• On the road of searching for Majorana zero modes (MZMs) in topological insulator-based Josephson junctions, a highly-sought signature is the protected full transparency of electron transport through the junctions due to the existence of the MZMs, associated with complete gap closing between the electron-like and hole-like Andreev bound states (ABSs). Here, we present direct experimental evidence of gap closing and full transparency in single Josephson junctions constructed on the surface of three-dimensional topological insulator (3D TI) Bi$_2$Te$_3$. Our results demonstrate that the 2D surface of 3D TIs provides a promising platform for hosting and manipulating MZMs.
  • Unconventional superconductivity is one of the most fascinating and intriguing quantum phenomena in condensed matter physics. Recently, Ising superconductivity has been theoretically predicated and experimentally realized in noncentrosymmetric monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) MX2 (M =W, Mo and X=Te, Se, S). However, unconventional superconductivity in centrosymmetric TMDCs remains an open issue. Here, we report transport evidence of Ising superconductivity in few-layer 1Td-MoTe2 crystals. Our low-temperature magnetotransport experiments show that the in-plane upper critical field ($H_{c2,//}$) is at least 6 times higher than the Pauli paramagnetic limit ($H_p$), which strongly suggests the Zeeman-protected Ising superconductivity in the sample. Our study sheds light on the interplay between unconventional superconductivity and crystal symmetry property, and may pave a new avenue to search for unconventional superconductors in centrosymmetric TMDCs.
  • Dimensionality plays an essential role in determining the anomalous non-Fermi liquid properties in heavy fermion systems. So far most heavy fermion compounds are quasi-two-dimensional or three-dimensional. Here we report the synthesis and systematic investigations of the single crystals of the quasi-one-dimensional Kondo lattice CeCo$_2$Ga$_8$. Resistivity measurements at ambient pressure reveal the onset of coherence at $T^*\approx 20\,$K and non-Fermi liquid behavior with linear temperature dependence over a decade in temperature from 2 K to 0.1 K. The specific heat increases logarithmically with lowering temperature between 10 K and 2 K and reaches 800 mJ/mol K$^2$ at 1 K, suggesting that CeCo$_2$Ga$_8$ is a heavy fermion compound in the close vicinity of a quantum critical point. Resistivity measurements under pressure further confirm the non-Fermi liquid behavior in a large temperature-pressure range. The magnetic susceptibility is found to follow the typical behavior for a one-dimensional (1D) spin chain from 300 K down to $T^*$, and first-principles calculations predict flat Fermi surfaces for the itinerant $f$-electron bands. These suggest that CeCo$_2$Ga$_8$ is a rare example of the quasi-1D Kondo lattice, but its non-Fermi liquid behaviors resemble those of the quasi-two-dimensional YbRh$_2$Si$_2$ family. The study of the quasi-one-dimensional CeCo$_2$Ga$_8$ family may therefore help us to understand the role of dimensionality on heavy fermion physics and quantum criticality.
  • Superconducting quantum circuits are promising candidate for building scalable quantum computers. Here, we use a four-qubit superconducting quantum processor to solve a two-dimensional system of linear equations based on a quantum algorithm proposed by Harrow, Hassidim, and Lloyd [Phys. Rev. Lett. \textbf{103}, 150502 (2009)], which promises an exponential speedup over classical algorithms under certain circumstances. We benchmark the solver with quantum inputs and outputs, and characterize it by non-trace-preserving quantum process tomography, which yields a process fidelity of $0.837\pm0.006$. Our results highlight the potential of superconducting quantum circuits for applications in solving large-scale linear systems, a ubiquitous task in science and engineering.
  • There have been continuous efforts in searching for unconventional superconductivity over the past five decades. Compared to the well-established d-wave superconductivity in cuprates, the existence of superconductivity with other high-angular-momentum pairing symmetries is less conclusive. Bi/Ni epitaxial bilayer is a potential unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry (TRS), for that it demonstrates superconductivity and ferromagnetism simultaneously at low temperatures. We employ a specially designed superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect, on the Bi/Ni bilayer, the orbital magnetic moment which is expected if the TRS is broken. An anomalous hysteretic magnetic response has been observed in the superconducting state, providing the evidence for the existence of chiral superconducting domains in the material.
  • Atomically thin transitional metal ditellurides like WTe2 and MoTe2 have triggered tremendous research interests because of their intrinsic nontrivial band structure. They are also predicted to be 2D topological insulators and type-II Weyl semimetals. However, most of the studies on ditelluride atomic layers so far rely on the low-yield and time-consuming mechanical exfoliation method. Direct synthesis of large-scale monolayer ditellurides has not yet been achieved. Here, using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, we demonstrate controlled synthesis of high-quality and atom-thin tellurides with lateral size over 300 {\mu}m. We found that the as-grown WTe2 maintains two different stacking sequences in the bilayer, where the atomic structure of the stacking boundary is revealed by scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The low-temperature transport measurements revealed a novel semimetal-to-insulator transition in WTe2 layers and an enhanced superconductivity in few-layer MoTe2. This work paves the way to the synthesis of atom-thin tellurides and also quantum spin Hall devices.
