• Context. Transition disks (TDs) are circumstellar disks with inner regions highly depleted in dust. TDs are observed in a small fraction of disk-bearing objects at ages of 1-10 Myr. They are important laboratories to study evolutionary effects in disks, from photoevaporation to planet-disk interactions. Aims. We report the discovery of a large inner dust-empty region in the disk around the very low mass star CIDA 1 (M$_{\star} \sim 0.1-0.2$ M$_{\odot}$). Methods. We used ALMA continuum observations at 887$\mu$m, which provide a spatial resolution of $0.''21\times0.''12$ ($\sim$15$\times$8 au in radius at 140 pc). Results. The data show a dusty ring with a clear cavity of radius $\sim$20 au, the typical characteristic of a TD. The emission in the ring is well described by a narrow Gaussian profile. The dust mass in the disk is $\sim$17 M$_{\oplus}$. CIDA 1 is one of the lowest mass stars with a clearly detected millimeter cavity. When compared to objects of similar stellar mass, it has a relatively massive dusty disk (less than $\sim5$% of Taurus Class II disks in Taurus have a ratio of $M_{\rm{disk}}/M_{\star}$ larger than CIDA 1) and a very high mass accretion rate (CIDA 1 is a disk with one of the lowest values of $M_{\rm{disk}}/\dot M$ ever observed). In light of these unusual parameters, we discuss a number of possible mechanisms that can be responsible for the formation of the dust cavity (e.g., photoevaporation, dead zones, embedded planets, close binary). We find that an embedded planet of a Saturn mass or a close binary are the most likely possibilities.
  • In recent ALMA surveys, the gas distributions and velocity structures of most of the protoplanetary disks can still not be imaged at high S/N due to the short integration time. In this work, we re-analyzed the ALMA 13CO (3-2) and C18O (3-2) data of 88 young stellar objects in Lupus with the velocity-aligned stacking method to enhance S/N and to study the kinematics and disk properties traced by molecular lines. This method aligns spectra at different positions in a disk based on the projected Keplerian velocities at their positions and then stacks them. This method enhances the S/N ratios of molecular-line data and allows us to obtain better detections and to constrain dynamical stellar masses and disk orientations. We obtain 13CO detections in 41 disks and C18O detections in 18 disks with 11 new detections in 13CO and 9 new detections in C18O after applying the method. We estimate the disk orientations and the dynamical stellar masses from the 13CO data. Our estimated dynamical stellar masses correlate with the spectroscopic stellar masses, and in a subsample of 16 sources, where the inclination angles are better constrained, the two masses are in a good agreement within the uncertainties and with a mean difference of 0.15 Msun. With more detections of fainter disks, our results show that high gas masses derived from the 13CO and C18O lines tend to be associated with high dust masses estimated from the continuum emission. Nevertheless, the scatter is large (0.9 dex), implying large uncertainties in deriving the disk gas mass from the line fluxes. We find that with such large uncertainties it is expected that there is no correlation between the disk gas mass and the mass accretion rate with the current data. Deeper observations to detect disks with gas masses <1E-5 Msun in molecular lines are needed to investigate the correlation between the disk gas mass and the mass accretion rate.
  • We present GALARIO, a computational library that exploits the power of modern graphical processing units (GPUs) to accelerate the analysis of observations from radio interferometers like ALMA or the VLA. GALARIO speeds up the computation of synthetic visibilities from a generic 2D model image or a radial brightness profile (for axisymmetric sources). On a GPU, GALARIO is 150 faster than standard Python and 10 times faster than serial C++ code on a CPU. Highly modular, easy to use and to adopt in existing code, GALARIO comes as two compiled libraries, one for Nvidia GPUs and one for multicore CPUs, where both have the same functions with identical interfaces. GALARIO comes with Python bindings but can also be directly used in C or C++. The versatility and the speed of GALARIO open new analysis pathways that otherwise would be prohibitively time consuming, e.g. fitting high resolution observations of large number of objects, or entire spectral cubes of molecular gas emission. It is a general tool that can be applied to any field that uses radio interferometer observations. The source code is available online at https://github.com/mtazzari/galario under the open source GNU Lesser General Public License v3.
