 50% of the 21 cm signal variance can be lost to confusion from foregrounds and chromatic effects. We conclude that foregrounds and chromatic mixing may not be subtracted as generic functions of frequency as previously thought, but must rather be carefully modeled using additional priors and interferometric measurements.
  • We present the first results from the X-shooter Lens Survey (XLENS): an analysis of the massive early-type galaxy SDSS J1148+1930 at redshift z=0.444. We combine its extended kinematic profile -derived from spectra obtained with X-shooter on the ESO VLT- with strong gravitational lensing and multi-color information derived from SDSS images. Our main results are (i) The luminosity-weighted stellar velocity dispersion is \sigma *(<Reff) = 351\pm10 km/s, extracted from a rectangular aperture of 1.8"x1.6", more accurate and considerably lower than a previously published value of \sim450km/s. (ii) A single-component (stellar plus dark) mass model of the lens galaxy yields a logarithmic total-density slope of {\gamma}' = 1.72+0.05-0.06. (iii) The projected stellar mass fraction, derived solely from lensing, is f*(<Reff) = 0.19+0.04-0.09 inside the Einstein radius for a Hernquist profile and no anisotropy. The dark-matter fraction inside the effective radius f_DM(<Reff) = 0.60+0.15\pm0.1. (iv) Based on the SDSS colors, we find f*(<Reff)=0.17 \pm 0.06 for a Salpeter IMF and f*(<Reff)=0.07 \pm 0.02 for a Chabrier IMF. The lensing and dynamics constraints on the stellar mass fraction agree well with those independently derived from the SDSS colors for a Salpeter IMF, preferred over Chabrier IMF at variance with standard results for lower mass galaxies. Dwarf-rich IMFs in the lower mass range of 0.1-0.7 solar mass, with {\alpha} >= 3 (with dN/dM \propto M^(-{\alpha})) -such as that recently suggested for massive ETGs- are excluded at the > 90 % C.L. and in some cases violate the total lensing-derived mass limit. We conclude that this very massive ETG is dark-matter dominated inside one effective radius, consistent with the trend recently found from massive SLACS galaxies, with a IMF normalization consistent with Salpeter.
  • The aim of the new generation of radio synthesis arrays such as LOFAR and SKA is to achieve much higher sensitivity, resolution and frequency coverage than what is available now, especially at low frequencies. To accomplish this goal, the accuracy of the calibration techniques used is of considerable importance. Moreover, since these telescopes produce huge amounts of data, speed of convergence of calibration is a major bottleneck. The errors in calibration are due to system noise (sky and instrumental) as well as the estimation errors introduced by the calibration technique itself, which we call solver noise. We define solver noise as the distance between the optimal solution (the true value of the unknowns, uncorrupted by the system noise) and the solution obtained by calibration. We present the Space Alternating Generalized Expectation Maximization (SAGE) calibration technique, which is a modification of the Expectation Maximization algorithm, and compare its performance with the traditional Least Squares calibration based on the level of solver noise introduced by each technique. For this purpose, we develop statistical methods that use the calibrated solutions to estimate the level of solver noise. The SAGE calibration algorithm yields very promising results both in terms of accuracy and speed of convergence. The comparison approaches we adopt introduce a new framework for assessing the performance of different calibration schemes.
  • The Hubble constant value is currently known to 10% accuracy unless assumptions are made for the cosmology (Sandage et al. 2006). Gravitational lens systems provide another probe of the Hubble constant using time delay measurements. However, current investigations of ~20 time delay lenses, albeit of varying levels of sophistication, have resulted in different values of the Hubble constant ranging from 50-80 km/s/Mpc. In order to reduce uncertainties, more time delay measurements are essential together with better determined mass models (Oguri 2007, Saha et al. 2006). We propose a more efficient technique for measuring time delays which does not require regular monitoring with a high-resolution interferometer array. The method uses double image and long-axis quadruple lens systems in which the brighter component varies first and dominates the total flux density. Monitoring the total flux density with low-resolution but high sensitivity radio telescopes provides the variation of the brighter image and is used to trigger high-resolution observations which can then be used to see the variation in the fainter image. We present simulations of this method together with a pilot project using the WSRT (Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope) to trigger VLA (Very Large Array) observations. This new method is promising for measuring time delays because it uses relatively small amounts of time on high-resolution telescopes. This will be important because many SKA pathfinder telescopes, such as MeerKAT (Karoo Array Telescope) and ASKAP (Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder), have high sensitivity but limited resolution.
