• We investigate the non-Abelian topological chiral spin liquid phase in the two-dimensional (2D) Kitaev honeycomb model subject to a magnetic field. By combining density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) and exact diagonalization (ED) we study the energy spectra, entanglement, topological degeneracy, and expectation values of Wilson loop operators, allowing for robust characterization. While the ferromagnetic (FM) Kitaev spin liquid is already destroyed by a weak magnetic field with Zeeman energy $H_*^\text{FM} \approx 0.02$, the antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin liquid remains robust up to a magnetic field that is an order of magnitude larger, $H_*^\text{AFM} \approx 0.2$. Interestingly, for larger fields $H_*^\text{AFM} < H < H_{**}^\text{AFM}$, an intermediate gapless phase is observed, before a second transition to the high-field partially-polarized paramagnet. We attribute this rich phase diagram, and the remarkable stability of the chiral topological phase in the AFM Kitaev model, to the interplay of strong spin-orbit coupling and frustration enhanced by the magnetic field. Our findings suggest relevance to recent experiments on RuCl$_3$ under magnetic fields.
  • We study the inelastic scattering rate due to Coulomb interaction in three-dimensional Dirac/Weyl semimetals at finite temperature. We show that the perturbation theory diverges because of the long-range nature of the interaction, hence, thermally induced screening must be taken into account. We demonstrate that the scattering rate has a non-monotonic energy dependence with a sharp peak owing to the resonant decay into thermal plasmons. We also consider Hubbard interaction for comparison. We show that, in contrast to the Coulomb case, it can be well-described by the second-order perturbation theory in a wide energy range.
  • We propose a two-orbital Hubbard model on an emergent honeycomb lattice to describe the low-energy physics of graphene superlattices. Our model provides a theoretical basis for studying metal-insulator transition, Landau level degeneracy lifting and superconductivity that are recently observed in twisted bilayer graphene.
  • The search for Majorana bound state (MBS) has recently emerged as one of the most active research areas in condensed matter physics, fueled by the prospect of using its non-Abelian statistics for robust quantum computation. A highly sought-after platform for MBS is two-dimensional topological superconductors, where MBS is predicted to exist as a zero-energy mode in the core of a vortex. A clear observation of MBS, however, is often hindered by the presence of additional low-lying bound states inside the vortex core. By using scanning tunneling microscope on the newly discovered superconducting Dirac surface state of iron-based superconductor FeTe1-xSex (x = 0.45, superconducting transition temperature Tc = 14.5 K), we clearly observe a sharp and non-split zero-bias peak inside a vortex core. Systematic studies of its evolution under different magnetic fields, temperatures, and tunneling barriers strongly suggest that this is the case of tunneling to a nearly pure MBS, separated from non-topological bound states which is moved away from the zero energy due to the high ratio between the superconducting gap and the Fermi energy in this material. This observation offers a new, robust platform for realizing and manipulating MBSs at a relatively high temperature.
  • We show that an in-plane magnetic field can drive two-dimensional spin-orbit-coupled systems under superconducting proximity effect into a gapless phase where parts of the normal state Fermi surface are gapped, and the ungapped parts are reconstructed into a small Fermi surface of Bogoliubov quasiparticles at zero energy. Charge distribution, spin texture, and density of states of such "partial Fermi surface" are discussed. Material platforms for its physical realization are proposed.
  • We propose a platform for universal quantum computation that uses conventional $s$-wave superconducting leads to address a topological qubit stored in spatially separated Majorana bound states in a multi-terminal topological superconductor island. Both the manipulation and read-out of this "Majorana superconducting qubit" are realized by tunnel couplings between Majorana bound states and the superconducting leads. The ability of turning on and off tunnel couplings on-demand by local gates enables individual qubit addressability while avoiding cross-talk errors. By combining the scalability of superconducting qubit and the robustness of topological qubits, the Majorana superconducting qubit may provide a promising and realistic route towards quantum computation.
  • The thermoelectric effect is the generation of an electrical voltage from a temperature gradient in a solid material due to the diffusion of free charge carriers from hot to cold. Identifying materials with large thermoelectric response is crucial for the development of novel electric generators and coolers. In this paper we consider theoretically the thermopower of Dirac/Weyl semimetals subjected to a quantizing magnetic field. We contrast their thermoelectric properties with those of traditional heavily-doped semiconductors and we show that, under a sufficiently large magnetic field, the thermopower of Dirac/Weyl semimetals grows linearly with the field without saturation and can reach extremely high values. Our results suggest an immediate pathway for achieving record-high thermopower and thermoelectric figure of merit, and they compare well with a recent experiment on Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_x$Se.
