• New physics at the TeV scale can affect the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition in many ways. In this note, we evaluate its impact on the rate of baryon-number violation via sphaleron transitions. We parameterize the effect of new physics with dimension-6 operators, and we use the Newton-Kantorovich method to numerically solve the resulting equations of motion. Depending on the sign of the coefficient of the dimension-6 operators, their presence can either increase or decrease the sphaleron energy at the level of a few percent, parametrically of order $m_W^2 / \Lambda^2$ where $\Lambda$ is the scale suppressing the dimension-6 operator. The baryon-number washout condition, typically written as $v_c / T_c > 1$, is directly proportional to the sphaleron energy, and we discuss how the presence of dimension-6 operators can affect electroweak baryogenesis.
  • Precision measurements at the LHC can provide probes of new physics, and they are complementary to direct searches. The high energy distribution of di-boson processes ($WW,WZ,Vh$) is a promising place, with the possibility of significant improvement in sensitivity as the data accumulates. We focus on the semi-leptonic final states, and make projections of the reach for future runs of the LHC with integrated luminosities of 300 fb$^{-1}$ and 3 ab$^{-1}$. We emphasize the importance of tagging the polarization of the vector bosons, in particular for the $WW$ and $WZ$ channels. We employ a combination of kinematical distributions of both the $W$ and $Z$, and their decay products to select the longitudinally polarized $W$ and $Z$. We have also included our projections for the reach using the associated production of vector boson and the Higgs. We demonstrate that di-boson measurement in the semi-leptonic channel can surpass the sensitivity of the precision measurement at LEP, and they can be significantly more sensitive than the HL-LHC $h \to Z \gamma$ measurements. Compared with fully leptonic decaying $WZ$ channel, the reach from semi-leptonic channel can be better with effective suppression of the reducible background and systematic error. We have also considered the reaches on the new physics mass scale in different new physics scenarios, including the Strongly Interacting-Light Higgs (SILH), the Strongly Coupled Multi-pole Interaction (Remedios), and the class of models with partially composite fermions. We find that in the SILH and non-compact Remedios scenario with large coupling $g_* > 7$, measurements in the di-boson channel is more sensitive than the Drell-Yan di-lepton channel at the HL-LHC.
  • The QCD axion's coupling to photons is often assumed to lie in a narrow band as a function of the axion mass. We demonstrate that several simple mechanisms, in addition to the photophilic clockwork axion already in the literature, can significantly extend the allowed range of couplings. Some mechanisms we present generalize the KNP alignment scenario, widely studied as a model of inflation, to the phenomenology of a QCD axion. In particular we present KSVZ-like realizations of two-axion KNP alignment and of the clockwork mechanism. Such a "confinement tower" realization of clockwork may prove useful in a variety of model-building contexts. We also show that kinetic mixing of the QCD axion with a lighter axion-like particle can dramatically alter the QCD axion's coupling to photons, differing from the other models we present by allowing non-quantized couplings. The simple models that we present fully cover the range of axion-photon couplings that could be probed by experiments. They motivate growing axion detection efforts over a wide space of masses and couplings.
  • We describe a composite Higgs scenario in which a cosmological relaxation mechanism naturally gives rise to a hierarchy between the weak scale and the scale of spontaneous global symmetry breaking. This is achieved through the scanning of sources of explicit global symmetry breaking by a relaxion field during an exponentially long period of inflation in the early universe. We explore this mechanism in detail in a specific composite Higgs scenario with QCD-like dynamics, based on an ultraviolet $SU(N)_{\textrm{TC}}$ 'technicolor' confining gauge theory with three Dirac technifermion flavors. We find that we can successfully generate a hierarchy of scales $\xi \equiv \langle h \rangle^2 / F_\pi^2 \gtrsim 1.2 \times 10^{-4}$ (i.e., compositeness scales $F_\pi \sim 20$ TeV) without tuning. This evades all current electroweak precision bounds on our (custodial violating) model. While directly observing the heavy composite states in this model will be challenging, a future electroweak precision measurement program can probe most of the natural parameter space for the model. We also highlight signatures of more general composite Higgs models in the cosmological relaxation framework, including some implications for flavor and dark matter.
  • Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) together with weak lensing measurements of the clustering of large scale cosmological structures and local measurements of the Hubble constant pose a challenge to the standard $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. On one side CMB observations imply a Hubble constant that is lower than local measurements and an amplitude of the lensing signal that is higher than direct measurements from weak lensing surveys. We investigate a way of relieving these tensions by adding dark radiation tightly coupled to an acoustic part of the dark matter sector and compare it to massive neutrino solutions. While these models offer a way of separately relieving the Hubble and weak lensing tensions they are prevented from fully accommodating both at the same time since the CMB requires additional cold dark matter when adding acoustic dark matter or massive neutrinos to preserve the same sharpness of the acoustic peaks which counteracts the desired growth suppression.
  • A light meta-stable dark photon decaying into collimated electron/positron pair can fake a photon, either converted or unconverted, at the LHC. The detailed object identification relies on the specifics of the detector and strategies for the reconstruction. We study the fake rate based on the ATLAS(CMS) detector geometry and show that it can be O(1) with a generic choice of parameters. Especially, the probability of being registered as a photon is angular dependent. Such detector effects can induce bias to measurements on certain properties of new physics. In this paper, we consider the scenario where dark photons in final states are from a heavy resonance decay. Consequently, the detector effects can dramatically affect the results when determine the spin of a resonance. Further, if the decay products from the heavy resonance are one photon and one dark photon, which has a large probability to fake a diphoton event, the resonance is allowed to be a vector. Due to the difference in detector, the cross sections measured in ATLAS and CMS do not necessarily match. Furthermore, if the diphoton signal is given by the dark photons, the SM $Z\gamma$ and $ZZ$ final states do not necessarily come with the $\gamma\gamma$ channel, which is a unique signature in our scenario. The issue studied here is relevant also for any future new physics searches with photon(s) in the final state. We discuss possible ways of distinguishing dark photon decay and real photon in the future.
  • After the discovery of the Higgs boson, understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking and the associated electroweak phase transition has become the most pressing question in particle physics. Answering this question is a priority for experimental studies. Data from the LHC and future lepton collider-based Higgs factories may uncover new physics coupled to the Higgs boson, which can induce the electroweak phase transition to become first order. Such a phase transition generates a stochastic background of gravitational waves, which could potentially be detected by a space-based gravitational wave interferometer. In this paper, we survey a few classes of models in which the electroweak phase transition is strongly first order. We identify the observables that would provide evidence of these models at the LHC and next-generation lepton colliders, and we assess whether the corresponding gravitational wave signal could be detected by eLISA. We find that most of the models with first order electroweak phase transition can be covered by the precise measurements of Higgs couplings at the proposed Higgs factories. We also map out the model space that can be probed with gravitational wave detection by eLISA.
  • A light stop with mass almost degenerate with the lightest neutralino has important connections with both naturalness and dark matter relic abundance. This region is also very hard to probe at colliders. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of searching for such stop particles at the LHC from sbottom decays, focusing on two channels with final states $2\ell+E^{\rm miss}_{\rm T}$ and $1b1\ell+E^{\rm miss}_{\rm T}$. We found that, if the lightest sbottom has mass around or below 1 TeV and has a significant branching ratio to decay to stop and $W$ ($\tilde{b} \to \tilde{t}\,W$), a stop almost degenerate with neutralino can be excluded up to about 500-600 GeV at the 13 TeV LHC with $300\,{\rm fb}^{-1}$ data. The searches we propose are complementary to other SUSY searches at the LHC and could have the best sensitivity to the stop-bino coannihilation region. Since they involve final states which have already been used in LHC searches, a reinterpretation of the search results already has sensitivity. Further optimization could deliver the full potential of these channels.
