• Two main models have been developed to explain the mechanisms of release, heating and acceleration of the nascent solar wind, the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) models and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, in which the plasma release processes are fundamentally different. Given that the statistical observational properties of helium ions produced in magnetically diverse solar regions could provide valuable information for the solar wind modelling, we examine the statistical properties of the helium abundance (A_He) and the speed difference between helium ions and protons (v_alpha,p) for coronal holes (CHs), active regions (ARs) and the quiet Sun (QS). We find bimodal distributions in the space of A_He and v_alpha,p/v_A (where v_A is the local Alfven speed)for the solar wind as a whole. The CH wind measurements are concentrated at higher A_He and v_alpha,p/v_A values with a smaller A_He distribution range, while the AR and QS wind is associated with lower A_He and v_alpha,p/v_A, and a larger A_He distribution range. The magnetic diversity of the source regions and the physical processes related to it are possibly responsible for the different properties of A_He and v_alpha,p/v_A. The statistical results suggest that the two solar wind generation mechanisms, WTD and RLO, work in parallel in all solar wind source regions. In CH regions WTD plays a major role, whereas the RLO mechanism is more important in AR and QS.
  • The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveals numerous small-scale (sub-arcsecond) brightenings that appear as bright dots sparkling the solar transition region in active regions. Here, we report a statistical study on these transition region bright dots. We use an automatic approach to identify 2742 dots in a Si IV raster image. We find that the average spatial size of the dots is 0.8 arcsec$^2$ and most of them are located in the faculae area. Their Doppler velocities obtained from the Si IV 1394 {\AA} line range from -20 to 20 km/s. Among these 2742 dots, 1224 are predominantly blue-shifted and 1518 are red-shifted. Their nonthermal velocities range from 4 to 50 km/s with an average of 24 km/s. We speculate that the bright dots studied here are small-scale impulsive energetic events that can heat the active region corona.
  • We present observations of persistent oscillations of some bright features in the upper-chromosphere/transition-region above sunspots taken by IRIS SJ 1400 {\AA} and upward propagating quasi-periodic disturbances along coronal loops rooted in the same region taken by AIA 171 {\AA} passband. The oscillations of the features are cyclic oscillatory motions without any obvious damping. The amplitudes of the spatial displacements of the oscillations are about 1 $^{"}$. The apparent velocities of the oscillations are comparable to the sound speed in the chromosphere, but the upward motions are slightly larger than that of the downward. The intensity variations can take 24-53% of the background, suggesting nonlinearity of the oscillations. The FFT power spectra of the oscillations show dominant peak at a period of about 3 minutes, in consistent with the omnipresent 3 minute oscillations in sunspots. The amplitudes of the intensity variations of the upward propagating coronal disturbances are 10-15% of the background. The coronal disturbances have a period of about 3 minutes, and propagate upward along the coronal loops with apparent velocities in a range of 30-80 km/s. We propose a scenario that the observed transition region oscillations are powered continuously by upward propagating shocks, and the upward propagating coronal disturbances can be the recurrent plasma flows driven by shocks or responses of degenerated shocks that become slow magnetic-acoustic waves after heating the plasma in the coronal loops at their transition-region bases.
  • We report on high-resolution imaging and spectral observations of eruptions of a spiral structure in the transition region, which were taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS), the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The eruption coincided with the appearance of two series of jets, with velocities comparable to the Alfv\'en speeds in their footpoints. Several pieces of evidence of magnetic braiding in the eruption are revealed, including localized bright knots, multiple well-separated jet threads, transition region explosive events and the fact that all these three are falling into the same locations within the eruptive structures. Through analysis of the extrapolated three-dimensional magnetic field in the region, we found that the eruptive spiral structure corresponded well to locations of twisted magnetic flux tubes with varying curl values along their lengths. The eruption occurred where strong parallel currents, high squashing factors, and large twist numbers were obtained. The electron number density of the eruptive structure is found to be $\sim3\times10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$, indicating that significant amount of mass could be pumped into the corona by the jets. Following the eruption, the extrapolations revealed a set of seemingly relaxed loops, which were visible in the AIA 94 \AA\ channel indicating temperatures of around 6.3 MK. With these observations, we suggest that magnetic braiding could be part of the mechanisms explaining the formation of solar eruption and the mass and energy supplement to the corona.