  • Towards the pre-stellar core L1544, the methanol (CH$_3$OH) emission forms an asymmetric ring around the core centre, where CH$_3$OH is mostly in solid form, with a clear peak 4000~au to the north-east of the dust continuum peak. As part of the NOEMA Large Project SOLIS (Seeds of Life in Space), the CH$_3$OH peak has been spatially resolved to study its kinematics and physical structure and to investigate the cause behind the local enhancement. We find that methanol emission is distributed in a ridge parallel to the main axis of the dense core. The centroid velocity increases by about 0.2~km~s$^{-1}$ and the velocity dispersion increases from subsonic to transonic towards the central zone of the core, where the velocity field also shows complex structure. This could be indication of gentle accretion of material onto the core or interaction of two filaments, producing a slow shock. We measure the rotational temperature and show that methanol is in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) only close to the dust peak, where it is significantly depleted. The CH$_3$OH column density, $N_{tot}({\rm CH_3OH})$, profile has been derived with non-LTE radiative transfer modelling and compared with chemical models of a static core. The measured $N_{tot}({\rm CH_3OH})$ profile is consistent with model predictions, but the total column densities are one order of magnitude lower than those predicted by models, suggesting that the efficiency of reactive desorption or atomic hydrogen tunnelling adopted in the model may be overestimated; or that an evolutionary model is needed to better reproduce methanol abundance.
  • Transition disks with large dust cavities around young stars are promising targets for studying planet formation. Previous studies have revealed the presence of gas cavities inside the dust cavities hinting at recently formed, giant planets. However, many of these studies are biased towards the brightest disks in the nearby star forming regions, and it is not possible to derive reliable statistics that can be compared with exoplanet populations. We present the analysis of 11 transition disks with large cavities (>20 AU radius) from a complete disk survey of the Lupus star forming region, using ALMA Band 7 observations at 0.3" (22-30 AU radius) resolution of the 345 GHz continuum, 13CO and C18O 3-2 observations and the Spectral Energy Distribution of each source. Gas and dust surface density profiles are derived using the physical-chemical modeling code DALI. This is the first study of transition disks of large cavities within a complete disk survey within a star forming region. The dust cavity sizes range from 20-90 AU radius and in three cases, a gas cavity is resolved as well. The deep drops in gas density and large dust cavity sizes are consistent with clearing by giant planets. The fraction of transition disks with large cavities in Lupus is ~11%, which is inconsistent with exoplanet population studies of giant planets at wide orbits. Furthermore, we present a hypothesis of an evolutionary path for large massive disks evolving into transition disks with large cavities.
  • We make the first data release (DR1) of the ongoing ESO Public Survey SAMPLING (http://dx.doi.org/10.7910/DVN/0L8NHX). DR1 comprises of 124 fields distributed in $70^\circ < l < 216^\circ$, $-35^\circ < b < 25^\circ$. The 12CO and 13CO (2-1) cubes are gridded in $8"$ pixels, with an effective resolution of $36"$. The channel width is 0.33 km/s and the RMS noise is $T_{\rm mb}<0.2$ K. Once completed, SAMPLING and complementary surveys will initiate the first major step forward to characterize molecular clouds and star formation on truly Galactic scales.
  • We present ALMA observations of the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 in combination with previous SMA CO observations to probe the molecular environments of natal super star clusters. These observations include the HCO$^+$(1-0), HCN(1-0), HNC(1-0), and CCH(1-0) molecular lines, as well as 88 GHz continuum with a spatial resolution of $1''.7\times 1''.6$. After correcting for the contribution from free-free emission to the 88 GHz continuum flux density ($\sim$ 60% of the 88 GHz emission), we derive a total gas mass for He~2-10 of $M_{gas} = 4-6\times10^8$ M$_{\odot}$, roughly 5-20% of the dynamical mass. Based on a principle component analysis, HCO$^+$ is found to be the best "general" tracer of molecular emission. The line widths and luminosities of the CO emission suggests that the molecular clouds could either be as small as $\sim 8$ pc, or alternately have enhanced line widths. The CO emission and 88 GHz continuum are anti-correlated, suggesting that either the dust and molecular gas are not cospatial, which could reflect the 88 GHz continuum is dominated by free-free emission. The CO and CCH emission are also relatively anti-correlated, which is consistent with the CCH being photo-enhanced, and/or the CO being dissociated in the regions near the natal super star clusters. The molecular line ratios of regions containing the natal star clusters are different from the line ratios observed for regions elsewhere in the galaxy. In particular, the regions with thermal radio emission all have CO(2-1)/HCO$^+(1-0) < 16$, and the HCO$^+$/CO ratio appears to be correlated with the evolutionary stage of the clusters.