  • Motivated by recent experiments on Kondo insulators, we theoretically study quantum oscillations from disorder-induced in-gap states in small-gap insulators. By solving a non-Hermitian Landau level problem that incorporates the imaginary part of electron's self-energy, we show that the oscillation period is determined by the Fermi surface area in the absence of the hybridization gap, and derive an analytical formula for the oscillation amplitude as a function of the indirect band gap, scattering rates, and temperature. Over a wide parameter range, we find that the effective mass is controlled by scattering rates, while the Dingle factor is controlled by the indirect band gap. We also show the important effect of scattering rates in reshaping the quasiparticle dispersion in connection with angle-resolved photoemission measurements on heavy fermion materials.
  • We study two-component electrons in the lowest Landau level at total filling factor $\nu_T=1/2$ with anisotropic mass tensors and principal axes rotated by $\pi/2$ as realized in Aluminum Arsenide (AlAs) quantum wells. Combining exact diagonalization and the density matrix renormalization group we demonstrate that the system undergoes a quantum phase transition from a gapless state in which both flavors are equally populated to another gapless state in which all the electrons spontaneously polarize into a single flavor beyond a critical mass anisotropy of {\bf $m_x/m_y \sim 7$}. We propose that this phase transition is a form of itinerant Stoner transition between a two-component and a single-component composite fermi sea states and describe a set of trial wavefunctions which successfully capture the quantum numbers and shell filling effects in finite size systems as well as providing a physical picture for the energetics of these states. Our estimates indicate that the composite fermi sea of AlAs is the analogue of an itinerant Stoner magnet with a finite spontaneous valley polarization. We pinpoint experimental evidence indicating the presence of Stoner magnetism in the Jain states surrounding $\nu=1/2$.
  • We show that disordered Dirac fermion systems in two dimensions generally exhibit bulk Fermi arc replacing the Dirac point in the clean limit, provided that the Dirac fermion arises from two distinct orbitals unrelated by symmetry. This result is explicitly demonstrated in a disordered Dirac model that we introduce, where the disorder potential acts differently on the two orbitals and drives the system into a new strongly disordered phase.
  • We study the topological properties of superconductors with paired $j=\frac{3}{2}$ quasiparticles. Higher spin Fermi surfaces can arise, for instance, in strongly spin-orbit coupled band-inverted semimetals. Examples include the Bi-based half-Heusler materials, which have recently been established as low-temperature and low-carrier density superconductors. Motivated by this experimental observation, we obtain a comprehensive symmetry-based classification of topological pairing states in systems with higher angular momentum Cooper pairing. Our study consists of two main parts. First, we develop the phenomenological theory of multicomponent (i.e., higher angular momentum) pairing by classifying the stationary points of the free energy within a Ginzburg-Landau framework. Based on the symmetry classification of stationary pairing states, we then derive the symmetry-imposed constraints on their gap structures. We find that, depending on the symmetry quantum numbers of the Cooper pairs, different types of topological pairing states can occur: fully gapped topological superconductors in class DIII, Dirac superconductors and superconductors hosting Majorana fermions. Notably, we find a series of nematic fully gapped topological superconductors, as well as double-Dirac superconductors with quadratic dispersion. Our approach, applied here to the case of $j=\frac{3}{2}$ Cooper pairing, is rooted in the symmetry properties of pairing states, and can therefore also be applied to other systems with higher angular momentum and high-spin pairing. We conclude by relating our results to experimentally accessible signatures in thermodynamic and dynamic probes.
  • We study the phase diagram and edge states of a two-dimensional p-wave superconductor with long-range hopping and pairing amplitudes. New topological phases and quasiparticles different from the usual short-range model are obtained. When both hopping and pairing terms decay with the same exponent, one of the topological chiral phases with propagating Majorana edge states gets significantly enhanced by long-range couplings. On the other hand, when the long-range pairing amplitude decays more slowly than the hopping, we discover new topological phases where propagating Majorana fermions at each edge pair nonlocally and become gapped even in the thermodynamic limit. Remarkably, these nonlocal edge states are still robust, remain separated from the bulk, and are localized at both edges at the same time. The inclusion of long-range effects is potentially applicable to recent experiments with magnetic impurities and islands in 2D superconductors.
  • We study a time-reversal-invariant topological superconductor island hosting spatially separated Majorana Kramers pairs, with weak tunnel couplings to two s-wave superconducting leads. When the topological superconductor island is in the Coulomb blockade regime, we predict that a Josephson current flows between the two leads due to a non-local transfer of Cooper pairs mediated by the Majorana Kramers pairs. Interestingly, we find that the sign of the Josephson current is controlled by the joint parity of all four Majorana bound states on the island. Consequently, this parity-controlled Josephson effect can be used for qubit read-out in Majorana-based quantum computing.