  • We present high-resolution observations of a magnetic reconnection event in the solar atmosphere taken with the New Vacuum Solar Telescope, AIA and HMI. The reconnection event occurred between the threads of a twisted arch filament system (AFS) and coronal loops. Our observations reveal that the relaxation of the twisted AFS drives some of its threads to encounter the coronal loops, providing inflows of the reconnection. The reconnection is evidenced by flared X-shape features in the AIA images, a current-sheet-like feature apparently connecting post-reconnection loops in the \halpha$+$1 \AA\ images, small-scale magnetic cancellation in the HMI magnetograms and flows with speeds of 40--80 km/s along the coronal loops. The post-reconnection coronal loops seen in AIA 94 \AA\ passband appear to remain bright for a relatively long time, suggesting that they have been heated and/or filled up by dense plasmas previously stored in the AFS threads. Our observations suggest that the twisted magnetic system could release its free magnetic energy into the upper solar atmosphere through reconnection processes. While the plasma pressure in the reconnecting flux tubes are significantly different, the reconfiguration of field lines could result in transferring of mass among them and induce heating therein.
  • How the solar corona is heated to high temperatures remains an unsolved mystery in solar physics. In the present study we analyse observations of 50 whole active-region loops taken with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode satellite. Eleven loops were classified as cool (<1 MK) and 39 as warm (1-2 MK) loops. We study their plasma parameters such as densities, temperatures, filling factors, non-thermal velocities and Doppler velocities. We combine spectroscopic analysis with linear force-free magnetic-field extrapolation to derive the three-dimensional structure and positioning of the loops, their lengths and heights as well as the magnetic field strength along the loops. We use density-sensitive line pairs from Fe XII, Fe XIII, Si X and Mg VII ions to obtain electron densities by taking special care of intensity background-subtraction. The emission-measure loci method is used to obtain the loop temperatures. We find that the loops are nearly isothermal along the line-of-sight. Their filling factors are between 8% and 89%. We also compare the observed parameters with the theoretical RTV scaling law. We find that most of the loops are in an overpressure state relative to the RTV predictions. In a followup study, we will report a heating model of a parallel-cascade-based mechanism and will compare the model parameters with the loop plasma and structural parameters derived here.
  • Connecting in-situ measured solar-wind plasma properties with typical regions on the Sun can provide an effective constraint and test to various solar wind models. We examine the statistical characteristics of the solar wind with an origin in different types of source regions. We find that the speed distribution of coronal hole (CH) wind is bimodal with the slow wind peaking at ~400 km/s and a fast at ~600 km/s. An anti-correlation between the solar wind speeds and the O7+/O6+ ion ratio remains valid in all three types of solar wind as well during the three studied solar cycle activity phases, i.e. solar maximum, decline and minimum. The N_Fe/N_O range and its average values all decrease with the increasing solar wind speed in different types of solar wind. The N_Fe/N_O range (0.06-0.40, FIP bias range 1-7) for AR wind is wider than for CH wind (0.06-0.20, FIP bias range 1-3) while the minimum value of N_Fe/N_O (0.06) does not change with the variation of speed, and it is similar for all sourceregions. The two-peak distribution of CH wind and the anti-correlation between the speed and O7+/O6+ in all three types of solar wind can be explained qualitatively by both the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, whereas the distribution features of N_Fe/N_O in different source regions of solar wind can be explained more reasonably by the RLO models.
