• SrRuO$_3$ heterostructures grown in the (111) direction are a rare example of thin film ferromagnets. By means of density functional theory plus dynamical mean field theory we show that the half-metallic ferromagnetic state with an ordered magnetic moment of 2$\mu_{B}$/Ru survives the ultimate dimensional confinement down to a bilayer, even at elevated temperatures of 500$\,$K. In the minority channel, the spin-orbit coupling opens a gap at the linear band crossing corresponding to $\frac34$ filling of the $t_{2g}$ shell. We demonstrate that the respective state is Haldane's quantum anomalous Hall state with Chern number $C$=1, without an external magnetic field or magnetic impurities.
  • Thickness driven electronic phase transitions are broadly observed in different types of functional perovskite heterostructures. However, uncertainty remains whether these effects are solely due to spatial confinement, broken symmetry or rather to a change of structure with varying film thickness. Here, we present direct evidence for the relaxation of oxygen 2p and Mn 3d orbital (p-d) hybridization coupled to the layer dependent octahedral tilts within a La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 film driven by interfacial octahedral coupling. An enhanced Curie temperature is achieved by reducing the octahedral tilting via interface structure engineering. Atomically resolved lattice, electronic and magnetic structures together with X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrate the central role of thickness dependent p-d hybridization in the widely observed dimensionality effects present in correlated oxide heterostructures.
  • Using a combination of first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations and exact diagonalization studies of a first-principles derived model, we carry out a microscopic analysis of the magnetic properties of the half-metallic double perovskite compound, Sr$_2$CrMoO$_6$, a sister compound of the much discussed material Sr$_2$FeMoO$_6$. The electronic structure of Sr$_2$CrMoO$_6$, though appears similar to Sr$_2$FeMoO$_6$ at first glance, shows non trivial differences with that of Sr$_2$FeMoO$_6$ on closer examination. In this context, our study highlights the importance of charge transfer energy between the two transition metal sites. The change in charge transfer energy due to shift of Cr $d$ states in Sr$_2$CrMoO$_6$ compared to Fe $d$ in Sr$_2$FeMoO$_6$ suppresses the hybridization between Cr $t_{2g}$ and Mo $t_{2g}$. This strongly weakens the hybridization-driven mechanism of magnetism discussed for Sr$_2$FeMoO$_6$. Our study reveals that, nonetheless, the magnetic transition temperature of Sr$_2$CrMoO$_6$ remains high since additional superexchange contribution to magnetism arises with a finite intrinsic moment developed at the Mo site. We further discuss the situation in comparison to another related double perovskite compound, Sr$_2$CrWO$_6$. We also examine the effect of correlation beyond DFT, using dynamical mean field theory (DMFT).
  • Experimental efforts to stabilize ferromagnetism in ultrathin films of transition metal oxides have so far failed, despite expectations based on density functional theory (DFT) and DFT+U. Here, we investigate one of the most promising materials, SrRuO$_3$, and include correlation effects beyond DFT by means of dynamical mean field theory. In agreement with experiment we find an intrinsic thickness limitation for metallic ferromagnetism in SrRuO$_3$ thin films. Indeed, we demonstrate that the realization of ultrathin ferromagnetic films is out of reach of standard thin-film techniques. Proposing charge carrier doping as a new route to manipulate thin films, we predict room temperature ferromagnetism in electron-doped SrRuO$_3$ ultra thin films.
  • One of the most fundamental phenomena and a reminder of the electron's relativistic nature is the Rashba spin splitting for broken inversion symmetry. Usually this splitting is a tiny relativistic correction, hardly discernible in experiment. Interfacing a ferroelectric, BaTiO$_3$, and a heavy 5$d$ metal with a large spin-orbit coupling, Ba(Os,Ir)O$_3$, we show that giant Rashba spin splittings are indeed possible and even fully controllable by an external electric field. Based on density functional theory and a microscopic tight binding understanding, we conclude that the electric field is amplified and stored as a ferroelectric Ti-O distortion which, through the network of oxygen octahedra, also induces a large Os-O distortion. The BaTiO$_3$/BaOsO$_3$ heterostructure is hence the ideal test station for studying the fundamentals of the Rashba effect. It allows intriguing application such as the Datta-Das transistor to operate at room temperature.