• Faint star-forming galaxies at $z\sim 2-3$ can be used as alternative background sources to probe the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest in addition to quasars, yielding high sightline densities that enable 3D tomographic reconstruction of the foreground absorption field. Here, we present the first data release from the COSMOS Lyman-Alpha Mapping And Mapping Observations (CLAMATO) Survey, which was conducted with the LRIS spectrograph on the Keck-I telescope. Over an observational footprint of 0.157$\mathrm{deg}^2$ within the COSMOS field, we used 240 galaxies and quasars at $2.17<z<3.00$, with a mean comoving transverse separation of $2.37\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc^3}$, as background sources probing the foreground Lyman-$\alpha$ forest absorption at $2.05<z<2.55$. The Lyman-$\alpha$ forest data was then used to create a Wiener-filtered tomographic reconstruction over a comoving volume of $3.15\,\times 10^5\,h^{-3}\,\mathrm{Mpc^3}$ with an effective smoothing scale of $2.5\,h^{-1}\,\mathrm{Mpc}$. In addition to traditional figures, this map is also presented as a virtual-reality YouTube360 video visualization and manipulable interactive figure. We see large overdensities and underdensities that visually agree with the distribution of coeval galaxies from spectroscopic redshift surveys in the same field, including overdensities associated with several recently-discovered galaxy protoclusters in the volume. This data release includes the redshift catalog, reduced spectra, extracted Lyman-$\alpha$ forest pixel data, and tomographic map of the absorption.
  • We present the most distant detection of cosmic voids ($z \sim 2.3$) and the first detection of three-dimensional voids in the Lyman-$\alpha$ forest. We used a 3D tomographic map of the absorption with effective comoving spatial resolution of $2.5\,h^{-1}\mathrm{Mpc}$ and volume of $3.15\times 10^5\,h^{-3}\mathrm{Mpc}^3$, which was reconstructed from moderate-resolution Keck-I/LRIS spectra of 240 background Lyman-break galaxies and quasars in a $0.16\,\mathrm{deg}^2$ footprint in the COSMOS field. Voids were detected using a spherical overdensity finder calibrated from hydrodynamical simulations of the intergalactic medium. This allows us to identify voids in the IGM corresponding to voids in the underlying matter density field, yielding a consistent volume fraction of voids in both data (19.5%) and simulations (18.2%). We fit excursion set models to the void radius function and compare the radially-averaged stacked profiles of large voids ($r > 5$ $h^{-1}$ Mpc) to stacked voids in mock observations and the simulated density field. Comparing with 432 coeval galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the same volume as the tomographic map, we find that the tomography-identified voids are underdense in galaxies by 5.95$\sigma$ compared to random cells.
  • We carried out targeted ALMA observations of 129 fields in the COSMOS region at 1.25 mm, detecting 152 galaxies at S/N$\geq$5 with an average continuum RMS of 150 $\mu$Jy. These fields represent a S/N-limited sample of AzTEC / ASTE sources with 1.1 mm S/N$\geq$4 over an area of 0.72 square degrees. Given ALMA's fine resolution and the exceptional spectroscopic and multiwavelength photometric data available in COSMOS, this survey allows us unprecedented power in identifying submillimeter galaxy counterparts and determining their redshifts through spectroscopic or photometric means. In addition to 30 sources with prior spectroscopic redshifts, we identified redshifts for 113 galaxies through photometric methods and an additional nine sources with lower limits, which allowed a statistically robust determination of the redshift distribution. We have resolved 33 AzTEC sources into multi-component systems and our redshifts suggest that nine are likely to be physically associated. Our overall redshift distribution peaks at $z\sim$2.0 with a high redshift tail skewing the median redshift to $\tilde{z}$=2.48$\pm$0.05. We find that brighter millimeter sources are preferentially found at higher redshifts. Our faintest sources, with S$_{1.25 \rm mm}$<1.25 mJy, have a median redshift of $\tilde{z}$=2.18$\pm$0.09, while the brightest sources, S$_{1.25 \rm mm}$>1.8 mJy, have a median redshift of $\tilde{z}$=3.08$\pm$0.17. After accounting for spectral energy distribution shape and selection effects these results are consistent with several previous submillimeter galaxy surveys, and moreover, support the conclusion that the submillimeter galaxy redshift distribution is sensitive to survey depth.