  • Various small-scale structures abound in the solar atmosphere above active regions, playing an important role in the dynamics and evolution therein. We report on a new class of small-scale transition region structures in active regions, characterized by strong emissions but extremely narrow Si IV line profiles as found in observations taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Tentatively named as Narrow-line-width UV bursts (NUBs), these structures are located above sunspots and comprise of one or multiple compact bright cores at sub-arcsecond scales. We found six NUBs in two datasets (a raster and a sit-and-stare dataset). Among these, four events are short-living with a duration of $\sim$10 mins while two last for more than 36 mins. All NUBs have Doppler shifts of 15--18 km/s, while the NUB found in sit-and-stare data possesses an additional component at $\sim$50 km/s found only in the C II and Mg II lines. Given that these events are found to play a role in the local dynamics, it is important to further investigate the physical mechanisms that generate these phenomena and their role in the mass transport in sunspots.
  • We study intensity disturbances above a solar polar coronal hole seen in the AIA 171 \AA\ and 193 \AA\ passbands, aiming to provide more insights into their physical nature. The damping and power spectra of the intensity disturbances with frequencies from 0.07 mHz to 10.5 mHz are investigated. The damping of the intensity disturbances tends to be stronger at lower frequencies, and their damping behavior below 980" (for comparison, the limb is at 945") is different from what happens above. No significant difference is found between the damping of the intensity disturbances in the AIA 171 \AA\ and that in the AIA 193 \AA. The indices of the power spectra of the intensity disturbances are found to be slightly smaller in the AIA 171 \AA\ than in the AIA 193 \AA, but the difference is within one sigma deviation. An additional enhanced component is present in the power spectra in a period range of 8--40 minutes at lower heights. While the power spectra of spicule is highly correlated with its associated intensity disturbance, it suggests that the power spectra of the intensity disturbances might be a mixture of spicules and wave activities. We suggest that each intensity disturbance in the polar coronal hole is possibly a series of independent slow magnetoacoustic waves triggered by spicular activities.
  • Coronal bright points (BPs) are associated with magnetic bipolar features (MBFs) and magnetic cancellation. Here, we investigate how BP-associated MBFs form and how the consequent magnetic cancellation occurs. We analyse longitudinal magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to investigate the photospheric magnetic flux evolution of 70 BPs. From images taken in the 193 A passband of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) we dermine that the BPs' lifetimes vary from 2.7 to 58.8 hours. The formation of the BP MBFs is found to involve three processes, namely emergence, convergence and local coalescence of the magnetic fluxes. The formation of a MBF can involve more than one of these processes. Out of the 70 cases, flux emergence is the main process of a MBF buildup of 52 BPs, mainly convergence is seen in 28, and 14 cases are associated with local coalescence. For MBFs formed by bipolar emergence, the time difference between the flux emergence and the BP appearance in the AIA 193 \AA\ passband varies from 0.1 to 3.2 hours with an average of 1.3 hours. While magnetic cancellation is found in all 70 BPs, it can occur in three different ways: (I) between a MBF and small weak magnetic features (in 33 BPs); (II) within a MBF with the two polarities moving towards each other from a large distance (34 BPs); (III) within a MBF whose two main polarities emerge in the same place simultaneously (3 BPs). While a MBF builds up the skeleton of a BP, we find that the magnetic activities responsible for the BP heating may involve small weak fields.
  • Transient brightenings in the transition region of the Sun have been studied for decades and are usually related to magnetic reconnection. Recently, absorption features due to chromospheric lines have been identified in transition region emission lines raising the question of the thermal stratification during such reconnection events. We analyse data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in an emerging active region. Here the spectral profiles show clear self-absorption features in the transition region lines of Si\,{\sc{iv}}. While some indications existed that opacity effects might play some role in strong transition region lines, self-absorption has not been observed before. We show why previous instruments could not observe such self-absorption features, and discuss some implications of this observation for the corresponding structure of reconnection events in the atmosphere. Based on this we speculate that a range of phenomena, such as explosive events, blinkers or Ellerman bombs, are just different aspects of the same reconnection event occurring at different heights in the atmosphere.
