• In environmental applications of extreme value statistics, the underlying stochastic process is often modeled either as a max-stable process in continuous time/space or as a process in the domain of attraction of such a max-stable process. In practice, however, the processes are typically only observed at discrete points and one has to resort to interpolation to fill in the gaps. We discuss the influence of such an interpolation on estimators of marginal parameters as well as estimators of the exponent measure. In particular, natural conditions on the fineness of the observational scheme are developed which ensure that asymptotically the interpolated estimators behave in the same way as the estimators which use fully observed continuous processes.
  • A new approach for evaluating time-trends in extreme values accounting also for spatial dependence is proposed. Based on exceedances over a space-time threshold, estimators for a trend function and for extreme value parameters are given, leading to a homogenization procedure for then applying stationary extreme value processes. Extremal dependence over space is further evaluated through variogram analysis including anisotropy. We detect significant inhomogeneities and trends in the extremal behaviour of daily precipitation data over a time period of 84 years and from 68 observational weather stations in North-West Germany. We observe that the trend is not monotonous over time in general. Asymptotic normality of the estimators under maximum domain of attraction conditions are proven.
  • In risk management, often the probability must be estimated that a random vector falls into an extreme failure set. In the framework of bivariate extreme value theory, we construct an estimator for such failure probabilities and analyze its asymptotic properties under natural conditions. It turns out that the estimation error is mainly determined by the accuracy of the statistical analysis of the marginal distributions if the extreme value approximation to the dependence structure is at least as accurate as the generalized Pareto approximation to the marginal distributions. Moreover, we establish confidence intervals and briefly discuss generalizations to higher dimensions and issues arising in practical applications as well.
  • The estimation of the extremal dependence structure is spoiled by the impact of the bias, which increases with the number of observations used for the estimation. Already known in the univariate setting, the bias correction procedure is studied in this paper under the multivariate framework. New families of estimators of the stable tail dependence function are obtained. They are asymptotically unbiased versions of the empirical estimator introduced by Huang [Statistics of bivariate extremes (1992) Erasmus Univ.]. Since the new estimators have a regular behavior with respect to the number of observations, it is possible to deduce aggregated versions so that the choice of the threshold is substantially simplified. An extensive simulation study is provided as well as an application on real data.
  • In extreme value theory, there are two fundamental approaches, both widely used: the block maxima (BM) method and the peaks-over-threshold (POT) method. Whereas much theoretical research has gone into the POT method, the BM method has not been studied thoroughly. The present paper aims at providing conditions under which the BM method can be justified. We also provide a theoretical comparative study of the methods, which is in general consistent with the vast literature on comparing the methods all based on simulated data and fully parametric models. The results indicate that the BM method is a rather efficient method under usual practical conditions. In this paper, we restrict attention to the i.i.d. case and focus on the probability weighted moment (PWM) estimators of Hosking, Wallis and Wood [Technometrics (1985) 27 251-261].
  • In extreme value statistics, the peaks-over-threshold method is widely used. The method is based on the generalized Pareto distribution characterizing probabilities of exceedances over high thresholds in $\mathbb {R}^d$. We present a generalization of this concept in the space of continuous functions. We call this the generalized Pareto process. Differently from earlier papers, our definition is not based on a distribution function but on functional properties, and does not need a reference to a related max-stable process. As an application, we use the theory to simulate wind fields connected to disastrous storms on the basis of observed extreme but not disastrous storms. We also establish the peaks-over-threshold approach in function space.
  • The climate change dispute is about changes over time of environmental characteristics (such as rainfall). Some people say that a possible change is not so much in the mean but rather in the extreme phenomena (that is, the average rainfall may not change much but heavy storms may become more or less frequent). The paper studies changes over time in the probability that some high threshold is exceeded. The model is such that the threshold does not need to be specified, the results hold for any high threshold. For simplicity a certain linear trend is studied depending on one real parameter. Estimation and testing procedures (is there a trend?) are developed. Simulation results are presented. The method is applied to trends in heavy rainfall at 18 gauging stations across Germany and The Netherlands. A tentative conclusion is that the trend seems to depend on whether or not a station is close to the sea.
  • When considering d possibly dependent random variables, one is often interested in extreme risk regions, with very small probability p. We consider risk regions of the form ${\mathbf{z}\in\mathbb{R}^d:f(\mathbf{z})\leq\beta}$, where f is the joint density and $\beta$ a small number. Estimation of such an extreme risk region is difficult since it contains hardly any or no data. Using extreme value theory, we construct a natural estimator of an extreme risk region and prove a refined form of consistency, given a random sample of multivariate regularly varying random vectors. In a detailed simulation and comparison study, the good performance of the procedure is demonstrated. We also apply our estimator to financial data.
  • Let $W_i,i\in{\mathbb{N}}$, be independent copies of a zero-mean Gaussian process $\{W(t),t\in{\mathbb{R}}^d\}$ with stationary increments and variance $\sigma^2(t)$. Independently of $W_i$, let $\sum_{i=1}^{\infty}\delta_{U_i}$ be a Poisson point process on the real line with intensity $e^{-y} dy$. We show that the law of the random family of functions $\{V_i(\cdot),i\in{\mathbb{N}}\}$, where $V_i(t)=U_i+W_i(t)-\sigma^2(t)/2$, is translation invariant. In particular, the process $\eta(t)=\bigvee_{i=1}^{\infty}V_i(t)$ is a stationary max-stable process with standard Gumbel margins. The process $\eta$ arises as a limit of a suitably normalized and rescaled pointwise maximum of $n$ i.i.d. stationary Gaussian processes as $n\to\infty$ if and only if $W$ is a (nonisotropic) fractional Brownian motion on ${\mathbb{R}}^d$. Under suitable conditions on $W$, the process $\eta$ has a mixed moving maxima representation.
  • Consider $n$ i.i.d. random vectors on $\mathbb{R}^2$, with unknown, common distribution function $F$. Under a sharpening of the extreme value condition on $F$, we derive a weighted approximation of the corresponding tail copula process. Then we construct a test to check whether the extreme value condition holds by comparing two estimators of the limiting extreme value distribution, one obtained from the tail copula process and the other obtained by first estimating the spectral measure which is then used as a building block for the limiting extreme value distribution. We derive the limiting distribution of the test statistic from the aforementioned weighted approximation. This limiting distribution contains unknown functional parameters. Therefore, we show that a version with estimated parameters converges weakly to the true limiting distribution. Based on this result, the finite sample properties of our testing procedure are investigated through a simulation study. A real data application is also presented.
  • The aim of this paper is to provide models for spatial extremes in the case of stationarity. The spatial dependence at extreme levels of a stationary process is modeled using an extension of the theory of max-stable processes of de Haan and Pickands [Probab. Theory Related Fields 72 (1986) 477--492]. We propose three one-dimensional and three two-dimensional models. These models depend on just one parameter or a few parameters that measure the strength of tail dependence as a function of the distance between locations. We also propose two estimators for this parameter and prove consistency under domain of attraction conditions and asymptotic normality under appropriate extra conditions.
  • We prove asymptotic normality of the so-called maximum likelihood estimator of the extreme value index.