  • Self-learning Monte Carlo (SLMC) method is a general algorithm to speedup MC simulations. Its efficiency has been demonstrated in various systems by introducing an effective model to propose global moves in the configuration space. In this paper, we show that deep neural networks can be naturally incorporated into SLMC, and without any prior knowledge, can accurately learn the original model accurately and efficiently. Demonstrated in quantum impurity models, we reduce the complexity for a local update from $ \mathcal{O}(\beta^2) $ in Hirsch-Fye algorithm to $ \mathcal{O}(\beta \log \beta) $, which is a significant speedup especially for systems at low temperatures.
  • We study broken symmetry states at integer Landau level fillings in multivalley quantum Hall systems whose low energy dispersions are anisotropic. When the Fermi surface of individual pockets lacks twofold rotational symmetry, like in Bismuth (111) and in Sn$_{1-x}$Pb$_x$Se (001) surfaces, interactions tend to drive the formation of quantum Hall ferroelectric states. We demonstrate that the dipole moment in these states has an intimate relation to the Fermi surface geometry of the parent metal. In quantum Hall nematic states, like those arising in AlAs quantum wells, we demonstrate the existence of unusually robust skyrmion quasiparticles.
  • Topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) possess metallic surface states protected by crystalline symmetry, which are a versatile platform for exploring topological phenomena and potential applications. However, progress in this field has been hindered by the challenge to probe optical and transport properties of the surface states owing to the presence of bulk carriers. Here we report infrared (IR) reflectance measurements of a TCI, (001) oriented $Pb_{1-x}Sn_{x}Se$ in zero and high magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the far-IR conductivity is unexpectedly dominated by the surface states as a result of their unique band structure and the consequent small IR penetration depth. Moreover, our experiments yield a surface mobility of 40000 $cm^{2}/(Vs)$, which is one of the highest reported values in topological materials, suggesting the viability of surface-dominated conduction in thin TCI crystals. These findings pave the way for exploring many exotic transport and optical phenomena and applications predicted for TCIs.
  • The kagome lattice is a two-dimensional network of corner-sharing triangles known as a platform for exotic quantum magnetic states. Theoretical work has predicted that the kagome lattice may also host Dirac electronic states that could lead to topological and Chern insulating phases, but these have evaded experimental detection to date. Here we study the d-electron kagome metal Fe$_3$Sn$_2$ designed to support bulk massive Dirac fermions in the presence of ferromagnetic order. We observe a temperature independent intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity persisting above room temperature suggestive of prominent Berry curvature from the time-reversal breaking electronic bands of the kagome plane. Using angle-resolved photoemission, we discover a pair of quasi-2D Dirac cones near the Fermi level with a 30 meV mass gap that accounts for the Berry curvature-induced Hall conductivity. We show this behavior is a consequence of the underlying symmetry properties of the bilayer kagome lattice in the ferromagnetic state with atomic spin-orbit coupling. This report provides the first evidence for a ferromagnetic kagome metal and an example of emergent topological electronic properties in a correlated electron system. This offers insight into recent discoveries of exotic electronic behavior in kagome lattice antiferromagnets and may provide a stepping stone toward lattice model realizations of fractional topological quantum states.
  • The magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridate material Eu$_2$Ir$_2$O$_7$ (5$d^5$) have been studied based on the first principle calculations, where the crystal field splitting $\Delta$, spin-orbit coupling (SOC) $\lambda$ and Coulomb interaction $U$ within Ir 5$d$ orbitals are all playing significant roles. The ground state phase diagram has been obtained with respect to the strength of SOC and Coulomb interaction $U$, where a stable anti-ferromagnetic ground state with all-in/all-out (AIAO) spin structure has been found. Besides, another anti-ferromagnetic states with close energy to AIAO have also been found to be stable. The calculated nonlinear magnetization of the two stable states both have the d-wave pattern but with a $\pi/4$ phase difference, which can perfectly explain the experimentally observed nonlinear magnetization pattern. Compared with the results of the non-distorted structure, it turns out that the trigonal lattice distortion is crucial for stabilizing the AIAO state in Eu$_2$Ir$_2$O$_7$. Furthermore, besides large dipolar moments, we also find considerable octupolar moments in the magnetic states.