  • Young stellar objects (YSOs) may undergo periods of active accretion (outbursts), during which the protostellar accretion rate is temporarily enhanced by a few orders of magnitude. Whether or not these accretion outburst YSOs possess similar dust/gas reservoirs to each other, and whether or not their dust/gas reservoirs are similar as quiescent YSOs, are issues not yet clarified. The aim of this work is to characterize the millimeter thermal dust emission properties of a statistically significant sample of long and short duration accretion outburst YSOs (i.e., FUors and EXors) and the spectroscopically identified candidates of accretion outbursting YSOs (i.e., FUor-like objects). We have carried out extensive Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations mostly at $\sim$225 GHz (1.33 mm) and $\sim$272 GHz (1.10 mm), from 2008 to 2017. We covered accretion outburst YSOs located at $<$1 kpc distances from the solar system. We analyze all the existing SMA data of such objects, both published and unpublished, in a coherent way to present a millimeter interferometric database of 29 objects. We obtained 21 detections at $>$3-$\sigma$ significance. Detected sources except for the two cases of V883 Ori and NGC 2071 MM3 were observed with $\sim$1$"$ angular resolution. Overall our observed targets show a systematically higher millimeter luminosity distribution than those of the $M_{*}>$0.3 $M_{\odot}$ Class II YSOs in the nearby ($\lesssim$400 pc) low-mass star-forming molecular clouds (e.g., Taurus, Lupus, Upp Scorpio, and Chameleon I). In addition, at 1 mm our observed confirmed binaries or triple-system sources are systematically fainter than the rest of the sources even though their 1 mm fluxes are broadly distributed. We may have detected $\sim$30-60\% millimeter flux variability from V2494 Cyg and V2495 Cyg, from the observations separated by $\sim$1 year.
  • We investigate the relation between disk mass and mass accretion rate to constrain the mechanism of angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks. Dust mass and mass accretion rate in Chamaeleon I are correlated with a slope close to linear, similar to the one recently identified in Lupus. We investigate the effect of stellar mass and find that the intrinsic scatter around the best-fit Mdust-Mstar and Macc-Mstar relations is uncorrelated. Disks with a constant alpha viscosity can fit the observed relations between dust mass, mass accretion rate, and stellar mass, but over-predict the strength of the correlation between disk mass and mass accretion rate when using standard initial conditions. We find two possible solutions. 1) The observed scatter in Mdust and Macc is not primoridal, but arises from additional physical processes or uncertainties in estimating the disk gas mass. Most likely grain growth and radial drift affect the observable dust mass, while variability on large time scales affects the mass accretion rates. 2) The observed scatter is primordial, but disks have not evolved substantially at the age of Lupus and Chamaeleon I due to a low viscosity or a large initial disk radius. More accurate estimates of the disk mass and gas disk sizes in a large sample of protoplanetary disks, either through direct observations of the gas or spatially resolved multi-wavelength observations of the dust with ALMA, are needed to discriminate between both scenarios or to constrain alternative angular momentum transport mechanisms such as MHD disk winds.
  • We conducted a detailed radiative transfer modeling of the dust emission from the circumstellar disk around HL Tau. The goal of our study is to derive the surface density profile of the inner disk and its structure. In addition to the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array images at Band 3 (2.9mm), Band 6 (1.3mm), and Band 7 (0.87mm), the most recent Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 7mm were included in the analysis. A simulated annealing algorithm was invoked to search for the optimum model. The radiative transfer analysis demonstrates that most radial components (i.e., >6AU) of the disk become optically thin at a wavelength of 7mm, which allows us to constrain, for the first time, the dust density distribution in the inner region of the disk. We found that a homogeneous grain size distribution is not sufficient to explain the observed images at different wavelengths simultaneously, while models with a shallower grain size distribution in the inner disk work well. We found clear evidence that larger grains are trapped in the first bright ring. Our results imply that dust evolution has already taken place in the disk at a relatively young (i.e., ~1Myr) age. We compared the midplane temperature distribution, optical depth, and properties of various dust rings with those reported previously. Using the Toomre parameter, we briefly discussed the gravitational instability as a potential mechanism for the origin of the dust clump detected in the first bright ring via the VLA observations.
