• We report on the first open-use based Atacama Large Millimeter/submm Array (ALMA) 345-GHz observation for the late afterglow phase of GRB131030A. The ALMA observation constrained a deep limit at 17.1 d for the afterglow and host galaxy. We also identified a faint submillimeter source (ALMAJ2300-0522) near the GRB131030A position. The deep limit at 345 GHz and multifrequency observations obtained using {\it Swift} and RATIR yielded forward shock modeling with a two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic jet simulation and described X-ray excess in the afterglow. The excess was inconsistent with the synchrotron self-inverse Compton radiation from the forward shock. The host galaxy of GRB131030A and optical counterpart of ALMAJ2300-0522 were also identified in the SUBARU image. Based on the deep ALMA limit for the host galaxy, the 3-$\sigma$ upper limits of IR luminosity and the star formation rate (SFR) is estimated as $L_{IR}<1.11\times10^{11} L_{\odot}$ and SFR$<18.7$ ($M_{\odot}$~yr$^{-1}$), respectively. Although the separation angle from the burst location (3.5 arcsec) was rather large, ALMAJ2300-0522 may be one component of the GRB131030A host galaxy, according to previous host galaxy cases.
  • We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous ($M_{r}\approx-27.8$ mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 140226A. This marks the first unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically distant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of $\Re_{\mathrm{rel}}=610$ yr$^{-1}$ (68% confidence interval of 110-2000 yr$^{-1}$). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncertainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona fide "orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lacking detectable high-energy emission) on GRB beaming and the degree of baryon loading in these relativistic jets.
  • We present spatially- and velocity-resolved echelle spectroscopy for NGC 7009 obtained with the UVES spectrograph at the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. Our objective is to analyze the kinematics of emission lines excited by recombination and collisions with electrons to determine whether similarities or differences could be useful in elucidating the well-known abundance discrepancy derived from them. We construct position-velocity maps for recombination, fluorescence, charge transfer, and collisionally-excited lines. We find a plasma component emitting in the C II, N II, O II, and Ne II recombination lines whose kinematics are discrepant: They are incompatible with the ionization structure derived from all other evidence and the kinematics derived from all of these lines are unexpectedly very similar. We find direct evidence for a recombination contribution to [N II] 5755. Once taken into account, the electron temperatures from [N II], [O III], and [Ne III] agree at a given position and velocity. The electron densities derived from [O II] and [Ar IV] are consistent with direct imaging and the distribution of hydrogen emission. The kinematics of the C II, N II, O II, and Ne II lines does not coincide with the kinematics of the [O III] and [Ne III] forbidden emission, indicating that there is an additional plasma component to the recombination emission that arises from a different volume from that giving rise to the forbidden emission from the parent ions within NGC 7009. Thus, the chemical abundances derived from either type of line are correct only for the plasma component from which they arise. Apart from [N II] 5755, we find no anomaly with the forbidden lines usually used to determine chemical abundances in ionized nebulae, so the abundances derived from them should be reliable for the medium from which they arise.
  • The next decade of survey astronomy has the potential to transform our knowledge of variable stars. Stellar variability underpins our knowledge of the cosmological distance ladder, and provides direct tests of stellar formation and evolution theory. Variable stars can also be used to probe the fundamental physics of gravity and degenerate material in ways that are otherwise impossible in the laboratory. The computational and engineering advances of the past decade have made large-scale, time-domain surveys an immediate reality. Some surveys proposed for the next decade promise to gather more data than in the prior cumulative history of astronomy. The actual implementation of these surveys will have broad implications for the types of science that will be enabled. We examine the design considerations for an optimal time-domain photometric survey dedicated to variable star science, including: observing cadence, wavelength coverage, photometric and astrometric accuracy, single-epoch and cumulative depth, overall sky coverage, and data access by the broader astronomical community. The best surveys must combine aspects from each of these considerations to fully realize the potential for the next decade of time-domain science.
  • We present high resolution spectroscopic observations of the massive X-ray binary system LS I+65 010=2S 0114+650 in the optical wavelength region. A correlation between equivalent width and radial velocity of photospheric absorption lines is found. The systemic velocity, inferred from the weaker lines is v_helio = -31 +/- 5 km s^-1, which, if attributed solely to the Galactic rotation curve, implies that LS I+65 010 lies within 3 kpc from the Sun. The ISM Na I D lines display 2 resolved high velocity components at v_helio = -70, -48 km s^-1, possibly associated with gas surrounding the binary system, in addition to the -24, -8 km s^-1 ISM features due to the Orion and the Perseus arm regions. Strong photospheric line profile variability is present on a night to night timescale, with He I 5875 A displaying an additional blue-shifted absorption in some of the spectra, similar to what is observed in the optical counterpart of Vela X-1. A connection between the extended blue wing and X-ray maximum is suggested. Short timescale variations in line profiles are detected on only two nights, but the evidence that these variations occur on the 2.78 hour X-ray flaring period is marginal.