  • We study the phase diagram of quantum Hall bilayer systems with total filing $\nu_T=1/2+1/2$ of the lowest Landau level as a function of layer distances $d$. Based on numerical exact diagonalization calculations, we obtain three distinct phases, including an exciton superfluid phase with spontaneous interlayer coherence at small $d$, a composite Fermi liquid at large $d$, and an intermediate phase for $1.1<d/l_B<1.8$ ($l_B$ is the magnetic length). The transition from the exciton superfluid to the intermediate phase is identified by (i) a dramatic change in the Berry curvature of the ground state under twisted boundary conditions on the two layers; (ii) an energy level crossing of the first excited state. The transition from the intermediate phase to the composite Fermi liquid is identified by the vanishing of the exciton superfluid stiffness. Furthermore, from our finite-size study, the energy cost of transferring one electron between the layers shows an even-odd effect and possibly extrapolates to a finite value in the thermodynamic limit, indicating the enhanced intralayer correlation. Our identification of an intermediate phase and its distinctive features shed new light on the theoretical understanding of the quantum Hall bilayer system at total filling $\nu_T=1$.
  • Motivated by the recent numerical simulations for doped $t$-$J$ model on honeycomb lattice, we study superconductivity of singlet and triplet pairing on honeycomb lattice Hubbard model. We show that a superconducting state with coexisting spin-singlet and spin-triplet pairings is induced by the antiferromagnetic order near half-filling. The superconducting state we obtain has a topological phase transition that separates a topologically trivial state and a nontrivial state with Chern number two. Possible experimental realization of such a topological superconductivity is also discussed.
  • Electrons in the pyrochore iridates experience a large interaction energy in addition to a strong spin-orbit interaction. Both features make the iridates promising for realizing novel states such as the Topological Mott Insulator. The pyrochlore iridate Eu$_2$Ir$_2$O$_7$ shows a metal-insulator transition at $T_N \sim$ 120 K below which a magnetically ordered state develops. Using torque magnetometry, we uncover a highly unusual magnetic response. A magnetic field $\bf H$ applied in its $a$-$b$ plane produces a nonlinear magnetization $M_\perp$ orthogonal to the plane. $M_\perp$ displays a $d$-wave field-angle pattern consistent with octupolar order, with a handedness dictated by field cooling, leading to symmetry breaking of the chirality $\omega$. A surprise is that the lobe orientation of the $d$-wave pattern is sensitive to the direction of the field when the sample is field-cooled below $T_N$, suggestive of an additional order parameter $\eta$ already present at 300 K.
  • The recently-introduced self-learning Monte Carlo method is a general-purpose numerical method that speeds up Monte Carlo simulations by training an effective model to propose uncorrelated configurations in the Markov chain. We implement this method in the framework of continuous time Monte Carlo method with auxiliary field in quantum impurity models. We introduce and train a diagram generating function (DGF) to model the probability distribution of auxiliary field configurations in continuous imaginary time, at all orders of diagrammatic expansion. By using DGF to propose global moves in configuration space, we show that the self-learning continuous-time Monte Carlo method can significantly reduce the computational complexity of the simulation.
  • We study the quantum phase transition between a paramagnetic and ferromagnetic metal in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling in one dimension. Using bosonization, we analyze the transition by means of renormalization group, controlled by an $\varepsilon$-expansion around the upper critical dimension of two. We show that the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling allows for a new nonlinear term in the bosonized action, which generically leads to a fluctuation driven first-order transition. We further demonstrate that the Euclidean action of this system maps onto a classical smectic-A -- C phase transition in a magnetic field in two dimensions. We show that the smectic transition is second-order and is controlled by a new critical point.
  • The ideas of topology have found tremendous success in Hermitian physical systems, but even richer properties exist in the more general non-Hermitian framework. Here, we theoretically propose and experimentally demonstrate a new topologically-protected bulk Fermi arc which---unlike the well-known surface Fermi arcs arising from Weyl points in Hermitian systems---develops from non-Hermitian radiative losses in photonic crystal slabs. Moreover, we discover half-integer topological charges in the polarization of far-field radiation around the Fermi arc. We show that both phenomena are direct consequences of the non-Hermitian topological properties of exceptional points, where resonances coincide in their frequencies and linewidths. Our work connects the fields of topological photonics, non-Hermitian physics and singular optics, and paves the way for future exploration of non-Hermitian topological systems.
  • We show that in the presence of $n$-fold rotation symmetries and time-reversal symmetry, the number of fermion flavors must be a multiple of $2n$ ($n=2,3,4,6$) on two-dimensional lattices, a stronger version of the well-known fermion doubling theorem in the presence of only time-reversal symmetry. The violation of the multiplication theorems indicates anomalies, and may only occur on the surface of new classes of topological crystalline insulators. Put on a cylinder, these states have $n$ Dirac cones on the top and on the bottom surfaces, connected by $n$ helical edge modes on the side surface.