  • The mass of a protoplanetary disk limits the formation and future growth of any planet. Masses of protoplanetary disks are usually calculated from measurements of the dust continuum emission by assuming an interstellar gas-to-dust ratio. To investigate the utility of CO as an alternate probe of disk mass, we use ALMA to survey $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O J = $3-2$ line emission from a sample of 93 protoplanetary disks around stars and brown dwarfs with masses from 0.03 -- 2 M$_{\odot}$ in the nearby Chamaeleon I star-forming region. We detect $^{13}$CO emission from 17 sources and C$^{18}$O from only one source. Gas masses for disks are then estimated by comparing the CO line luminosities to results from published disk models that include CO freeze-out and isotope-selective photodissociation. Under the assumption of a typical ISM CO-to-H$_2$ ratios of $10^{-4}$, the resulting gas masses are implausibly low, with an average gas mass of $\sim$ 0.05 M$_{Jup}$ as inferred from the average flux of stacked $^{13}$CO lines. The low gas masses and gas-to-dust ratios for Cha I disks are both consistent with similar results from disks in the Lupus star-forming region. The faint CO line emission may instead be explained if disks have much higher gas masses, but freeze-out of CO or complex C-bearing molecules is underestimated in disk models. The conversion of CO flux to CO gas mass also suffers from uncertainties in disk structures, which could affect gas temperatures. CO emission lines will only be a good tracer of the disk mass when models for C and CO depletion are confirmed to be accurate.
  • We present the first high-resolution sub-mm survey of both dust and gas for a large population of protoplanetary disks. Characterizing fundamental properties of protoplanetary disks on a statistical level is critical to understanding how disks evolve into the diverse exoplanet population. We use ALMA to survey 89 protoplanetary disks around stars with $M_{\ast}>0.1~M_{\odot}$ in the young (1--3~Myr), nearby (150--200~pc) Lupus complex. Our observations cover the 890~$\mu$m continuum and the $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O 3--2 lines. We use the sub-mm continuum to constrain $M_{\rm dust}$ to a few Martian masses (0.2--0.4~$M_{\oplus}$) and the CO isotopologue lines to constrain $M_{\rm gas}$ to roughly a Jupiter mass (assuming ISM-like $\rm {[CO]/[H_2]}$ abundance). Of 89 sources, we detect 62 in continuum, 36 in $^{13}$CO, and 11 in C$^{18}$O at $>3\sigma$ significance. Stacking individually undetected sources limits their average dust mass to $\lesssim6$ Lunar masses (0.03~$M_{\oplus}$), indicating rapid evolution once disk clearing begins. We find a positive correlation between $M_{\rm dust}$ and $M_{\ast}$, and present the first evidence for a positive correlation between $M_{\rm gas}$ and $M_{\ast}$, which may explain the dependence of giant planet frequency on host star mass. The mean dust mass in Lupus is 3$\times$ higher than in Upper Sco, while the dust mass distributions in Lupus and Taurus are statistically indistinguishable. Most detected disks have $M_{\rm gas}\lesssim1~M_{\rm Jup}$ and gas-to-dust ratios $<100$, assuming ISM-like $\rm {[CO]/[H_2]}$ abundance; unless CO is very depleted, the inferred gas depletion indicates that planet formation is well underway by a few Myr and may explain the unexpected prevalence of super-Earths in the exoplanet population.
  • The $\sigma$ Orionis cluster is important for studying protoplanetary disk evolution, as its intermediate age ($\sim$3-5 Myr) is comparable to the median disk lifetime. We use ALMA to conduct a high-sensitivity survey of dust and gas in 92 protoplanetary disks around $\sigma$ Orionis members with $M_{\ast}\gtrsim0.1 M_{\odot}$. Our observations cover the 1.33 mm continuum and several CO $J=2-1$ lines: out of 92 sources, we detect 37 in the mm continuum and six in $^{12}$CO, three in $^{13}$CO, and none in C$^{18}$O. Using the continuum emission to estimate dust mass, we find only 11 disks with $M_{\rm dust}\gtrsim10 M_{\oplus}$, indicating that after only a few Myr of evolution most disks lack sufficient dust to form giant planet cores. Stacking the individually undetected continuum sources limits their average dust mass to 5$\times$ lower than that of the faintest detected disk, supporting theoretical models that indicate rapid dissipation once disk clearing begins. Comparing the protoplanetary disk population in $\sigma$ Orionis to those of other star-forming regions supports the steady decline in average dust mass and the steepening of the $M_{\rm dust}$-$M_{\ast}$ relation with age; studying these evolutionary trends can inform the relative importance of different disk processes during key eras of planet formation. External photoevaporation from the central O9 star is influencing disk evolution throughout the region: dust masses clearly decline with decreasing separation from the photoionizing source, and the handful of CO detections exist at projected separations $>1.5$ pc. Collectively, our findings indicate that giant planet formation is inherently rare and/or well underway by a few Myr of age.