  • Discovery of unexpected properties of the Higgs boson offers an intriguing opportunity of shedding light on some of the most profound puzzles in particle physics. The Beyond Standard Model (BSM) decays of the Higgs boson could reveal new physics in a direct manner. Future electron-positron lepton colliders operating as Higgs factories, including CEPC, FCC-ee and ILC, with the advantages of a clean collider environment and large statistics, could greatly enhance the sensitivity in searching for these BSM decays. In this work, we perform a general study of Higgs exotic decays at future $e^+e^-$ lepton colliders, focusing on the Higgs decays with hadronic final states and/or missing energy, which are very challenging for the High-Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). We show that with simple selection cuts, $O(10^{-3}\sim10^{-5})$ limits on the Higgs exotic decay branching fractions can be achieved using the leptonic decaying spectator $Z$ boson in the associated production mode $e^+e^-\rightarrow Z H$. We further discuss the interplay between the detector performance and Higgs exotic decay, and other possibilities of exotic decays. Our work is a first step in a comprehensive study of Higgs exotic decays at future lepton colliders, which is a key ingredient of Higgs physics that deserves further investigation.
  • We study a scenario in which the baryon asymmetry of the universe arises from a cosmological phase transition where lepton-number is spontaneously broken. If the phase transition is first order, a lepton-number asymmetry can arise at the bubble wall, through dynamics similar to electroweak baryogenesis, but involving right-handed neutrinos. In addition to the usual neutrinoless double beta decay in nuclear experiments, the model may be probed through a variety of "baryogenesis by-products," which include a stochastic background of gravitational waves created by the colliding bubbles. Depending on the model, other aspects may include a network of topological defects that produce their own gravitational waves, additional contribution to dark radiation, and a light pseudo-Goldstone boson (majoron) as dark matter candidate.
  • We study the sensitivity of future electron-positron colliders to UV completions of the fermionic Higgs portal operator $H^\dagger H \bar \chi \chi$. Measurements of precision electroweak $S$ and $T$ parameters and the $e^+e^- \to Zh$ cross section at the CEPC, FCC-ee, and ILC are considered. The scalar completion of the fermionic Higgs portal is closely related to the scalar Higgs portal, and we summarize existing results. We devote the bulk of our analysis to a singlet-doublet fermion completion. Assuming the doublet is sufficiently heavy, we construct the effective field theory (EFT) at dimension-6 in order to compute contributions to the observables. We also provide full one-loop results for $S$ and $T$ in the general mass parameter space. In both completions, future precision measurements can probe the new states at the (multi-)TeV scale, beyond the direct reach of the LHC.
  • Many new physics models predict sizable modifications to the SM Zbb couplings, while the corresponding measurements at LEP and SLC exhibit some discrepancy with the SM predictions. After updating the current results on the Zbb coupling constraints from global fits, we list the observables that are most important for improving the Zbb coupling constraints and estimate the expected precision reach of three proposed future e+e- colliders, CEPC, ILC and FCC-ee. We consider both the case that the results are SM-like and the one that the Zbb couplings deviate significantly from the SM predictions. We show that, if we assume the value of the Zbb couplings to be within 68% CL of the current measurements, any one of the three colliders will be able to rule out the SM with more than 99.9999% CL (5 sigma). We study the implications of the improved Zbb coupling constraints on new physics models, and point out their complementarity with the constraints from the direct search of new physics particles at the LHC, as well as with Higgs precision measurements. Our results provide a further motivation for the construction of future e+e- colliders.
  • This document summarises the proposal of the LHC Dark Matter Working Group on how to present LHC results on $s$-channel simplified dark matter models and to compare them to direct (indirect) detection experiments.