  • We present results on the dust attenuation of galaxies at redshift $\sim3-6$ by studying the relationship between the UV spectral slope ($\beta_{\rm UV}$) and the infrared excess (IRX; $L_{\rm IR}$/$L_{\rm UV}$) using ALMA far-infrared continuum observations. Our study is based on a sample of 67 massive, star-forming galaxies with a median mass of $M_{\ast}\sim 10^{10.7}\,M_{\rm \odot}$ spanning a redshift range $z=2.6-3.7$ (median $z=3.2$) that were observed with ALMA at $\lambda_{rest}=300\,{\rm \mu m}$. Both the individual ALMA detections (41 sources) and stacks including all galaxies show the IRX-$\beta_{\rm UV}$ relationship at $z\sim3$ is mostly consistent with that of local starburst galaxies on average. However, we find evidence for a large dispersion around the mean relationship by up to $\pm0.5$ dex. Nevertheless, the locally calibrated dust correction factors based on the IRX-$\beta_{\rm UV}$ relation are on average applicable to main-sequence $z\sim3$ galaxies. This does not appear to be the case at even higher redshifts, however. Using public ALMA observations of $z\sim4-6$ galaxies we find evidence for a significant evolution in the IRX-$\beta_{\rm UV}$ and the IRX-$M_{\ast}$ relations beyond $z\sim3$ toward lower IRX values. We discuss several caveats that could affect these results, including the assumed dust temperature. ALMA observations of larger $z>3$ galaxy samples will be required to confirm this intriguing redshift evolution.
  • We report a discovery of 6 massive galaxies with both extremely large Lya equivalent width and evolved stellar population at z ~ 3. These MAssive Extremely STrong Lya emitting Objects (MAESTLOs) have been discovered in our large-volume systematic survey for strong Lya emitters (LAEs) with twelve optical intermediate-band data taken with Subaru/Suprime-Cam in the COSMOS field. Based on the SED fitting analysis for these LAEs, it is found that these MAESTLOs have (1) large rest-frame equivalent width of EW_0(Lya) ~ 100--300 A, (2) M_star ~ 10^10.5--10^11.1 M_sun, and (3) relatively low specific star formation rates of SFR/M_star ~ 0.03--1 Gyr^-1. Three of the 6 MAESTLOs have extended Ly$\alpha$ emission with a radius of several kpc although they show very compact morphology in the HST/ACS images, which correspond to the rest-frame UV continuum. Since the MAESTLOs do not show any evidence for AGNs, the observed extended Lya emission is likely to be caused by star formation process including the superwind activity. We suggest that this new class of LAEs, MAESTLOs, provides a missing link from star-forming to passively evolving galaxies at the peak era of the cosmic star-formation history.
  • We present the [OII] luminosity function measured in the redshift range 0.1<z<1.65 with unprecedented depth and accuracy. Our measurements are based on medium resolution flux-calibrated spectra of emission line galaxies with the FORS2 instrument at VLT and with the SDSS-III/BOSS spectrograph. The FORS2 spectra and the corresponding catalog containing redshifts and line fluxes are released along with this paper. In this work we use a novel method to combine the aforementioned surveys with GAMA, zCOSMOS and VVDS, which have different target selection, producing a consistent weighting scheme to derive the [OII] luminosity function. The measured luminosity function is in good agreement with previous independent estimates. The comparison with two state-of-the-art semi-analytical models is good, which is encouraging for the production of mock catalogs of [OII] flux limited surveys. We observe the bright end evolution over 8.5 Gyr: we measure the decrease of log L* from 42.4 erg/s at redshift 1.44 to 41.2 at redshift 0.165 and we find that the faint end slope flattens when redshift decreases. This measurement confirms the feasibility of the target selection of future baryonic acoustic oscillation surveys aiming at observing [OII] flux limited samples.