  • High-mass stars have generally been assumed to accrete most of their mass while already contracted onto the main sequence, but this hypothesis has not been observationally tested. We present ALMA observations of a 3 x 1.5 pc area in the W51 high-mass star-forming complex. We identify dust continuum sources and measure the gas and dust temperature through both rotational diagram modeling of CH3OH and brightness-temperature-based limits. The observed region contains three high-mass YSOs that appear to be at the earliest stages of their formation, with no signs of ionizing radiation from their central sources. The data reveal high gas and dust temperatures (T > 100 K) extending out to about 5000 AU from each of these sources. There are no clear signs of disks or rotating structures down to our 1000 AU resolution. The extended warm gas provides evidence that, during the process of forming, these high-mass stars heat a large volume and correspondingly large mass of gas in their surroundings, inhibiting fragmentation and therefore keeping a large reservoir available to feed from. By contrast, the more mature massive stars that illuminate compact H ii regions have little effect on their surrounding dense gas, suggesting that these main sequence stars have completed most or all of their accretion. The high luminosity of the massive protostars (L > 10^4 solar luminosities), combined with a lack of centimeter continuum emission from these sources, implies that they are not on the main sequence while they accrete the majority of their mass; instead, they may be bloated and cool.
  • An era has started in which gas and dust can be observed independently in protoplanetary disks, thanks to the recent surveys with ALMA. The first near-complete high-resolution disk survey in both dust and gas in a single star-forming region has been carried out in Lupus, finding surprisingly low gas/dust ratios. The goal of this work is to fully exploit CO isotopologues observations in Lupus, comparing them with physical-chemical model results, in order to obtain gas masses for a large number of disks. We have employed physical-chemical models to analyze continuum and CO isotopologues observations of Lupus disks, including isotope-selective processes and freeze-out. Employing also the ALMA 13CO-only detections, disk gas masses have been calculated for a total of 34 sources, expanding the sample of 10 disks studied by Ansdell et al. (2016), where also C18O was detected. We confirm that overall gas-masses are very low, often smaller than 1 $M_{\rm J}$, if volatile carbon is not depleted. Accordingly, global gas/dust ratios predominantly between 1 and 10. Low CO-based gas masses and gas/dust ratios may indicate rapid loss of gas, or alternatively chemical evolution, e.g. via sequestering of carbon from CO to more complex molecules, or carbon locked up in larger bodies. Current ALMA observations cannot distinguish between these two hypotheses. We have simulated both scenarios, but chemical model results do not allow us to rule out one of the two. Assuming that all Lupus disks have evolved mainly due to viscous processes over the past few Myr, the observed correlation between the current mass accretion rate and dust mass found by Manara et al. (2016) implies a constant gas-to-dust ratio, which is close to 100 based on the observed $M_{\rm disk}/\dot{M}_{\rm acc}$ ratio. This in turn points to a scenario in which carbon depletion is responsible for the low CO isotopologue line luminosities.
  • We present ALMA observations of the GQ Lup system, a young Sun-like star with a substellar mass companion in a wide-separation orbit. These observations of 870 $\mu$m continuum and CO J=3-2 line emission with beam size $\sim0.3''$ ($\sim45$ AU) resolve the disk of dust and gas surrounding the primary star, GQ Lup A, and provide deep limits on any circumplanetary disk surrounding the companion, GQ Lup b. The circumprimary dust disk is compact with a FWHM of $59\pm12$ AU, while the gas has a larger extent with a characteristic radius of $46.5\pm1.8$ AU. By forward-modeling the velocity field of the circumprimary disk based on the CO emission, we constrain the mass of GQ Lup A to be $M_* = (1.03\pm0.05)*(d/156\text{ pc})$ $M_\odot$, where $d$ is a known distance, and determine that we view the disk at an inclination angle of $60.5^\circ\pm0.5^\circ$ and a position angle of $346^\circ \pm1^\circ$. The $3\sigma$ upper limit on the 870 $\mu$m flux density of any circumplanetary disk associated with GQ Lup b of $<0.15$ mJy implies an upper limit on the dust disk mass of $<0.04$ $M_\oplus$ for standard assumptions about optically thin emission. We discuss proposed mechanisms for the formation of wide-separation substellar companions given the non-detection of circumplanetary disks around GQ Lup b and other similar systems.
