• The cores of clusters at 0 $\lesssim$ z $\lesssim$ 1 are dominated by quiescent early-type galaxies, whereas the field is dominated by star-forming late-type ones. Galaxy properties, notably the star formation (SF) ability, are altered as they fall into overdense regions. The critical issues to understand this evolution are how the truncation of SF is connected to the morphological transformation and the responsible physical mechanism. The GaLAxy Cluster Evolution Survey (GLACE) is conducting a study on the variation of galaxy properties (SF, AGN, morphology) as a function of environment in a representative sample of clusters. A deep survey of emission line galaxies (ELG) is being performed, mapping a set of optical lines ([OII], [OIII], H$\beta$ and H$\alpha$/[NII]) in several clusters at z $\sim$ 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86. Using the Tunable Filters (TF) of OSIRIS/GTC, GLACE applies the technique of TF tomography: for each line, a set of images at different wavelengths are taken through the TF, to cover a rest frame velocity range of several thousands km/s. The first GLACE results target the H$\alpha$/[NII] lines in the cluster ZwCl 0024.0+1652 at z = 0.395 covering $\sim$ 2 $\times$ r$_{vir}$. We discuss the techniques devised to process the TF tomography observations to generate the catalogue of H$\alpha$ emitters of 174 unique cluster sources down to a SFR below 1 M$_{\odot}$/yr. The AGN population is discriminated using different diagnostics and found to be $\sim$ 37% of the ELG population. The median SFR is 1.4 M$_{\odot}$/yr. We have studied the spatial distribution of ELG, confirming the existence of two components in the redshift space. Finally, we have exploited the outstanding spectral resolution of the TF to estimate the cluster mass from ELG dynamics, finding M$_{200}$ = 4.1 $\times$ 10$^{14}$ M$_{\odot} h^{-1}$, in agreement with previous weak-lensing estimates.
  • We examine far-infrared and submillimeter spectral energy distributions for galaxies in the Infrared Space Observatory Atlas of Bright Spiral Galaxies. For the 71 galaxies where we had complete 60-180 micron data, we fit blackbodies with lambda^-1 emissivities and average temperatures of 31 K or lambda^-2 emissivities and average temperatures of 22 K. Except for high temperatures determined in some early-type galaxies, the temperatures show no dependence on any galaxy characteristic. For the 60-850 micron range in eight galaxies, we fit blackbodies with lambda^-1, lambda-2, and lambda^-beta (with beta variable) emissivities to the data. The best results were with the lambda^-beta emissivities, where the temperatures were ~30 K and the emissivity coefficient beta ranged from 0.9 to 1.9. These results produced gas to dust ratios that ranged from 150 to 580, which were consistent with the ratio for the Milky Way and which exhibited relatively little dispersion compared to fits with fixed emissivities.
  • We investigate star formation along the Hubble sequence using the ISO Atlas of Spiral Galaxies. Using mid-infrared and far-infrared flux densities normalized by K-band flux densities as indicators of recent star formation, we find several trends. First, star formation activity is stronger in late-type (Sc - Scd) spirals than in early-type (Sa - Sab) spirals. This trend is seen both in nuclear and disk activity. These results confirm several previous optical studies of star formation along the Hubble sequence but conflict with the conclusions of most of the previous studies using IRAS data, and we discuss why this might be so. Second, star formation is significantly more extended in later-type spirals than in early-type spirals. We suggest that these trends in star formation are a result of differences in the gas content and its distribution along the Hubble sequence, and it is these differences that promote star formation in late-type spiral galaxies. We also search for trends in nuclear star formation related to the presence of a bar or nuclear activity. The nuclear star formation activity is not significantly different between barred and unbarred galaxies. We do find that star formation activity appears to be inhibited in LINERs and transition objects compared to HII galaxies. The mean star formation rate in the sample is 1.4 Msun/yr based on global far-infrared fluxes. Combining these data with CO data gives a mean gas consumption time of 6.4 x 10^8 yr, which is ~5 times lower than the values found in other studies. Finally, we find excellent support for the Schmidt Law in the correlation between molecular gas masses and recent star formation in this sample of spiral galaxies.
  • We present deep diffraction-limited far-infrared (FIR) strip maps of a sample of 63 galaxies later than S0 and brighter than B_T 16.8, selected from the Virgo Cluster Catalogue of Binggeli, Sandage & Tammann. The ISOPHOT instrument on board the Infrared Space Observatory was used to achieve sensitivities typically an order of magnitude deeper than IRAS in the 60 and 100 micron bands and to reach the confusion limit at 170 microns. The averaged 3 sigma upper limits for integrated flux densities of point sources at 60, 100 and 170 microns are 43, 33 and 58 mJy, respectively. 54 galaxies (85.7 percent) are detected at least at one wavelength, and 40 galaxies (63.5 percent) are detected at all three wavelengths. The highest detection rate (85.7 percent) is in the 170 micron band. In many cases the galaxies are resolved, allowing the scale length of the infrared disks to be derived from the oversampled brightness profiles in addition to the spatially integrated emission. The data presented should provide the basis for a variety of statistical investigations of the FIR spectral energy distributions of gas rich galaxies in the local universe spanning a broad range in star-formation activity and morphological types, including dwarf systems and galaxies with rather quiescent star formation activity.
  • We present the first results of mid-infrared (MIR) ultra-deep observations towards the lensing cluster Abell 2390 using the ISOCAM infrared camera on-board ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite. They reveal a large number of luminous MIR sources. Optical and near-infrared (NIR) cross-identification suggests that almost all 15 microns sources and about half of the 7 microns are identified with distant lensed galaxies. Thanks to the gravitational amplification these sources constitute the faintest MIR sources detected. We confirm that the number counts derived at 15 microns show a clear excess of sources with respect to the predictions of a no-evolution model. The possible extension of the NGST instrumentation from the near-IR (1-5 microns) to the thermal infrared, up to 20 microns (as suggested by the NGST task group report, October 1997) would permit study of this new population of dust-enshrouded AGN/starburst galaxies detected by ISOCAM, up to very high redshifts and with vastly improved spatial resolution. The existence of this population demonstrats that the discrimination of dust contributions, possible in the MIR, must be an important consideration in reaching an understanding of the Universe at high redshift. Therefore we stress that the access of NGST to the thermal infrared would increase tremendously its scientific potential to study the early universe.