  • We perform a pixel-by-pixel analysis of 467 galaxies in the GOODS-VIMOS survey to study systematic effects in extracting properties of stellar populations (age, dust, metallicity and SFR) from pixel colors using the pixel-z method. The systematics studied include the effect of the input stellar population synthesis model, passband limitations and differences between individual SED fits to pixels and global SED-fitting to a galaxy's colors. We find that with optical-only colors, the systematic errors due to differences among the models are well constrained. The largest impact on the age and SFR e-folding time estimates in the pixels arises from differences between the Maraston models and the Bruzual&Charlot models, when optical colors are used. This results in systematic differences larger than the 2{\sigma} uncertainties in over 10 percent of all pixels in the galaxy sample. The effect of restricting the available passbands is more severe. In 26 percent of pixels in the full sample, passband limitations result in systematic biases in the age estimates which are larger than the 2{\sigma} uncertainties. Systematic effects from model differences are reexamined using Near-IR colors for a subsample of 46 galaxies in the GOODS-NICMOS survey. For z > 1, the observed optical/NIR colors span the rest frame UV-optical SED, and the use of different models does not significantly bias the estimates of the stellar population parameters compared to using optical-only colors. We then illustrate how pixel-z can be applied robustly to make detailed studies of substructure in high redshift galaxies such as (a) radial gradients of age, SFR, sSFR and dust and (b) the distribution of these properties within subcomponents such as spiral arms and clumps. Finally, we show preliminary results from the CANDELS survey illustrating how the new HST/WFC3 data can be exploited to probe substructure in z~1-3 galaxies.
  • Now that large databases of resolved galaxy images are provided by modern imaging surveys, advanced morphological studies can be envisioned, urging for well defined calibration samples. We present the EFIGI catalogue, a multiwavelength database specifically designed for a dense sampling of all Hubble types. The catalogue merges data from standard surveys and catalogues (Principal Galaxy Catalogue, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Value-Added Galaxy Catalogue, HyperLeda, and the NASA Extragalactic Database) and provides detailed morphological information. Imaging data are obtained from the SDSS DR4 in the u, g, r, i, and z bands for a sample of 4458 PGC galaxies, whereas photometric and spectroscopic data are obtained from the SDSS DR5 catalogue. Point-Spread Function models are derived in all five bands. Composite colour images of all objects are visually examined by a group of astronomers, and galaxies are staged along the Hubble sequence and classified according to 16 morphological attributes describing their structure, texture, as well as environment and appearance on a five-level scale. The EFIGI Hubble sequence shows remarkable agreement with the RC3 Revised Hubble Sequence. The main characteristics and reliability of the catalogue are examined, including photometric completeness, type mix, systematic trends and correlations. The final EFIGI database is a large sub-sample of the local Universe, with a dense sampling of Sd, Sdm, Sm and Im types compared to magnitude-limited catalogues. We estimate the photometric catalogue to be more than ~ 80% complete for galaxies with 10<g<14. More than 99.5% of EFIGI galaxies have a known redshift in the HyperLeda and NED databases.
  • We present the first catalog of 67 strong galaxy-galaxy lens candidates discovered in the 1.64 square degree Hubble Space Telescope COSMOS survey. Twenty of these systems display multiple images or strongly curved large arcs. Our initial search is performed by visual inspection of the data and is restricted, for practical considerations, to massive early-type lens galaxies with arcs found at radii smaller than ~5''. Simple mass models are constructed for the best lens candidates and our results are compared to the strong lensing catalogs of the SLACS survey and the CASTLES database. These new strong galaxy-galaxy lensing systems constitute a valuable sample to study the mass distribution of early-type galaxies and their associated dark matter halos. We further expect this sample to play an important role in the testing of software algorithms designed to automatically search for strong gravitational lenses. From our analysis a robust lower limit is derived for the expected occurrence of strong galaxy-galaxy systems in current and future space-based wide-field imaging surveys. We expect that such surveys should uncover a large number of strong lensing systems (more than 10 systems per square degree), which will allow for a detailed statistical analysis of galaxy properties and will likely lead to constraints on models of gravitational structure formation and cosmology. The sample of strong lenses is available here: http://cosmosstronglensing.uni-hd.de/