  • Gravitational forces are expected to excite spiral density waves in protoplanetary disks, disks of gas and dust orbiting young stars. However, previous observations that showed spiral structure were not able to probe disk midplanes, where most of the mass is concentrated and where planet formation takes place. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array we detected a pair of trailing symmetric spiral arms in the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young star Elias 2-27. The arms extend to the disk outer regions and can be traced down to the midplane. These millimeter-wave observations also reveal an emission gap closer to the star than the spiral arms. We argue that the observed spirals trace shocks of spiral density waves in the midplane of this young disk.
  • Brown dwarf disks are excellent laboratories to test our understanding of disk physics in an extreme parameter regime. In this paper we investigate a sample of 29 well-characterized brown dwarfs and very low mass stars, for which Herschel far-infrared fluxes as well as (sub)-mm fluxes are available. We have measured new Herschel PACS fluxes for 11 objects and complement these with (sub)-mm data and Herschel fluxes from the literature. We analyze their spectral energy distributions in comparison with results from radiative transfer modeling. Fluxes in the far-infrared are strongly affected by the shape and temperature of the disk (and hence stellar luminosity), whereas the (sub)-mm fluxes mostly depend on disk mass. Nevertheless, there is a clear correlation between far-infrared and (sub)-mm fluxes. We argue that the link results from the combination of the stellar mass-luminosity relation and a scaling between disk mass and stellar mass. We find strong evidence of dust settling to the disk midplane. The spectral slopes between near- and far-infrared are mostly between $-0.5$ and $-1.2$ in our sample, comparable to more massive T Tauri stars, which may imply that the disk shapes are similar as well, though highly-flared disks are rare among brown dwarfs. We find that dust temperatures in the range of 7-15 K, calculated with $T\approx25\,(L/L_\odot)^{0.25}$ K, are appropriate for deriving disk masses from (sub)-mm fluxes for these low luminosity objects. About half of our sample hosts disks with at least one Jupiter mass, confirming that many brown dwarfs harbour sufficient material for the formation of Earth-mass planets in their midst.
  • We present a 3 mm spectral line and continuum survey of L1451 in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. These observations are from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), which also imaged Barnard 1, NGC 1333, Serpens Main and Serpens South. L1451 is the survey region with the lowest level of star formation activity---it contains no confirmed protostars. HCO+, HCN, and N2H+ (J=1-0) are all detected throughout the region, with HCO+ the most spatially widespread, and molecular emission seen toward 90% of the area above N(H_2) column densities of 1.9x10^21 cm^-2. HCO+ has the broadest velocity dispersion, near 0.3 km/s on average, compared to ~0.15 km/s for the other molecules, thus representing a range from supersonic to subsonic gas motions. Our non-binary dendrogram analysis reveals that the dense gas traced by each molecule has similar hierarchical structure, and that gas surrounding the candidate first hydrostatic core (FHSC), L1451-mm, and other previously detected single-dish continuum clumps have similar hierarchical structure; this suggests that different sub-regions of L1451 are fragmenting on the pathway to forming young stars. We determined the three-dimensional morphology of the largest detectable dense gas structures to be relatively ellipsoidal compared to other CLASSy regions, which appeared more flattened at largest scales. A virial analysis shows the most centrally condensed dust structures are likely unstable against collapse. Additionally, we identify a new spherical, centrally condensed N2H+ feature that could be a new FHSC candidate. The overall results suggest L1451 is a young region starting to form its generation of stars within turbulent, hierarchical structures.
  • We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, IRAM-30m) and space telescopes (Herschel, Planck). For the seven luminous ($L$$>$10$^{6}$ $L_{\odot}$) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified black-body fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The $\sim$10$"$ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3-kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed $\sim$10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (i.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function, the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations).