  • The quantized version of the anomalous Hall effect has been predicted to occur in magnetic topological insulators, but the experimental realization has been challenging. Here, we report the observation of the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3, a magnetic topological insulator. At zero magnetic field, the gate-tuned anomalous Hall resistance reaches the predicted quantized value of h/e^2,accompanied by a considerable drop of the longitudinal resistance. Under a strong magnetic field, the longitudinal resistance vanishes whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value. The realization of the QAH effect may lead to the development of low-power-consumption electronics.
  • The engineering of quantum devices has reached the stage where we now have small scale quantum processors containing multiple interacting qubits within them. Simple quantum circuits have been demonstrated and scaling up to larger numbers is underway. However as the number of qubits in these processors increases, it becomes challenging to implement switchable or tunable coherent coupling among them. The typical approach has been to detune each qubit from others or the quantum bus it connected to, but as the number of qubits increases this becomes problematic to achieve in practice due to frequency crowding issues. Here, we demonstrate that by applying a fast longitudinal control field to the target qubit, we can turn off its couplings to other qubits or buses (in principle on/off ratio higher than 100 dB). This has important implementations in superconducting circuits as it means we can keep the qubits at their optimal points, where the coherence properties are greatest, during coupling/decoupling processing. Our approach suggests a new way to control coupling among qubits and data buses that can be naturally scaled up to large quantum processors without the need for auxiliary circuits and yet be free of the frequency crowding problems.
  • Recently, much attention has been paid to search for Majorana fermions in solid-state systems. Among various proposals there is one based on radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (rf-SQUIDs), in which the appearance of 4$\pi$-period energy-phase relations is regarded as smoking-gun evidence of Majorana fermion states. Here we report the observation of truncated 4$\pi$-period (i.e., 2$\pi$-period but fully skewed) oscillatory patterns of contact resistance on rf-SQUIDs constructed on the surface of three-dimensional topological insulator Bi$_2$Te$_3$. The results reveal the existence of 1/2 fractional modes of Cooper pairs and the occurrence of parity switchings, both of which are necessary signatures accompanied with the formation of Majorana fermion states.
  • We have investigated the magnetoresistive behavior of Dirac semi-metal Cd3As2 down to low temperatures and in high magnetic fields. A positive and linear magnetoresistance (LMR) as large as 3100% is observed in a magnetic field of 14 T, on high-quality single crystals of Cd3As2 with ultra-low electron density and large Lande g factor. Such a large LMR occurs when the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to both the current and the (100) surface, and when the temperature is low such that the thermal energy is smaller than the Zeeman splitting energy. Tilting the magnetic field or raising the temperature all degrade the LMR, leading to a less pronounced quadratic behavior. We propose that the phenomenon of LMR is related to the peculiar field-induced shifting/distortion of the helical electrons' Fermi surfaces in momentum space.
  • It is believed that the edges of a chiral p-wave superconductor host Majorana modes, relating to a mysterious type of fermions predicted seven decades ago. Much attention has been paid to search for p-wave superconductivity in solid-state systems, including recently those with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). However, smoking-gun experiments are still awaited. In this work, we have performed phase-sensitive measurements on particularly designed superconducting quantum interference devices constructing on the surface of topological insulators Bi2Te3, in such a way that a substantial portion of the interference loop is built on the proximity-effect-induced superconducting surface. Two types of Cooper interference patterns have been recognized at low temperatures. One is s-wave like and is contributed by a zero-phase loop inhabited in the bulk of Bi2Te3. The other, being identified to relate to the surface states, is anomalous for that there is a phase shift between the positive and negative bias current directions. The results support that the Cooper pairs on the surface of Bi2Te3 have a 2\pi Berry phase which makes the superconductivity p_x+ip_y-wave-like. Mesoscopic hybrid rings as constructed in this experiment are presumably arbitrary-phase loops good for studying topological quantum phenomena.
  • We have studied the electron transport properties of topological insulator-related material Bi2Se3 near the superconducting Pb-Bi2Se3 interface, and found that a superconducting state is induced over an extended volume in Bi2Se3. This state can carry a Josephson supercurrent, and demonstrates a gap-like structure in the conductance spectra as probed by a normal-metal electrode. The establishment of the gap is not by confining the electrons into a narrow space close to the superconductor-normal metal interface, as previously observed in other systems, but presumably via electron-electron attractive interaction in Bi2Se3.
  • We have investigated the conductance spectra of Sn-Bi2Se3 interface junctions down to 250 mK and in different magnetic fields. A number of conductance anomalies were observed below the superconducting transition temperature of Sn, including a small gap different from that of Sn, and a zero-bias conductance peak growing up at lower temperatures. We discussed the possible origins of the smaller gap and the zero-bias conductance peak. These phenomena support that a proximity-effect-induced chiral superconducting phase is formed at the interface between the superconducting Sn and the strong spin-orbit coupling material Bi2Se3.