  • Quasi-periodic propagating disturbances (PDs) are ubiquitous in polar coronal holes on the Sun. It remains unclear as to what generates PDs. In this work, we investigate how the PDs are generated in the solar atmosphere by analyzing a fourhour dataset taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We find convincing evidence that spicular activities in the solar transition region as seen in the AIA 304 {\AA} passband are responsible for PDs in the corona as revealed in the AIA 171 {\AA} images. We conclude that spicules are an important source that triggers coronal PDs.
  • We report on the first Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) study of cool transition region loops. This class of loops has received little attention in the literature. A cluster of such loops was observed on the solar disk in active region NOAA11934, in the Si IV 1402.8 \AA\ spectral raster and 1400 \AA\ slit-jaw (SJ) images. We divide the loops into three groups and study their dynamics and interaction. The first group comprises relatively stable loops, with 382--626\,km cross-sections. Observed Doppler velocities are suggestive of siphon flows, gradually changing from -10 km/s at one end to 20 km/s at the other end of the loops. Nonthermal velocities from 15 to 25 km/s were determined. These physical properties suggest that these loops are impulsively heated by magnetic reconnection occurring at the blue-shifted footpoints where magnetic cancellation with a rate of $10^{15}$ Mx/s is found. The released magnetic energy is redistributed by the siphon flows. The second group corresponds to two footpoints rooted in mixed-magnetic-polarity regions, where magnetic cancellation occurred at a rate of $10^{15}$ Mx/s and line profiles with enhanced wings of up to 200 km/s were observed. These are suggestive of explosive-like events. The Doppler velocities combined with the SJ images suggest possible anti-parallel flows in finer loop strands. In the third group, interaction between two cool loop systems is observed. Evidence for magnetic reconnection between the two loop systems is reflected in the line profiles of explosive events, and a magnetic cancellation rate of $3\times10^{15}$ Mx/s observed in the corresponding area. The IRIS observations have thus opened a new window of opportunity for in-depth investigations of cool transition region loops. Further numerical experiments are crucial for understanding their physics and their role in the coronal heating processes.
  • We identify the coronal sources of the solar winds sampled by the ACE spacecraft during 1999-2008, and examine the in situ solar wind properties as a function of wind sources. The standard two-step mapping technique is adopted to establish the photospheric footpoints of the magnetic flux tubes along which the ACE winds flow. The footpoints are then placed in the context of EIT 284~\AA\ images and photospheric magnetograms, allowing us to categorize the sources into four groups: coronal holes (CHs), active regions (ARs), the quiet Sun (QS), and "Undefined". This practice also enables us to establish the response to solar activity of the fractions occupied by each kind of solar winds, and of their speeds and O$^{7+}$/O$^{6+}$ ratios measured in situ. We find that during the maximum phase, the majority of ACE winds originate from ARs. During the declining phase, CHs and ARs are equally important contributors to the ACE solar winds. The QS contribution increases with decreasing solar activity, and maximizes in the minimum phase when QS appear to be the primary supplier of the ACE winds. With decreasing activity, the winds from all sources tend to become cooler, as represented by the increasingly low O$^{7+}$/O$^{6+}$ ratios. On the other hand, during each activity phase, the AR winds tend to be the slowest and associated with the highest O$^{7+}$/O$^{6+}$ ratios, and the CH winds correspond to the other extreme, with the QS winds lying in between. Applying the same analysis method to the slow winds only, here defined as the winds with speeds lower than 500 km s$^{-1}$, we find basically the same overall behavior, as far as the contributions of individual groups of sources are concerned. This statistical study indicates that QS regions are an important source of the solar wind during the minimum phase.