  • The first long-baseline ALMA campaign resolved the disk around the young star HL Tau into a number of axisymmetric bright and dark rings. Despite the very young age of HL Tau these structures have been interpreted as signatures for the presence of (proto)planets. The ALMA images triggered numerous theoretical studies based on disk-planet interactions, magnetically driven disk structures, and grain evolution. Of special interest are the inner parts of disks, where terrestrial planets are expected to form. However, the emission from these regions in HL Tau turned out to be optically thick at all ALMA wavelengths, preventing the derivation of surface density profiles and grain size distributions. Here, we present the most sensitive images of HL Tau obtained to date with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at 7.0 mm wavelength with a spatial resolution comparable to the ALMA images. At this long wavelength the dust emission from HL Tau is optically thin, allowing a comprehensive study of the inner disk. We obtain a total disk dust mass of 0.001 - 0.003 Msun, depending on the assumed opacity and disk temperature. Our optically thin data also indicate fast grain growth, fragmentation, and formation of dense clumps in the inner densest parts of the disk. Our results suggest that the HL Tau disk may be actually in a very early stage of planetary formation, with planets not already formed in the gaps but in the process of future formation in the bright rings.
  • The scientific impact of a facility is the most important measure of its success. Monitoring and analysing the scientific return can help to modify and optimise operations and adapt to the changing needs of scientific research. The methodology that we have developed to monitor the scientific productivity of the ALMA Observatory, as well as the first results, are described. We focus on the outcome of the first cycle (Cycle 0) of ALMA Early Science operations. Despite the fact that only two years have passed since the completion of Cycle 0 and operations have already changed substantially, this analysisconfirms the effectiveness of the underlying concepts. We find that ALMA is fulfilling its promise as a transformational facility for the observation of the Universe in the submillimetre.
  • The formation environment of stars in massive stellar clusters is similar to the environment of stars forming in galaxies at a redshift of 1 - 3, at the peak star formation rate density of the Universe. As massive clusters are still forming at the present day at a fraction of the distance to high-redshift galaxies they offer an opportunity to understand the processes controlling star formation and feedback in conditions similar to those in which most stars in the Universe formed. Here we describe a system of massive clusters and their progenitor gas clouds in the centre of the Milky Way, and outline how detailed observations of this system may be able to: (i) help answer some of the fundamental open questions in star formation and (ii) quantify how stellar feedback couples to the surrounding interstellar medium in this high-pressure, high-redshift analogue environment.
  • We present a study of the wind launching region of the Herbig Be star HD 58647 using high angular (lambda/2B=0.003") and high spectral (R=12000) resolution interferometric VLTI-AMBER observations of the near-infrared hydrogen emission line, Br-gamma. The star displays double peaks in both Br-gamma line profile and wavelength-dependent visibilities. The wavelength-dependent differential phases show S-shaped variations around the line centre. The visibility level increases in the line (by ~0.1) at the longest projected baseline (88 m), indicating that the size of the line emission region is smaller than the size of the K-band continuum-emitting region, which is expected to arise near the dust sublimation radius of the accretion disc. The data have been analysed using radiative transfer models to probe the geometry, size and physical properties of the wind that is emitting Br-gamma. We find that a model with a small magnetosphere and a disc wind with its inner radius located just outside of the magnetosphere can well reproduce the observed Br-gamma profile, wavelength-dependent visibilities, differential and closure phases, simultaneously. The mass-accretion and mass-loss rates adopted for the model are Mdot_a = 3.5 x 10^{-7} Msun/yr and Mdot_dw = 4.5 x 10^{-8} Msun/yr, respectively (Mdot_dw/Mdot_a =0.13). Consequently, about 60 per cent of the angular momentum loss rate required for a steady accretion with the measured accretion rate is provide by the disc wind. The small magnetosphere in HD 58647 does not contribute to the Br-gamma line emission significantly.
  • This paper discusses compelling science cases for a future long-baseline interferometer operating at millimeter and centimeter wavelengths, like the proposed Next Generation Vary Large Array (ngVLA). We report on the activities of the Cradle of Life science working group, which focused on the formation of low- and high-mass stars, the formation of planets and evolution of protoplanetary disks, the physical and compositional study of Solar System bodies, and the possible detection of radio signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. We propose 19 scientific projects based on the current specification of the ngVLA. Five of them are highlighted as possible Key Science Projects: (1) Resolving the density structure and dynamics of the youngest HII regions and high-mass protostellar jets, (2) Unveiling binary/multiple protostars at higher resolution, (3) Mapping planet formation regions in nearby disks on scales down to 1 AU, (4) Studying the formation of complex molecules, and (5) Deep atmospheric mapping of giant planets in the Solar System. For each of these projects, we discuss the scientific importance and feasibility. The results presented here should be considered as the beginning of a more in-depth analysis of the science enabled by such a facility, and are by no means complete or exhaustive.