  • In this paper we explore the possibility of a pseudoscalar resonance to account for the 750 GeV diphoton excess observed both at ATLAS and at CMS. We analyze the ingredients needed from the low energy perspective to obtain a sufficiently large diphoton rate to explain the signal while avoiding constraints from other channels. Additionally, we point out composite Higgs models in which one can naturally obtain a pseudoscalar at the 750 GeV mass scale and we estimate the pseudoscalar couplings to standard model particles that one would have in such models. A generic feature of models that can explain the excess is the presence of new particles in addition to the 750 GeV state. Finally, we note that due to the origin of the coupling of the resonance to photons, one expects to see comparable signals in the $Z\gamma$, $ZZ$, and $WW$ channels.
  • Collider experiments provide an opportunity to shed light on dark matter (DM) self-interactions. In this work, we study the possibility of generating DM bound states -- the Darkonium -- at the LHC and discuss how the annihilation decay of the Darkonium produces force carriers. We focus on two popular scenarios that contain large DM self-couplings: the Higgsinos in the $\lambda$-SUSY model, and self-interacting DM (SIDM) framework. After forming bound states, the DM particles annihilate into force mediators, which decay into the standard model particles either through a prompt or displaced process. This generates interesting signals for the heavy resonance search. We calculate the production rate of bound states and study the projected future constraints from the existing heavy resonance searches.
  • The discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC exposes some of the most profound mysteries fundamental physics has encountered in decades, opening the door to the next phase of experimental exploration. More than ever, this will necessitate new machines to push us deeper into the energy frontier. In this article, we discuss the physics motivation and present the physics potential of a proton-proton collider running at an energy significantly beyond that of the LHC and a luminosity comparable to that of the LHC. 100 TeV is used as a benchmark of the center of mass energy, with integrated luminosities from 3 inverse ab to 30 inverse ab.
  • Light top superpartners play a key role in stabilizing the electroweak scale in supersymmetric theories. For $R$-parity conserved supersymmetric models, traditional searches are not sensitive to the compressed regions. In this paper, we propose a new method targeting this region, with stop and neutralino mass splitting ranging from $m_{\tilde t} - m_\chi \gtrsim m_t$ to about 20 GeV. In particular, we focus on the signal process in which a pair of stops are produced in association with a hard jet, and define a new observable $R_M$ whose distribution has a peak in this compressed region. The position of the peak is closely correlated with $m_{\tilde t}$. We show that for 13 TeV LHC with a luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$, this analysis can extend the reach of stop in the compressed region to $m_{\tilde t}$ around 800 GeV.
  • In this paper, we discuss the signal of composite spin-1 resonances at the LHC. Motivated by the possible observation of a diboson resonance in the 8 TeV LHC data, we demonstrate that vector resonances from composite Higgs models are able to describe the data. We pay particular attention to the role played by fermion partial compositeness, which is a common feature in composite Higgs models. The parameter space that is both able to account for the diboson excess and passes electroweak precision and flavor tests is explored. Finally, we make projections for signals of such resonances at the 13 TeV run of the LHC.
  • Testing the idea of naturalness is and will continue to be one of the most important goals of high energy physics experiments. It will play a central role in the physics program of future colliders. In this paper, we present projections of the reach of natural SUSY at future lepton colliders: CEPC, FCC-ee and ILC. We focus on the observables which give the strongest reach, the electroweak precision observables (for left-handed stops), and Higgs to gluon and photon decay rates (for both left- and right-handed stops). There is a "blind spot" when the stop mixing parameter Xt is approximately equal to the average stop mass. We argue that in natural scenarios, bounds on the heavy Higgs bosons from tree-level mixing effects that modify the bottom Yukawa coupling together with bounds from b to s gamma play a complementary role in probing the blind spot region. For specific natural SUSY scenarios such as folded SUSY in which the top partners do not carry Standard Model color charges, electroweak precision observables could be the most sensitive probe. In all the scenarios discussed in this paper, the combined set of precision measurements will probe down to a few percent in fine-tuning.