  • We present study of a typical explosive event (EE) at sub-arcsecond scale witnessed by strong non-Gaussian profiles with blue- and red-shifted emission of up to 150 km/s seen in the transition-region Si IV 1402.8 \AA, and the chromospheric Mg II k 2796.4 \AA\ and C II 1334.5 \AA\ observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph at unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution. For the first time a EE is found to be associated with very small-scale ($\sim$120 km wide) plasma ejection followed by retraction in the chromosphere. These small-scale jets originate from a compact bright-point-like structure of $\sim$1.5" size as seen in the IRIS 1330 \AA\ images. SDO/AIA and SDO/HMI co-observations show that the EE lies in the footpoint of a complex loop-like brightening system. The EE is detected in the higher temperature channels of AIA 171 \AA, 193 \AA\ and 131 \AA\ suggesting that it reaches a higher temperature of log T$=5.36\pm0.06$ (K). Brightenings observed in the AIA channels with durations 90--120 seconds are probably caused by the plasma ejections seen in the chromosphere. The wings of the C II line behave in a similar manner as the Si IV's indicating close formation temperatures, while the Mg II k wings show additional Doppler-shifted emission. Magnetic convergence or emergence followed by cancellation at a rate of $5\times10^{14}$ Mx s$^{-1}$ is associated with the EE region. The combined changes of the locations and the flux of different magnetic patches suggest that magnetic reconnection must have taken place. Our results challenge several theories put forward in the past to explain non-Gaussian line profiles, i.e. EEs. Our case study on its own, however, cannot reject these theories, thus further in-depth studies on the phenomena producing EEs are required.
  • The contribution of plumes to the solar wind has been subject to hot debate in the past decades. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode provides a unique means to deduce outflow velocities at coronal heights via direct Doppler shift measurements of coronal emission lines. Such direct Doppler shift measurements were not possible with previous spectrometers. We measure the outflow velocity at coronal heights in several on-disk long-duration plumes, which are located in coronal holes and show significant blue shifts throughout the entire observational period. In one case, a plume is measured 4 hours apart. The deduced outflow velocities are consistent, suggesting that the flows are quasi-steady. Furthermore, we provide an outflow velocity profile along the plumes, finding that the velocity corrected for the line-of-sight effect can reach 10 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.02 $R_{\odot}$, 15 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.03 $R_{\odot}$, and 25 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.05 $R_{\odot}$. This clear signature of steady acceleration, combined with the fact that there is no significant blue shift at the base of plumes, provides an important constraint on plume models. At the height of 1.03 $R_{\odot}$, EIS also deduced a density of 1.3$\times10^{8}$ cm$^{-3}$, resulting in a proton flux of about 4.2$\times10^9$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ scaled to 1AU, which is an order of magnitude higher than the proton input to a typical solar wind if a radial expansion is assumed. This suggests that, coronal hole plumes may be an important source of the solar wind.
  • We analyze several data sets obtained by Hinode/EIS and find various types of flows during CMEs and EUV jet eruptions. CME-induced dimming regions are found to be characterized by significant blueshift and enhanced line width by using a single Gaussian fit. While a red-blue (RB) asymmetry analysis and a RB-guided double Gaussian fit of the coronal line profiles indicate that these are likely caused by the superposition of a strong background emission component and a relatively weak (~10%) high-speed (~100 km s-1) upflow component. This finding suggests that the outflow velocity in the dimming region is probably of the order of 100 km s-1, not ~20 km s-1 as reported previously. Density and temperature diagnostics suggest that dimming is primarily an effect of density decrease rather than temperature change. The mass losses in dimming regions as estimated from different methods are roughly consistent with each other and they are 20%-60% of the masses of the associated CMEs. With the guide of RB asymmetry analysis, we also find several temperature-dependent outflows (speed increases with temperature) immediately outside the (deepest) dimming region. In an erupted CME loop and an EUV jet, profiles of emission lines formed at coronal and transition region temperatures are found to exhibit two well-separated components, an almost stationary component accounting for the background emission and a highly blueshifted (~200 km s-1) component representing emission from the erupting material. The two components can easily be decomposed through a double Gaussian fit and we can diagnose the electron density, temperature and mass of the ejecta. Combining the speed of the blueshifted component and the projected speed of the erupting material derived from simultaneous imaging observations, we can calculate the real speed of the ejecta.