  • Majarona fermions (MFs) were predicted more than seven decades ago but are yet to be identified [1]. Recently, much attention has been paid to search for MFs in condensed matter systems [2-10]. One of the seaching schemes is to create MF at the interface between an s-wave superconductor (SC) and a 3D topological insulator (TI) [11-13]. Experimentally, progresses have been achieved in the observations of a proximity-effect-induced supercurrent [14-16], a perfect Andreev reflection [17] and a conductance peak at the Fermi level [18]. However, further characterizations are still needed to clarify the nature of the SC-TI interface. In this Letter, we report on a strong proximity effect in Pb-Bi2Te3 hybrid structures, based on which Josephson junctions and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be constructed. Josephson devices of this type would provide a test-bed for exploring novel phenomena such as MFs in the future.
  • Quantum phase diffusion in a small underdamped Nb/AlO$_x$/Nb junction ($\sim$ 0.4 $\mu$m$^2$) is demonstrated in a wide temperature range of 25-140 mK where macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) is the dominant escape mechanism. We propose a two-step transition model to describe the switching process in which the escape rate out of the potential well and the transition rate from phase diffusion to the running state are considered. The transition rate extracted from the experimental switching current distribution follows the predicted Arrhenius law in the thermal regime but is greatly enhanced when MQT becomes dominant.
  • The properties of phase escape in a dc SQUID at 25 mK, which is well below quantum-to-classical crossover temperature $T_{cr}$, in the presence of strong resonant ac driving have been investigated. The SQUID contains two Nb/Al-AlO$_{x} $/Nb tunnel junctions with Josephson inductance much larger than the loop inductance so it can be viewed as a single junction having adjustable critical current. We find that with increasing microwave power $W$ and at certain frequencies $\nu $ and $\nu $/2, the single primary peak in the switching current distribution, \textrm{which is the result of macroscopic quantum tunneling of the phase across the junction}, first shifts toward lower bias current $I$ and then a resonant peak develops. These results are explained by quantum resonant phase escape involving single and two photons with microwave-suppressed potential barrier. As $W$ further increases, the primary peak gradually disappears and the resonant peak grows into a single one while shifting further to lower $I$. At certain $W$, a second resonant peak appears, which can locate at very low $I$ depending on the value of $\nu $. Analysis based on the classical equation of motion shows that such resonant peak can arise from the resonant escape of the phase particle with extremely large oscillation amplitude resulting from bifurcation of the nonlinear system. Our experimental result and theoretical analysis demonstrate that at $T\ll T_{cr}$, escape of the phase particle could be dominated by classical process, such as dynamical bifurcation of nonlinear systems under strong ac driving.
  • Electrical control of spin dynamics in Bi$_{\rm 2}$Se$_{\rm 3}$ was investigated in ring-type interferometers. Aharonov-Bohm and Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak resistance oscillations against magnetic field, and Aharorov-Casher resistance oscillations against gate voltage were observed in the presence of a Berry phase of $\pi$. A very large tunability of spin precession angle by gate voltage has been obtained, indicating that Bi$_{\rm 2}$Se$_{\rm 3}$-related materials with strong spin-orbit coupling are promising candidates for constructing novel spintronic devices.
  • Superconductor films on semiconductor substrates draw much attention recently since the derived superconductor-based electronics have been shown promising for future data process and storage technologies. By growing atomically uniform single-crystal epitaxial Pb films of several nanometers thick on Si wafers to form a sharp superconductor-semiconductor heterojunction, we have obtained an unusual giant magnetoresistance effect when the Pb film is superconducting. In addition to the great fundamental interest of this effect, the simple structure and compatibility and scalability with current Si-based semiconductor technology offer a great opportunity for integrating superconducting circuits and detectors in a single chip.
  • We report the observation of a novel phenomenon, the self-retracting motion of graphite, in which tiny flakes of graphite, after being displaced to various suspended positions from islands of highly orientated pyrolytic graphite, retract back onto the islands under no external influences. Our repeated probing and observing such flakes of various sizes indicate the existence of a critical size of flakes, approximately 35 micrometer, above which the self-retracting motion does not occur under the operation. This helps to explain the fact that the self-retracting motion of graphite has not been reported, because samples of natural graphite are typical larger than this critical size. In fact, reports of this phenomenon have not been found in the literature for single crystals of any kinds. A model that includes the static and dynamic shear strengths, the van der Waals interaction force, and the edge dangling bond interaction effect, was used to explain the observed phenomenon. These findings may conduce to create nano-electromechanical systems with a wide range of mechanical operating frequency from mega to giga hertzs.
  • The phase-sensitive experiments on cuprate superconductors have told us about the symmetry of the condensate wavefunction. However, they can not determine the pairing symmetry of Cooper pairs. To describe a superconducting state, two wavefunctions are needed, condensate wavefunction and pairing wavefunction. The former describes the entirety movement of the pairs and the latter describes the relative movement of the two electrons within a pair. The $\pi$-phase shift observed in the phase sensitive Josephson measurements can not prove that the pairing state is d-wave. We present here a new explanation and predict some new observable phenomena.