  • The future of high-precision electroweak physics lies in e+e- collider measurements of properties of the Z boson, the W boson, the Higgs boson, and the top quark. We estimate the expected performance of three possible future colliders: the ILC, FCC-ee (formerly known as TLEP), and CEPC. In particular, we present the first estimates of the possible reach of CEPC, China's proposed Circular Electron-Positron Collider, for the oblique parameters S and T and for seven-parameter fits of Higgs couplings. These results allow the physics potential for CEPC to be compared with that of the ILC and FCC-ee. We also show how the constraints on S and T would evolve as the uncertainties on each of the most important input measurements change separately. This clarifies the basic physics goals for future colliders. To improve on the current precision, the highest priorities are improving the uncertainties on the W mass and effective weak mixing angle. At the same time, improved measurements of the top mass, the Z mass, the running of alpha, and the Z width will offer further improvement which will determine the ultimate reach. Each of the possible future colliders we consider has strong prospects for probing TeV-scale electroweak physics.
  • A fermion dark matter candidate with a relic abundance set by annihilation through a pseudoscalar can evade constraints from direct detection experiments. We present simplified models that realize this fact by coupling a fermion dark sector to a two-Higgs doublet model. These models are generalizations of mixed bino-Higgsino dark matter in the MSSM, with more freedom in the couplings and scalar spectra. Annihilation near a pseudoscalar resonance allows a significant amount of parameter space for thermal relic dark matter compared to singlet-doublet dark matter, in which the fermions couple only to the SM Higgs doublet. In a general two-Higgs doublet model, there is also freedom for the pseudoscalar to be relatively light and it is possible to obtain thermal relic dark matter candidates even below 100 GeV. In particular, we find ample room to obtain dark matter with mass around 50 GeV and fitting the Galactic Center excess in gamma-rays. This region of parameter space can be probed by LHC searches for heavy pseudoscalars or electroweakinos, and possibly by other new collider signals.
  • Daniel Abercrombie, Nural Akchurin, Ece Akilli, Juan Alcaraz Maestre, Brandon Allen, Barbara Alvarez Gonzalez, Jeremy Andrea, Alexandre Arbey, Georges Azuelos, Patrizia Azzi, Mihailo Backović, Yang Bai, Swagato Banerjee, James Beacham, Alexander Belyaev, Antonio Boveia, Amelia Jean Brennan, Oliver Buchmueller, Matthew R. Buckley, Giorgio Busoni, Michael Buttignol, Giacomo Cacciapaglia, Regina Caputo, Linda Carpenter, Nuno Filipe Castro, Guillelmo Gomez Ceballos, Yangyang Cheng, John Paul Chou, Arely Cortes Gonzalez, Chris Cowden, Francesco D'Eramo, Annapaola De Cosa, Michele De Gruttola, Albert De Roeck, Andrea De Simone, Aldo Deandrea, Zeynep Demiragli, Anthony DiFranzo, Caterina Doglioni, Tristan du Pree, Robin Erbacher, Johannes Erdmann, Cora Fischer, Henning Flaecher, Patrick J. Fox, Benjamin Fuks, Marie-Helene Genest, Bhawna Gomber, Andreas Goudelis, Johanna Gramling, John Gunion, Kristian Hahn, Ulrich Haisch, Roni Harnik, Philip C. Harris, Kerstin Hoepfner, Siew Yan Hoh, Dylan George Hsu, Shih-Chieh Hsu, Yutaro Iiyama, Valerio Ippolito, Thomas Jacques, Xiangyang Ju, Felix Kahlhoefer, Alexis Kalogeropoulos, Laser Seymour Kaplan, Lashkar Kashif, Valentin V. Khoze, Raman Khurana, Khristian Kotov, Dmytro Kovalskyi, Suchita Kulkarni, Shuichi Kunori, Viktor Kutzner, Hyun Min Lee, Sung-Won Lee, Seng Pei Liew, Tongyan Lin, Steven Lowette, Romain Madar, Sarah Malik, Fabio Maltoni, Mario Martinez Perez, Olivier Mattelaer, Kentarou