• Neural Style Transfer has shown very exciting results enabling new forms of image manipulation. Here we extend the existing method to introduce control over spatial location, colour information and across spatial scale. We demonstrate how this enhances the method by allowing high-resolution controlled stylisation and helps to alleviate common failure cases such as applying ground textures to sky regions. Furthermore, by decomposing style into these perceptual factors we enable the combination of style information from multiple sources to generate new, perceptually appealing styles from existing ones. We also describe how these methods can be used to more efficiently produce large size, high-quality stylisation. Finally we show how the introduced control measures can be applied in recent methods for Fast Neural Style Transfer.
  • Here we present a parametric model for dynamic textures. The model is based on spatiotemporal summary statistics computed from the feature representations of a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) trained on object recognition. We demonstrate how the model can be used to synthesise new samples of dynamic textures and to predict motion in simple movies.
  • This note presents an extension to the neural artistic style transfer algorithm (Gatys et al.). The original algorithm transforms an image to have the style of another given image. For example, a photograph can be transformed to have the style of a famous painting. Here we address a potential shortcoming of the original method: the algorithm transfers the colors of the original painting, which can alter the appearance of the scene in undesirable ways. We describe simple linear methods for transferring style while preserving colors.
  • Here we demonstrate that the feature space of random shallow convolutional neural networks (CNNs) can serve as a surprisingly good model of natural textures. Patches from the same texture are consistently classified as being more similar then patches from different textures. Samples synthesized from the model capture spatial correlations on scales much larger then the receptive field size, and sometimes even rival or surpass the perceptual quality of state of the art texture models (but show less variability). The current state of the art in parametric texture synthesis relies on the multi-layer feature space of deep CNNs that were trained on natural images. Our finding suggests that such optimized multi-layer feature spaces are not imperative for texture modeling. Instead, much simpler shallow and convolutional networks can serve as the basis for novel texture synthesis algorithms.
  • Here we introduce a new model of natural textures based on the feature spaces of convolutional neural networks optimised for object recognition. Samples from the model are of high perceptual quality demonstrating the generative power of neural networks trained in a purely discriminative fashion. Within the model, textures are represented by the correlations between feature maps in several layers of the network. We show that across layers the texture representations increasingly capture the statistical properties of natural images while making object information more and more explicit. The model provides a new tool to generate stimuli for neuroscience and might offer insights into the deep representations learned by convolutional neural networks.
  • In fine art, especially painting, humans have mastered the skill to create unique visual experiences through composing a complex interplay between the content and style of an image. Thus far the algorithmic basis of this process is unknown and there exists no artificial system with similar capabilities. However, in other key areas of visual perception such as object and face recognition near-human performance was recently demonstrated by a class of biologically inspired vision models called Deep Neural Networks. Here we introduce an artificial system based on a Deep Neural Network that creates artistic images of high perceptual quality. The system uses neural representations to separate and recombine content and style of arbitrary images, providing a neural algorithm for the creation of artistic images. Moreover, in light of the striking similarities between performance-optimised artificial neural networks and biological vision, our work offers a path forward to an algorithmic understanding of how humans create and perceive artistic imagery.