• Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have gained tremendous success in solving complex inverse problems for both problems involving independent datasets from input-output pairs of static objects, as well as sequential datasets from dynamic objects. In order to learn the underlying temporal statistics, a video sequence is typically used at the cost of network complexity and computation. The aim of this work is to develop a novel CNN framework to reconstruct video sequence of dynamic live cells captured using a computational microscopy technique, Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM). The unique feature of the FPM is its capability to reconstruct images with both wide field-of-view (FOV) and high resolution, i.e. a large space-bandwidth-product (SBP), by taking a series of low resolution intensity images. For live cell imaging, a single FPM frame contains thousands of cell samples with different morphological features. Our idea is to fully exploit the statistical information provided by this large spatial ensembles so as to learn temporal information in a sequential measurement, without using any additional temporal dataset. Specifically, we show that it is possible to reconstruct high-SBP dynamic cell videos by a CNN trained only on the first FPM dataset captured at the beginning of a time-series experiment. Our CNN approach reconstructs a 12800x10800 pixels phase image using only ~25 seconds, a 50x speedup compared to the model-based FPM algorithm. In addition, the CNN further reduces the required number of images in each time frame by ~6x. Overall, this significantly improves the imaging throughput by reducing both the acquisition and computational times. Our technique demonstrates a promising deep learning approach to continuously monitor large live-cell populations over an extended time and gather useful spatial and temporal information with sub-cellular resolution.
  • We demonstrate a motion-free intensity diffraction tomography technique that enables direct inversion of 3D phase and absorption from intensity-only measurements for weakly scattering samples. We derive a novel linear forward model, featuring slice-wise phase and absorption transfer functions using angled illumination. This new framework facilitates flexible and efficient data acquisition, enabling arbitrary sampling of the illumination angles. The reconstruction algorithm performs 3D synthetic aperture using a robust, computation and memory efficient slice-wise deconvolution to achieve resolution up to the incoherent limit. We demonstrate our technique with thick biological samples having both sparse 3D structures and dense cell clusters. We further investigate the limitation of our technique when imaging strongly scattering samples. Imaging performance and the influence of multiple scattering is evaluated using a 3D sample consisting of stacked phase and absorption resolution targets. This computational microscopy system is directly built on a standard commercial microscope with a simple LED array source add-on, and promises broad applications by leveraging the ubiquitous microscopy platforms with minimal hardware modifications.
  • PCANet, as one noticeable shallow network, employs the histogram representation for feature pooling. However, there are three main problems about this kind of pooling method. First, the histogram-based pooling method binarizes the feature maps and leads to inevitable discriminative information loss. Second, it is difficult to effectively combine other visual cues into a compact representation, because the simple concatenation of various visual cues leads to feature representation inefficiency. Third, the dimensionality of histogram-based output grows exponentially with the number of feature maps used. In order to overcome these problems, we propose a novel shallow network model, named as PCANet-II. Compared with the histogram-based output, the second order pooling not only provides more discriminative information by preserving both the magnitude and sign of convolutional responses, but also dramatically reduces the size of output features. Thus we combine the second order statistical pooling method with the shallow network, i.e., PCANet. Moreover, it is easy to combine other discriminative and robust cues by using the second order pooling. So we introduce the binary feature difference encoding scheme into our PCANet-II to further improve robustness. Experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our proposed PCANet-II method.
  • Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) improves resolution by down-modulating high-frequency information of an object to fit within the passband of the optical system. Generally, the reconstruction process requires prior knowledge of the illumination patterns, which implies a well-calibrated and aberration-free system. Here, we propose a new \textit{algorithmic self-calibration} strategy for SIM that does not need to know the exact patterns {\it a priori}, but only their covariance. The algorithm, termed PE-SIMS, includes a Pattern-Estimation (PE) step requiring the uniformity of the sum of the illumination patterns and a SIM reconstruction procedure using a Statistical prior (SIMS). Additionally, we perform a pixel reassignment process (SIMS-PR) to enhance the reconstruction quality. We achieve 2$\times$ better resolution than a conventional widefield microscope, while remaining insensitive to aberration-induced pattern distortion and robust against parameter tuning.
  • Compressed sensing has been discussed separately in spatial and temporal domains. Compressive holography has been introduced as a method that allows 3D tomographic reconstruction at different depths from a single 2D image. Coded exposure is a temporal compressed sensing method for high speed video acquisition. In this work, we combine compressive holography and coded exposure techniques and extend the discussion to 4D reconstruction in space and time from one coded captured image. In our prototype, digital in-line holography was used for imaging macroscopic, fast moving objects. The pixel-wise temporal modulation was implemented by a digital micromirror device. In this paper we demonstrate $10\times$ temporal super resolution with multiple depths recovery from a single image. Two examples are presented for the purpose of recording subtle vibrations and tracking small particles within 5 ms.