  • In the coming years a new insight into galaxy formation and the thermal history of the Universe is expected to come from the detection of the highly redshifted cosmological 21 cm line. The cosmological 21 cm line signal is buried under Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds which are likely to be a few orders of magnitude brighter. Strategies and techniques for effective subtraction of these foreground sources require a detailed knowledge of their structure in both intensity and polarization on the relevant angular scales of 1-30 arcmin. We present results from observations conducted with the Westerbork telescope in the 140-160 MHz range with 2 arcmin resolution in two fields located at intermediate Galactic latitude, centred around the bright quasar 3C196 and the North Celestial Pole. They were observed with the purpose of characterizing the foreground properties in sky areas where actual observations of the cosmological 21 cm line could be carried out. The polarization data were analysed through the rotation measure synthesis technique. We have computed total intensity and polarization angular power spectra. Total intensity maps were carefully calibrated, reaching a high dynamic range, 150000:1 in the case of the 3C196 field. [abridged]
  • A tomographic method is described to quantify the three-dimensional power-spectrum of the ionospheric electron-density fluctuations based on radio-interferometric observations by a two-dimensional planar array. The method is valid to first-order Born approximation and might be applicable to correct observed visibilities for phase variations due to the imprint of the full three-dimensional ionosphere. It is shown that not the ionospheric electron density distribution is the primary structure to model in interferometry, but its autocorrelation function or equivalent its power-spectrum. An exact mathematical expression is derived that provides the three dimensional power-spectrum of the ionospheric electron-density fluctuations directly from a rescaled scattered intensity field and an incident intensity field convolved with a complex unit phasor that depends on the w-term and is defined on the full sky pupil plane. In the limit of a small field of view, the method reduces to the single phase screen approximation. Tomographic self-calibration can become important in high-dynamic range observations at low radio frequencies with wide-field antenna interferometers, because a three-dimensional ionosphere causes a spatially varying convolution of the sky, whereas a single phase screen results in a spatially invariant convolution. A thick ionosphere can therefore not be approximated by a single phase screen without introducing errors in the calibration process. By applying a Radon projection and the Fourier projection-slice theorem, it is shown that the phase-screen approach in three dimensions is identical to the tomographic method. Finally we suggest that residual speckle can cause a diffuse intensity halo around sources, due to uncorrectable ionospheric phase fluctuations in the short integrations, which could pose a fundamental limit on the dynamic range in long-integration images.
  • We report the detection of a dark substructure through direct gravitational imaging - undetected in the HST-ACS F814W image - in the gravitational lens galaxy of SLACS SDSSJ0946+1006 (the "Double Einstein Ring"). The detection is based on a Bayesian grid reconstruction of the two-dimensional surface density of the galaxy inside an annulus around its Einstein radius (few kpc). [...] We confirm this detection by modeling the system including a parametric mass model with a tidally truncated pseudo-Jaffe density profile; in that case the substructure mass is M_sub=(3.51+-0.15)x10^9 Msun, located at (-0.651+-0.038,1.040+-0.034)'', precisely where also the surface density map shows a strong convergence peak. [...] We set a lower limit of (M/L)_V}>=120 (Msun/L}_V,sun (3-sigma) inside a sphere of 0.3 kpc centred on the substructure (r_tidal=1.1kpc). The result is robust under substantial changes in the model and the data-set (e.g. PSF, pixel number and scale, source and potential regularization, rotations and galaxy subtraction). Despite being at the limits of detectability, it can therefore not be attributed to obvious systematic effects. Our detection implies a dark matter mass fraction at the radius of the inner Einstein ring of f_CDM=2.15^{+2.05}_{-1.25} percent (68 percent C.L) in the mass range 4x10^6 Msun to 4x10^9 Msun assuming alpha=1.9+-0.1 (with dN/dm ~ m^-alpha). Assuming a flat prior on alpha, between 1.0 and 3.0, increases this to f_CDM=2.56^{+3.26}_{-1.50} percent (68 percent C.L). The likelihood ratio is 0.51 between our best value (f_CDM=0.0215) and that from simulations (f_sim=0.003). Hence the inferred mass fraction, admittedly based on a single lens system, is large but still consistent with predictions. [...]