Mawatari, Christopher McCabe, Théo Megy, Enrico Morgante, Stephen Mrenna, Siddharth M. Narayanan, Andy Nelson, Sérgio F. Novaes, Klaas Ole Padeken, Priscilla Pani, Michele Papucci, Manfred Paulini, Christoph Paus, Jacopo Pazzini, Björn Penning, Michael E. Peskin, Deborah Pinna, Massimiliano Procura, Shamona F. Qazi, Davide Racco, Emanuele Re, Antonio Riotto, Thomas G. Rizzo, Rainer Roehrig, David Salek, Arturo Sanchez Pineda, Subir Sarkar, Alexander Schmidt, Steven Randolph Schramm, William Shepherd, Gurpreet Singh, Livia Soffi, Norraphat Srimanobhas, Kevin Sung, Tim M. P. Tait, Timothee Theveneaux-Pelzer, Marc Thomas, Mia Tosi, Daniele Trocino, Sonaina Undleeb, Alessandro Vichi, Fuquan Wang, Lian-Tao Wang, Ren-Jie Wang, Nikola Whallon, Steven Worm, Mengqing Wu, Sau Lan Wu, Hongtao Yang, Yong Yang, Shin-Shan Yu, Bryan Zaldivar, Marco Zanetti, Zhiqing Zhang, Alberto Zucchetta
    July 3, 2015 hep-ph, hep-ex
    This document is the final report of the ATLAS-CMS Dark Matter Forum, a forum organized by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations with the participation of experts on theories of Dark Matter, to select a minimal basis set of dark matter simplified models that should support the design of the early LHC Run-2 searches. A prioritized, compact set of benchmark models is proposed, accompanied by studies of the parameter space of these models and a repository of generator implementations. This report also addresses how to apply the Effective Field Theory formalism for collider searches and present the results of such interpretations.
  • Discovering dark matter at high energy colliders continues to be a compelling and well-motivated possibility. Weakly interacting massive particles are a particularly interesting class in which the dark matter particles interact with the standard model weak gauge bosons. Neutralinos are a prototypical example that arise in supersymmetric models. In the limit where all other superpartners are decoupled, it is known that for relic density motivated masses, the rates for neutralinos are too small to be discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), but that they may be large enough for a 100 TeV collider to observe. In this work we perform a careful study in the vector boson fusion channel for pure winos and pure higgsinos. We find that given a systematic uncertainty of 1% (5%), with 3000 fb$^{-1}$, the LHC is sensitive to winos of 240 GeV (125 GeV) and higgsinos of 125 GeV (55 GeV). A future 100 TeV collider would be sensitive to winos of 1.1 TeV (750 GeV) and higgsinos of 530 GeV (180 GeV) with a 1% (5%) uncertainty, also with 3000 fb$^{-1}$.
  • We combine the Twin Higgs mechanism with the paradigm of Composite Higgs models. In this class of models the Higgs is a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson from a strongly coupled sector near the TeV scale, and it is additionally protected by a discrete symmetry due to the twin mechanism. We discuss the model building issues associated with this setup and quantify the tuning needed to achieve the correct electroweak vacuum and the Higgs mass. In contrast to standard Composite Higgs models, the lightest resonance associated with the top sector is the uncolored mirror top, while the colored top partners can be made parameterically heavier without extra tuning. In some cases, the vector resonances are predicted to lie in the multi-TeV range. We present models where the resonances - both fermions and vectors - being heavier alleviates the pressure on naturalness coming from direct searches demonstrating that theories with low tuning may survive constraints from the Large Hadron Collider.
  • We consider diverse examples of science goals that provide a framework to assess luminosity goals for a future 100-TeV proton-proton collider.