  • Future mobile communications systems are likely to be very different to those of today with new service innovations driven by increasing data traffic demand, increasing processing power of smart devices and new innovative applications. To meet these service demands the telecommunications industry is converging on a common set of 5G requirements which includes network speeds as high as 10 Gbps, cell edge rate greater than 100 Mbps, and latency of less than 1 msec. To reach these 5G requirements the industry is looking at new spectrum bands in the range up to 100 GHz where there is spectrum availability for wide bandwidth channels. For the development of new 5G systems to operate in bands up to 100 GHz there is a need for accurate radio propagation models which are not addressed by existing channel models developed for bands below 6 GHz. This paper presents a preliminary overview of the 5G channel models for bands up to 100 GHz in indoor offices and shopping malls, derived from extensive measurements across a multitude of bands. These studies have found some extensibility of the existing 3GPP models to the higher frequency bands up to 100 GHz. The measurements indicate that the smaller wavelengths introduce an increased sensitivity of the propagation models to the scale of the environment and show some frequency dependence of the path loss as well as increased occurrence of blockage. Further, the penetration loss is highly dependent on the material and tends to increase with frequency. The small-scale characteristics of the channel such as delay spread and angular spread and the multipath richness is somewhat similar over the frequency range, which is encouraging for extending the existing 3GPP models to the wider frequency range. Further work will be carried out to complete these models, but this paper presents the first steps for an initial basis for the model development.
  • For the development of new 5G systems to operate in bands up to 100 GHz, there is a need for accurate radio propagation models at these bands that currently are not addressed by existing channel models developed for bands below 6 GHz. This document presents a preliminary overview of 5G channel models for bands up to 100 GHz. These have been derived based on extensive measurement and ray tracing results across a multitude of frequencies from 6 GHz to 100 GHz, and this document describes an initial 3D channel model which includes: 1) typical deployment scenarios for urban microcells (UMi) and urban macrocells (UMa), and 2) a baseline model for incorporating path loss, shadow fading, line of sight probability, penetration and blockage models for the typical scenarios. Various processing methodologies such as clustering and antenna decoupling algorithms are also presented.
  • Fourier ptychography is a new computational microscopy technique that provides gigapixel-scale intensity and phase images with both wide field-of-view and high resolution. By capturing a stack of low-resolution images under different illumination angles, a nonlinear inverse algorithm can be used to computationally reconstruct the high-resolution complex field. Here, we compare and classify multiple proposed inverse algorithms in terms of experimental robustness. We find that the main sources of error are noise, aberrations and mis-calibration (i.e. model mis-match). Using simulations and experiments, we demonstrate that the choice of cost function plays a critical role, with amplitude-based cost functions performing better than intensity-based ones. The reason for this is that Fourier ptychography datasets consist of images from both brightfield and darkfield illumination, representing a large range of measured intensities. Both noise (e.g. Poisson noise) and model mis-match errors are shown to scale with intensity. Hence, algorithms that use an appropriate cost function will be more tolerant to both noise and model mis-match. Given these insights, we propose a global Newton's method algorithm which is robust and computationally efficient. Finally, we discuss the impact of procedures for algorithmic correction of aberrations and mis-calibration.
  • We demonstrate a new computational illumination technique that achieves large space-bandwidth-time product, for quantitative phase imaging of unstained live samples in vitro. Microscope lenses can have either large field of view (FOV) or high resolution, not both. Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is a new computational imaging technique that circumvents this limit by fusing information from multiple images taken with different illumination angles. The result is a gigapixel-scale image having both wide FOV and high resolution, i.e. large space-bandwidth product (SBP). FPM has enormous potential for revolutionizing microscopy and has already found application in digital pathology. However, it suffers from long acquisition times (on the order of minutes), limiting throughput. Faster capture times would not only improve imaging speed, but also allow studies of live samples, where motion artifacts degrade results. In contrast to fixed (e.g. pathology) slides, live samples are continuously evolving at various spatial and temporal scales. Here, we present a new source coding scheme, along with real-time hardware control, to achieve 0.8 NA resolution across a 4x FOV with sub-second capture times. We propose an improved algorithm and new initialization scheme, which allow robust phase reconstruction over long time-lapse experiments. We present the first FPM results for both growing and confluent in vitro cell cultures, capturing videos of subcellular dynamical phenomena in popular cell lines undergoing division and migration. Our method opens up FPM to applications with live samples, for observing rare events in both space and time.
  • We use Hamiltonian ray tracing and phase-space representation to describe the propagation of a single spatial soliton and soliton collisions in a Kerr nonlinear medium. Hamiltonian ray tracing is applied using the iterative nonlinear beam propagation method, which allows taking both wave effects and Kerr nonlinearity into consideration. Energy evolution within a single spatial soliton and the exchange of energy when two solitons collide are interpreted intuitively by ray trajectories and geometrical shearing of the Wigner distribution functions.
  • We develop and implement a compressive reconstruction method for tomographic recovery of refractive index distribution for weakly attenuating objects in a microfocus X-ray system. This is achieved through the development of a discretized operator modeling both the transport of intensity equation and X-ray transform that is suitable for iterative reconstruction techniques.
  • Phase space tomography estimates correlation functions entirely from snapshots in the evolution of the wave function along a time or space variable. In contrast, traditional interferometric methods require measurement of multiple two-point correlations. However, as in every tomographic formulation, undersampling poses a severe limitation. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, experimental demonstration of compressive reconstruction of the classical optical correlation function, i.e. the mutual intensity function. Our compressive algorithm makes explicit use of the physically justifiable assumption of a low-entropy source (or state.) Since the source was directly accessible in our classical experiment, we were able to compare the compressive estimate of the mutual intensity to an independent ground-truth estimate from the van Cittert-Zernike theorem and verify substantial quantitative improvements in the reconstruction.